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Ender in Exile

Ender in Exile


Ender in Exile

peringkat:
4/5 (52 peringkat)
Panjangnya:
13 jam
Dirilis:
Nov 11, 2008
ISBN:
9781427205131
Format:
Buku Audio

Deskripsi

Orson Scott Card returns to his best-selling series with a new Ender novel, Ender in Exile.

At the close of Ender's Game, Andrew Wiggin — called Ender by everyone — is told that he can no longer live on Earth, and he realizes that this is the truth. He has become far more than just a boy who won a game: he is the Savior of Earth, a hero, a military genius whose allegiance is sought by every nation of the newly shattered Earth Hegemony.

He is offered the choice of living in isolation on Eros, at one of the Hegemony's training facilities, but instead the twelve-year-old chooses to leave his home world and begin the long relativistic journey out to the colonies. With him went his sister Valentine, and the core of the artificial intelligence that would become Jane.

The story of those years has never been told... until now.

Dirilis:
Nov 11, 2008
ISBN:
9781427205131
Format:
Buku Audio

Tentang penulis

Orson Scott Card is best known for his science fiction novel Ender's Game and its many sequels that expand the Ender Universe into the far future and the near past. Those books are organized into the Ender Saga, which chronicles the life of Ender Wiggin; the Shadow Series, which follows on the novel Ender's Shadow and is set on Earth; and the Formic Wars series, written with co-author Aaron Johnston, which tells of the terrible first contact between humans and the alien "Buggers." Card has been a working writer since the 1970s. Beginning with dozens of plays and musical comedies produced in the 1960s and 70s, Card's first published fiction appeared in 1977--the short story "Gert Fram" in the July issue of The Ensign, and the novelette version of "Ender's Game" in the August issue of Analog. The novel-length version of Ender's Game, published in 1984 and continuously in print since then, became the basis of the 2013 film, starring Asa Butterfield, Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley, Hailee Steinfeld, Viola Davis, and Abigail Breslin. Card was born in Washington state, and grew up in California, Arizona, and Utah. He served a mission for the LDS Church in Brazil in the early 1970s. Besides his writing, he runs occasional writers' workshops and directs plays. He frequently teaches writing and literature courses at Southern Virginia University. He is the author many science fiction and fantasy novels, including the American frontier fantasy series "The Tales of Alvin Maker" (beginning with Seventh Son), and stand-alone novels like Pastwatch and Hart's Hope. He has collaborated with his daughter Emily Card on a manga series, Laddertop. He has also written contemporary thrillers like Empire and historical novels like the monumental Saints and the religious novels Sarah and Rachel and Leah. Card's work also includes the Mithermages books (Lost Gate, Gate Thief), contemporary magical fantasy for readers both young and old. Card lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Kristine Allen Card. He and Kristine are the parents of five children and several grandchildren.


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4.1
52 peringkat / 33 Ulasan
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  • (5/5)
    This is the spawn of Orson's book Ender's Game and like it is psychological and tries to examine why people treat each other the way that we do, starting from a child's point of view. It is an extension of that book, continuing to demonstrate the strengths of Sci Fi: examining particular aspects of psychology and pondering what is possible for the human future. Its for day dreaming and to encourage introspection. One weakness it has: not everyone will find it easy to identify with Ender, but most people will. He is a cross between Sherlock Holmes and Dudley Do Right. All good characters love him, and all bad characters hate him. Our grey real world becomes one of good versus evil, and there can only be one victor between the two.
  • (5/5)
    I live all of the Enders game books ..They keep my attention and that's not easy to do.
  • (2/5)
    Ender Wiggin’s eradication of the Buggers at the end of Ender’s Game cemented his reputation as the greatest military hero the world has ever seen. To avoid jeopardizing the peace agreement between all nations, the great hero has to leave Earth and become governor of a new colony on a now-vacant Formic planet. But why does Ender agree to leave? What convinces his sister Valentine to go with him? What happens on the colony ship, and how does Ender cope with the knowledge of all that he’s done and all he still needs to do? This is the story of Ender’s days between the end of the Formic Wars and the events of Speaker for the Dead.

    Ender in Exile is hailed as a direct sequel to Ender’s Game, but there are many references to events detailed in the companion Shadow series. By necessity, this book has to achieve a very specific narrative arc to bridge the gap from the end of the first book to the beginning of the second, and as a result the plot is stiff and forced. Pacing bumps along over irrelevant characters and plot points; stronger editing would help this over-long novel. The writing is pedantic, laced with political and biological jargon, and pushes some of Card’s own socially-conservative agenda. This is an optional read at best.
  • (5/5)
    Since it was written after all of the other books, it's not quite right to say it's book 1.5, even though chronologically (except for the many varied complications of space travel and time dilation) it does fall that way. However, some events are revealed that transpired in the Shadow books, so you will probably want to read those first unless you're a big fan of being spoiled. Those who love Ender and yearn for more about him will love this additional insight into his character and the revelation of the intervening years between Ender's Game and Speaker for the Dead.
  • (4/5)
    Not as fresh as Ender's Game or even Ender's Shadow but it certainly was a worthy read. Given that I have not read any of the follow up books to Ender's Shadow (yet) I was not familiar with all the tie-ins.[return]Reading this book has got me reading some ender stuff again.
  • (1/5)
    Twelve discs of meandering, bloated melodrama. I loved the original four Ender books. Card made Ender and Val too clever for their own good. Val especially came off as a manipulative, condescending snatch. i partially blame the actress reading her though. Mysogeny ahoy as well. This was probably one of the most unnecessary things I have ever read, and like the Bean books, cheapens the original story. For the love of god, OSC, please leave the Ender-verse alone.
  • (5/5)
    This is the direct sequel (sequentially) to Ender's Game, which was published in 1984 and is still my all-time favorite sci-fi book. Card has written a number of books in the Ender series, but he's always skipped the time period directly after the first book. This one is worth the wait. The story opens in the weeks after the war has ended, and the Battle School space station is being emptied as the child soldiers go home to Earth. Ender is sadly not going home, though, as none of the nations of the world can agree to where he should live -- everyone wants control of the world's most important young hero. The compromise is that he will be appointed governor of the first colony of humans on one of the conquered alien planets where life is sustainable. His sister Valentine decides to accompany him, and their brother Peter stays on Earth to fulfill his dream of becoming the leader of the world. Ender just want to live quietly and search for the answers to his questions about the alien race he destroyed. But everyone wants something from him -- will he ever get what he wants? The reading level is more difficult than some of the other Ender books, and Exile addresses many post-war and reconstruction themes that are important today: how do we rebuild society and create new governments in peace, and how do we help soldiers deal with the horrors they have seen and the actions they had to take to win the war? Ender fans will delve right into this one! 8th grade and up.
  • (2/5)
    With the exception of the Bean's missing child, there was nothing, having read the rest of the Ender and Shadow series, that I didn't already know the conclusion to. The book bridges the gap between Ender and Speaker, simply giving more insight into the events already talked about in Ender's Game, and it reads like a series of novella's, each story having nothing to do with the last, and there is no character continuity between one story and the next. I don't think it should have been written as a novel, but instead written as short stories, because that's how it felt. Nothing significant happens, but it is mildly interesting to read about. A bit of a dissappointment considering the main characters in Xenocide are an ant, a tree, a pig, and a Chinese girl with OCD and I loved it. Here we have actual people, including Ender and Val, and there was just nothing exciting about it, no major conflict, no developments, just filler that OSC felt he needed to publish to complete a story that was good enough without it. Definitely do no read unless you have read the other books first and simply want to learn more about the Enderverse.
  • (4/5)
    While not as strong as the earliest books in this series (by date written, not chronology), I can nevertheless recommend Ender in Exile to fans of the series. It fills in a gap in Ender's (and Valentine's) story, and introduces a few interesting minor characters. All the story lines involve the relationship between parents and children in some way, so someone with kids might relate to the book more closely than I did. Still, the story was interesting enough that I read it in a single day.
  • (3/5)
    Under normal circumstances, I probably would have only rated this book a three, as plot-wise, it is hardly riveting, though enjoyable enough. Though the Enderverse books are never solely about the action, the focus is usually less trained on the characters themselves and their growth than some overarching plotline, which I felt was reversed here. There is still the usual intrigue, but the real reason I had to rate this book with four stars is simply because the book is about Ender and how he thinks and feels in the aftermath of winning the war and he is apparently a horrible Achilles' heel of mine.Essentially, I'd mainly recommend this book to diehard Ender fans. If you like the Enderverse in general, you'll probably enjoy it, and if you love Ender himself, I'd wager you'll really enjoy it, but otherwise, it's not a brilliant sci-fi novel or even particularly well-written.
  • (3/5)
    This is not the best in the Ender saga. Pretty minor compared to some of the others, but it does fill in a gap.
  • (3/5)
    This is not the best in the Ender saga. Pretty minor compared to some of the others, but it does fill in a gap.
  • (4/5)
    Picking up just where Ender's Game leaves off, this new book in the series fills in the gap between Game and Speaker for the Dead. The book deals a lot with Ender's struggle to come to terms his guilt from unknowingly killing the buggers. It also introduces some new interesting characters and provides additional info about Ender's fellow battle school mates. I loved the parts that gave us Ender's parents' point-of-view. Their three children underestimate their intelligence and I enjoy hearing their perspective. All of the Wiggins have a tendency to spend every waking moment strategizing and planning their next move. Even when they are well-intentioned, the Wiggins are master manipulators, which is half the fun of their characters. I've loved these characters for years and have gotten to know them in eight other books in the series, so it was wonderful to return to that world. I would recommend this for those who have loved the Wiggins, but not to anyone new to the books. You should definitely start with Ender's Game.
  • (5/5)
    LT's "Will you like it" predicted I would love this book (with high confidence.) Yay Tim and your awesome math. I quite enjoyed this one, to the point of staying up far too late to read it in just two sessions on work nights after going to the gym. I was 35 seconds shy of being late to work, it was so good.Which isn't to say it was perfect, just darned satisfying; I can't imagine what all the fans of the Ender series who actually read them when they first were published felt, but when I knew this book existed, I bought it within seconds. Bearing in mind, I did the same thing with the 5th, 6th, and (yes, third time, shame on me squared, etc.) 7th Harry Potter books, and I threw one of them across the room, I was so annoyed with it. This book was the opposite of that. Yes I can think of ten ways to improve it without blinking, but they're not eye-twitch-inducing problems for me; with everything that's followed Ender's Game we're about 1% of the way to the wackiness that JRR Tolkien thrust upon his fanboys, and I'm OK with that.The plot is what it is; if you've read everything (especially First Meetings) recently enough more than a few pages are completely skipable; if you don't like a bit of high-handed Christian content what on earth are you doing reading Orson Scott Card books? I probably bumped the book by a full star just because it was a satisfying new bit of Enderness.Oh, and that prediction? I, uh, own all the rest of the Ender books. It was a little like shooting a fish that's actually affixed directly in front of your muzzle, really.
  • (5/5)
    When I first read the solicits for this book when it was announced forever ago, I was promised Ender meeting Achilles as the main plot of the novel, which, frankly, isn't what happens. However, this is not a bad thing, nor does it ruin the novel; rather, the introduction of Achilles near the very end is exactly where it should be. This novel focuses on Ender as he deals with his issues of killing the formics and his inability to deal with the fact that he's killed people who have attacked him in self-defense, one of the major driving forces of the novel. Some of the scenes that didn't involve Ender, Achilles, or Valentine sometimes seem like needless filler, but in the end they more than make up for it. Definitely something that Ender fans should look forward to reading, but I would recommend getting the series that focuses on Bean first in order to understand everything from this novel. A great book and a wonderful addition to the Ender mythos.
  • (4/5)
    Good story. Ender's character is developed well. A bit too much "Christian" preaching.
  • (2/5)
    I liked this book a fair amount.The beginning wasn't my favorite part as you have all the drama with Peter and his family all over again (provided you read the Ender's Shadow books). It gets more interesting later, I think.I suppose the ending was pretty satisfying. I like how the author talks about his writing afterward.
  • (4/5)
    While I have to disapprove a bit of Card's obvious milking of the Ender series for all that it's worth, I'll admit that I've been eagerly awaiting this novel for some time. I can't say I was disappointed--the book demonstrates Ender's maturing from the young, reluctant soldier of Ender's Game to the man he is in Speaker for the Dead quite seamlessly, as far as I could tell, and I enjoyed the new characters the author introduced as well as the old ones he expanded on. Is this book necessary to tell the entire Ender story? Probably not, but it's a nice treat for Ender fans eager for more canon material. Overall, I'm satisfied.
  • (2/5)
    It was only reluctantly that I picked up this book at all. Ever since I learned that Orson Scott Card is such a giant Mormon douchebag, my opinion of him has taken a tumble. But, as I'm normally able to separate the art from the politics of the artist, I gave it a chance. Sure, he's milking the Ender series (this is what, the eighth book set this universe? ), but I believed that I could still enjoy revisiting one of my favorite characters. I was wrong.First, Card's Mormonism and the profoundly weird worldview he subscribes to was readily apparent in the novel - at several points I had to roll my eyes at "heterosexual monogamy is the bestest greatest thing evar and the only thing that has ever worked". It was also implied that the whole point to the human experience is to make as many children as possible. And there were also some frankly troubling undertones about the appropriate role of women and what they should aspire to. One character even openly wonders "Is there something in women that makes us long to be humbled?". Disgusting.Religious themes and overtones don't normally bother me, but it felt like he was preaching these ideas to the reader. In the context of the world he had built, these views made little sense, and there was a notable absence of any competing ideas among the characters - it was as if they were all Mormon.Second, this is a novel that filled a gap that just didn't need to be filled. It basically takes place at the end of Ender's Game - not after the end of Ender's Game, but during it. Never did I feel that there was a missing story there. And frankly, there wasn't much of a story to be told. The plot was mostly dull, and the conflicts all felt contrived. He spent most of the book building up a conflict between Ender and the Captain of the ship he was traveling on, only to diffuse it anticlimactically when they arrived at the planet. After recapping the events at the end of Ender's Game, he spent rest of the novel was spent tying up loose ends from his Bean novels. The novel was simply disjointed and lacked any compelling raison d'être.Overall, disappointing.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book simply because I missed Ender. A character that has been missing since Ender’s Game. The rest of the original series followed Andrew, same man but not quite the same person. He had grown up and changed in that time. The shadow books followed Bean and other characters that were considered minor in Ender’s Game. This book brings Ender back as he was just after the war. He was a smart and natural leader who had the flaws of someone who was still a child in so many ways. Just to see that Ender again made this book well worth it. Card also brings back the moral issues of the first book and forces Ender to come to grips with his actions during the war, something that seemed to have been brushed over in the other novels.
  • (3/5)
    This is a book with no real reason to be. It fills a gap that didn't need to be filled, explains things that didn't need further explanation. It's a pleasant enough read, but it has no point, either narratively or thematically.
  • (3/5)
    I adore Ender's Game. Have every since I spent the busride home in 7th grade crying over the last two chapters. It holds a very special place in my heart. I was delighted to go back there with the various Shadow books - I found Bean's story, and the story of Peter's Hegemonic rise on earth, to be compelling and interesting. But this book should not have been written. It's difficult to describe, save to say that there is nothing in this book that was not better served by the gap between the final chapters in Ender's Game which it fills. The entire thing feels like some lesser writer's attempt to wrap up loose ends he can't bear to leave dangling, and he does a hack job of it. Some of the characters in this book are entirely unrecognizeable. Those who remain themselves lose all their subtlety, all the glory that makes them so heart-breakingly human in other books. Here, nothing is left unsaid - it is all laid out in bizarre confrontations, in long, soul-searching letters, in interior monologues that read clunky and ungainly. There is no /grace/ to Ender in Exile. Everything about it feels contrived and obvious - and that's when it /doesn't/ feel out of character. This is a story that should have stayed in the hearts and minds of the readers - it would have been better served there, in our various imaginations, as our hearts broke for Ender the Savior, the Xenocide, the Speaker for the Dead. A few more nitpicky details: - I refuse, now and forever, to call them 'formics'. They're buggers. Anyone with two cents worth of sense can see the difference in the /feel/ of the words and their impact on the reader.- The heavy-handed Mormonism is getting worse. The number of times I had to roll my eyes at the emphasis that children are /everything/ and that, by the way, monogamy is the only cultural style that has ever resulted in anything other than horror was /far/ too high. And by the time a certain character wondered whether women want to be humbled, I nearly chucked the book across the room.- Speaking of women, the new ones in this book are /ridiculous/. They don't look human. If there's one thing Card's always been great at, it's human. What happened?- I absolutely intend to ignore the fact that Card feels the need to rewrite the lovely ending to his original novel to account for the ridiculous mess of this one. I will now proceed to forget that I read this novel, and will instead reread the ending chapters of Ender's Game and let it replace this in my head.
  • (2/5)
    A little ho-hum. Not great like some of his other books are. It felt a bit like a bunch of epilogues to his other books tacked together. He answered some of the questions you might still be wondering about, but did he really need so many pages to do it?
  • (4/5)
    I will start this post by thanking Julie at FSB Associates for sending me this book. I have been a fan of Orson Scott Card's for a long time, so when I read about the give away for Ender in Exile I was very excited.If you've read my post about re-reading Ender's Game, then you'll know that I recently met Orson Scott Card at a book signing here in my own town of Denton, TX. It made me realize that a person should never meet their idols! Not so much for myself but for my mother. She's the one that started my love of Ender and all the other stories in his world, so I was very sad that she had such a bad experience at the signing that she refuses to buy anymore of his books. For me, the wait in the line (more than 2 hours and I was close to the front!) was not so bad since I met another fan of Ender and Buffy. We got to talk for the entire two hours about the fantasy worlds we love. Meeting Card afterward, and talking to him about Speaker for the Dead (my favorite in the series) was a great experience for me after that. As for my mother, I hope this book will change her mind. She did say she would read it (simply because she doesn't have to buy it!).On to the book. Again I impressed with Card's storytelling ability. When I heard the premise of the book, I just couldn't imagine that he could find enough for a full novel. The book takes place in between Ender's Game and the second book Speaker for the Dead, specifically between chapters 14 and 15, which he wrote to bridge the novelette of Ender's Game to the novel and the sequel. I just wasn't sure what he could say that would be different than what was ALREADY said. Of course, that's why he's the writer and I'm not. The book opens with a very touching scene between the Wiggin parents that made me see them in an entirely different light. They are finally given dimension, whereas before they seemed more like caricatures of parents.A good portion of the book takes place on the ship between the base he is at in the end of Ender's Game and colony he becomes governor over afterward. It's mainly about the relationships that are formed and broken on the ship not only with Ender but with characters we've maybe never met before (at least I don't remember some of them). I truly enjoyed this part of the book and felt that when he actually arrived at the colony and settled an important conflict, the best part of the book was over. The rest was the icing on the cake.One of the themes throughout the series, whether intentional or not, has been Ender's constant soul searching. "Am I a good person? Can I do what's expected of me? Should I bother?" Even though Ender's age in Earth years is well beyond his physical age of 17, in some ways he continues to think as a teenager. Card constantly tries to make the point that Ender is not like other children, through the first book, Ender's Shadow, and this new one, but I believe that his soul searching questions are more typical of teenagers than most people believe. For all his intelligence and training and separateness, Ender is still a teenager in need of reassurance and love. He eventually writes a very moving letter to his parents that hit a chord with me, as it could have been written from me to my grandparents. Parts of that letter were exactly things I have said and things I wish I could have said.As good as this book was, I do not believe it could stand on it's own or even be considered the second book in the series. Now that I've read it I feel that, of course, this should have been written and completes the series like nothing else can. However, if I read this directly after reading Ender's Game for the first time, I think I would have been very disappointed and I can't even explain why. It simply doesn't work as a second book in the series even though, chronologically, that's where it fits. Maybe it's because there is too much recap and expanding on previous themes. Maybe it's because Ender is never really in danger of any kind because we know what happens later. Or maybe it's because I just love Speaker for the Dead so much that it will always be the perfect sequel to Ender's Game. Either way, this book is very well written and the story is captivating, but it could never be anything other than a stand alone novel about characters we already love.
  • (4/5)
    An amazing read. I'm still torn on whether Ender's Game or Ender in Exile is the best. I think they are equally good, just on different merits. While Ender's Game dealt with Ender dealing with being used as a weapon, Ender in Exile deals with him coming to grips with what he has done, and what life he wishes to lead.Psychologically, it gives an amazing look into the mind of a man (technically a boy, but with his experiences, definitely a man) that has annihilated an entire race of intelligent beings, and while he accepts this was necessary, he can't come to grips with why they let him.Highly recommended. A novel that everyone should read and think about.
  • (3/5)
    just not the same as Ender's Game, but I like the characters so I'll read some more...the dialogues consisted of sarcastic witty comebacks and it got tedious after a while
  • (4/5)
    I was pleasantly surprised to find this on the bookshelf, and I am continually surprised by Orson Scott Card. He seems to have a solid grasp on human nature and bends it to his will in all his characters. I am glad that Card decided to go back and write about the teenaged Ender. I am also pleased that he tied this to his parallax Shadow series. While this is not as thought-heavy as the other novels, revisiting Ender's world is always a treat.
  • (4/5)
    Ender has just won the war versus the formics and is waiting in vain to be returned to Earth. He finds himself on a voyage to Colony 1 and appointed it's governor and that is just the beginning. A power struggle on route, a romance to be avoided, and finding the answers to Ender's darkest questions are just a few of the story lines. I found myself on a journey in a universe of fond memories while reading. I cant wait to go back and re-read all the Ender books.
  • (5/5)
    For anyone who just can't get enough of Ender, this book delivers in a way that the later books in the original saga and the shadow series did not. With a few unexpected subplots and an ending that leaves yet another opening for future parallel novels, Card scores another win for this Ender addict.
  • (4/5)
    The title says it all. After Ender Wiggin saves the world from alien invasion the rulers of Earth don’t know what to do with him. Ender is a hero and since he is so young, they fear he could be used by adults to take over the world. It is decided by the people who love him that he should be kept away from home. He is sent to Shakespeare Colony to become its governor. His sister Valentine leaves Earth to be with him. The rest of the story is about his voyage, his discoveries on the world that was first colonized be the formics, and how he reconnects an old friend with her lost son.This book fills in the gap of what happened between chapters 14 and 15 of “Ender’s Game.” Some people may feel this book didn’t need to be written. I haven’t read the Shadow series or the last two books in the Ender series so the revelations about Bean were new to me. This may have made this book more enjoyable because not everything was a rehash of previous plot devices. I wanted to know about what happened to Ender and his friends from battle school. This book explains how he wrote “The Hive Queen” and why he becomes reviled as the Xenocide. I also enjoyed what makes Ender such a great character; the way he outwits everyone and makes them see his way of doing things, how his enemies fall in love with him, and how he always wins.