Editor’s Note

“An incredible narrator...”

Narrated by David Suchet, who absolutely nails Poirot’s French-Belgian accent, as well as the mixed bag of voices that make up the twelve passengers, the audio version of this classic whodunnit really shines.
Scribd Editor

From the Publisher

Just after midnight, a snowstorm stops the Orient Express dead in its tracks in the middle of Yugoslavia. The luxurious train is surprisingly full for this time of year. But by morning there is one passenger less. A 'respectable American gentleman' lies dead in his compartment, stabbed a dozen times, his door locked from the inside . . . Hercule Poirot is also aboard, having arrived in the nick of time to claim a second-class compartment-and the most astounding case of his illustrious career.

This title was previously published as Murder in the Calais Coach.

Published: HarperAudio on
ISBN: 0062689665
Unabridged
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