Temukan buku audio favorit Anda berikutnya

Jadilah anggota hari ini dan dengarkan secara gratis selama 30 hari
Ironhand

Ironhand

Ditulis oleh Charlie Fletcher

Diceritakan oleh Jim Dale


Ironhand

Ditulis oleh Charlie Fletcher

Diceritakan oleh Jim Dale

peringkat:
4.5/5 (52 peringkat)
Panjangnya:
9 hours
Dirilis:
May 1, 2008
ISBN:
9780545122337
Format:
Buku Audio

Deskripsi

The war between the statues of London rages on as George Chapman must complete three challenges to save his own life.
Dirilis:
May 1, 2008
ISBN:
9780545122337
Format:
Buku Audio

Tentang penulis


Terkait dengan Ironhand


Ulasan

Pendapat orang tentang Ironhand

4.3
52 peringkat / 14 Ulasan
Apa pendapat Anda?
Penilaian: 0 dari 5 bintang

Ulasan pembaca

  • (4/5)
    I bought this second hand so I was prepared not to be all that enthralled by this book, but, while I can't say that I was fully enthralled, it was engaging and I enjoyed the premise along with an engaging storyline. George, our young protagonist, finds himself in a London barely familiar to him after a trip to London's Natural History Museum finds him damaging a carving of a dragon. Soon after, he finds himself being hunted by gargoyles and all sorts of other horrifyingly statuary, and in danger of re-igniting a war between the fantasy sculptures and the commemoratory sculptures. scattered throughout London. It's also a coming of age story as George finds his own way in a world where he's lost his father and his mother is often away from home
  • (3/5)
    This is the first book in the Stoneheart trilogy. I was really looking forward to reading this book, the premise was very intriguing. However at 150 pages into the story I was still not all that interested or engaged with the story so I decided to stop reading it. I liked the London setting and enjoyed the idea of all the statues and sculptures coming alive for some epic battle. Unfortunately, I never engaged with any of the characters and still didn’t understand the overall plot or point of the story 150 pages in.My eleven year old son also tried reading this book before I did. He didn’t make it past the first couple chapters. He said it was creepy and boring and he just didn’t like it.Overall this was an okay book but really wasn’t for me. While there isn’t anything glaringly wrong with it, neither me or my son thought the story was very good. It was a hard book to engage in.
  • (5/5)
    Having only listened to the first disc so far, I may have to come back and revise my first impressions; but, though usually hard to please, I'm very enthusiastic so far. Besides the reader's (Jim Dale) high quality, I noticed right away that I was well able to visualize all of the nuances of action. That reflects Fletchers' success as a screenwriter, but doesn't fully account for it. After all, a novel is a different baby. Further, his language usage is more sophisticated than typical nowadays. I've already paused several times to admire a turn of phrase. George, the main character, hasn't been rounded out yet (he's been busy fleeing for his life), but The Gunner and Adie have already shown some of their charms, not least is their mutual animosity. Adie has a lovely Scots accent, too. I'm already ordering sequels.
  • (3/5)
    This was an easy read that was sitting on my shelf and I needed to read something. It is quick paced, but a little boring but still an alright book.
  • (5/5)
    This book is good. People who like action and suspence should read this book.
  • (2/5)
    Have you ever heard the old saying, "Things are not often what they appear to be"? Well this book describes just that as Charlie Fletcher takes readers in an adventure into a realm where statues are alive and run free.After being framed and punished for something he didn't do, twelve-year-old George Chapman's frustration lead him to punch the head off the dragon museum monument, he gets transported unconsciously into another realm where statues are alive. He learns this the hard way as a stone pterodactyl unpeels itself from the wall and starts chasing George with a death wish on him. Luckily he gets saved from a "Spit" a living statue of a person they memorise who is known as "the Gunner". The Gunner then explains to George that he is in "un-London" and that the spits and the taints- evil statues with no souls, are in a war. Not long after that, George meets a girl named Edie who is a "Glint". A person who sees the statues of un-London and can read the history of any stone they touch just by touching it. The trio then go on an extremely terrifying adventure to stop the war between the spits and taints.The theme of this book is to be loyal, as the main characters have to be loyal to themselves and to each other to stop the war.The idea of gargoyles coming to life and start attacking people really appeals to me however, this book didn't meet my expectations as a reader since the flow of the book was too choppy so I had a hard time getting into this book.
  • (4/5)
    I have always loved sculptures. I can remember visiting the museum with my parents as a little girl and being truly frightened by some of the more monstrous images carved in stone, with their malicious smiles that exposed far too many teeth for my small child imagination. I think deep down I was always afraid they were going to suddenly come alive. In Stoneheart, that is exactly what happens to George Chapman, a 12 year-old English boy who expresses his frustration in the wrong way at the wrong time.George is in the middle of a school field trip to the Natural History Museum in London when in a fit of anger he breaks a piece off the facade of the museum, and suddenly finds himself pursued by a stone pterodactyl, intent on his destruction. The worst part? No one else can see a thing, except for Edie, a mysterious girl who has been cursed with seeing such things for reasons she doesn't understand. George is saved by the statue of a WW1 gunner, and learns that he has found himself in the middle of a war. Within London is "unLondon," where the statues made in human form, "spits," have long fought against the "taints," sculptures of gargoyles, dragons, and other non-human creatures. George and Edie struggle to understand the rules of this strange "unLondon," not knowing who or what they can trust.I really liked this book, for both the concept and execution. Fletcher has done a great job of describing London. I was very interested to read in the author's note that all of the statues he has included in the book are actually in existence. I must admit, it made me want to visit some of them for myself. I would highly recommend this book to readers who are looking for an intense adventure. Because of the intense peril and scary situations experienced by George and Edie (which the author describes in very vivid and descriptive language) I wouldn't recommend this book for younger readers. I am looking forward to the next book in the series.
  • (4/5)
    Fantasy set in modern London. From book "A city has many lives and layers. London has more than most. Not all the layers are underground, and not all the lives belong to the living." Twelve-year-old George Chapman breaks the head off a stone dragon and his adventure begins. Georges action upset the fragile trues of the stone statues and carvings of modern London. He must survive attacks by stone gargoyles, dragons and other soulless creations to make restorations for the turmoil he has caused.
  • (4/5)
    A pretty good fantasy at about middle school level.. George breaks the head off of a stone dragon and his world begins to change. Suddenly, he can see that statues are alive. Not only that, he is in danger; some statues are out to kill him while others help him. I was a bit disappointed by the non-ending. You are brought to the brink of the story, but have to wait for the sequel.
  • (3/5)
    Clever and inventive, with an interestingly damaged hero and heroine. I can't work out why the book failed fully to engage me.
  • (4/5)
    Surprisingly good YA fantasy that tells the story of a boy named George and his descent into an"alternate" London. Fletcher plots with great assurance, but his writing style is somewhat less assured, at least in the advance proof that I read. Despite this small flaw, I found this book to be a very compelling and inventive read.
  • (5/5)
    Squee!!! Getting the next book RIGHT NOW.
  • (4/5)
    George and Edie have to work together and separately against the Walker who appears to be set against them. It's interesting to see the different statues taking sides in the fight and how George has to face up to several fears. Still it's a bridging novel and it's largely setting up what happens in the final novel in the trilogy.
  • (4/5)
    Stoneheart is a wonderful young adult series about a London boy named George who awakens evil forces when he breaks the head off of a stone dragon during a temper tantrum. George enters a new world where statues come to life and are divided into 2 camps - human statues who help George make reparations and try to fix the world and evil animal statues (like dragons and gargoyles). Ironhand is the 2nd book in the trilogy. Although it is not as exciting or captivating as Stoneheart, the fast pace continues with many plot twists. The audio version is superbly narrated by Jim Dale who creates an entire cast of voices from Gargoyles to a stuttering Samuel Johnson. The book takes you all over London and will definitely make you want to get out your suitcase and see the famous sites (and their statues) for yourself. Now onto book 3... Silvertongue.