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From the Publisher

The meditations on this one-hour program detail the practical techniques of using mental imagery and affirmation to produce positive change in one's life. In each meditation, Shakti Gawain describes specific images and directs listeners as they go through the meditation process. Meditations include Meditation Journey; Deep Relaxation; Visualizing a Goal; Running Energy; and much more.
Published: New World Library Audio on
ISBN: 9781577313632
Unabridged
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