The Atlantic

FaceApp Makes Today’s Privacy Laws Look Antiquated

Cameras are everywhere, and data brokers are vacuuming up information on individuals. But regulations have not kept pace.
Source: Mike Segar / Reuters

Americans give billions of dollars a year to industries that promise to make them look younger. FaceApp became wildly popular, seemingly overnight, for doing the exact opposite. Applying a filter powered by artificial intelligence, the photo-editing app modifies photos of its users’ faces to show them what they might look like when they’re much older. The resulting images aren’t the only thing about FaceApp that strikes some people as creepy. FaceApp is the handiwork of a relatively unknown company in Russia—a provenance that, amid evidence of election interference and other misdeeds by Russian hackers, has raised widespread concerns in Washington. The Democratic National Committee and Senate Minority Leader Chuck are now calling out the app as a privacy threat.

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