The Atlantic

The 'Underground Railroad' To Save Atheists

A vision to protect those persecuted for non-religion
Source: Henghameh Fahimi / AFP / Getty

Lubna Yaseen was a student in Baghdad when death threats forced her into exile. Her crime was to think the unthinkable and question the unquestionable—to state, openly, that she was an atheist.

Growing up in Hillah, a city in central Iraq, she developed an independent mind at a young age. “My mother is an atheist intellectual person, and she brought up me and my siblings to think for ourselves and to be open to anything,” she told me. Yaseen was particularly concerned about her teachers’ attitudes toward women. “I always asked why girls should wear a hijab and boys are not obligated to do so,” she said. Why would “God” treat the two sexes differently? She quickly learned the dangers of expressing these views: Her teachers often threw her out of their classes, and sometimes beat her.

In 2006, when Yaseen and her mother were driving home one day, al-Qaeda militants pulled them over and threatened to kill them for not wearing the hijab. Still, Yaseen’s desire to explore secular thinking grew at university. “I couldn’t keep my mouth shut. Whenever there was a conversation, I talked.” She started handing out leaflets on

Anda sedang membaca pratinjau, daftarlah untuk membaca selengkapnya.

Lainnya dari The Atlantic

The Atlantic7 mnt membacaTech
It’s a Winner-Take-All World, Whether You Like It or Not
Not long ago, I reached out to a writer I respect, and posed the uncomfortable question authors find themselves forced to ask: Would she write a blurb—the endorsement you see on the back cover—for my new book about how a person can navigate a career
The Atlantic4 mnt membacaPsychology
Dear Therapist: The Child My Daughter Put Up for Adoption Is Now Rejecting Her
She thought that her daughter would want to meet her one day. Twenty-five years later, that’s not true.
The Atlantic7 mnt membaca
The Man With 17 Kids (And Counting)
After becoming a sperm donor, Tim Gullicksen wanted to get to know his donor kids. Now he invites them all out to a lake in California every summer.