The Guardian

Economists calculate monetary value of 'thoughts and prayers'

US study finds Christians are willing to pay for prayers – but atheists will pay to avoid them
The study attempts to understand the backlash when ‘thoughts and prayers’ are offered after disasters or mass shootings. Photograph: Alamy

All things have a price – and if not, economists will find one. Researchers have calculated the going rate for thoughts and prayers offered in hard times.

Rather than settling on one price for all, the study found the value of a compassionate gesture depended overwhelmingly on a person’s beliefs. While Christian participants were willing to part with money

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