From the Publisher

The outcome of most persuasive events is determined before you ever say a word. People may know how to sell, but most were never taught how to persuade. Persuasion expert Dave Lakhani breaks down the process into easy-to-use steps, teaching the listener not only how to persuade, but the biology and psychology behind it as well.

Persuasion is key to every aspect of sales, marketing, and negotiations. This audiobook reveals today's most effective persuasion techniques for business professionals, which can easily be applied to their personal lives as well.

Though the techniques are similar, Lakhani draws a hard line between persuasion and manipulation, with the primary distinction being intent. True persuasion is based in truth, honesty and inquisitiveness, and the ability to tell a powerful story and to meet the expectations of those one is trying to persuade. Good persuasion is a practiced art - so Lakhani gives the listener:
A map for the persuasive process Persuasion tools and instructions for use 17 persuasion tactics to instantly persuade The Persuasion Equation The Six Tenets of Persuasion Steps to becoming an expert in just 30 days Quick Persuaders: tools to use every day
Citing the opinions of noted neuroscientists, psychologists, and influence professionals, and featuring examples of persuasion at work in sales, copywriting, advertising, negotiations, and personal interactions, this audiobook supports its theories and shows how to get a message through the electronic clutter facing decision-makers today.
The listener will learn to layer on tactic after tactic to methodically and effectively break down natural resistance, increase the emotions of acceptance and desire, and move the prospect to the right outcome: the outcome the listener desires.
Published: Gildan Audio on
ISBN: 9781469089607
Unabridged
Listen on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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