The Millions

Kazuo Ishiguro and the Inescapable Perils of the Internet

“I have this feeling, that all it will take will be one moment, even a tiny moment.”

When Kazuo Ishiguro won the Nobel Prize in Literature I was slightly disappointed. I was a “Harukist”—over the preceding eight months, I had been religiously reading the novels and short stories of Haruki Murakami. As a series they are recognizable as a related body of work with the same ideas, motifs, often a central piece of music and a certain brand of whiskey appearing with regularity. But with each new book, Murakami follows the growing roots of his literary tree to a new colony. To me, he seemed to have done just as much, if not more than Ishiguro and in a similar vein.

As with a lot of things in life though, I was uninformed. A conversation with a friend led us both to the conclusion that, despite our surprise, neither of us had read one of Ishiguro’s novels, nor did we know a lot about him. A quick Google search led me past The Booker Prize winning , after reading a quote in which Ishiguro almost admitted he was bored writing it. In an interview with , he stated that writing was almost too easy—“a bit like pushing a button

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