The Atlantic

Sharon Van Etten’s Synth-Pop Celebration of Vulnerability

Remind Me Tomorrow, the Brooklyn singer’s fifth album, bustles with the feeling of disconnection conquered.
Source: Ryan Pfluger

Piano chords descend at ritual pace, reverberating as if in a cathedral. A woman sings, her each word a weary quaver. “Sitting at the bar, I told you everything,” she begins.

Then: “You said, ‘Holy shit.’”

This is how Sharon Van Etten kicks off her fifth album, with a moment that marks the sole time I’ve LOLed—so much so that it required hitting pause—while listening to her. The Brooklyn songwriter,

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