NPR

Why 'Why Buddhism Is True' Is True

In his new book, Robert Wright explores Buddhism's take on our suffering, our anxiety and our general dis-ease — where he sees it lining up with scientific fields, says blogger Adam Frank.
Source: Gargolas

Here is one thing author Robert Wright and I agree on when it comes to Buddhist meditation: It's really, really boring.

At least, it's boring in the beginning. But there's another thing we agree on, too. That initial meditative boredom is actually a door. It's an opening that can lead us to something essential, and essentially true, that Buddhism has to teach us about being human.

Wright's insight on this point is just one of the many truths in his delightfully personal, yet broadly important, new book Why Buddhism Is True.

The "true" in Wright's title doesn't refer to the traditional kinds of scriptural truths we think of when we that Wright wants to explore because that's where he sees its perspective lining up with scientific fields like evolutionary psychology and neurobiology.

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