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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

The definitive guide to working with -- and surviving -- bullies, creeps, jerks, tyrants, tormentors, despots, backstabbers, egomaniacs, and all the other assholes who do their best to destroy you at work.

"What an asshole!"

How many times have you said that about someone at work? You're not alone! In this groundbreaking book, Stanford University professor Robert I. Sutton builds on his acclaimed Harvard Business Review article to show you the best ways to deal with assholes...and why they can be so destructive to your company. Practical, compassionate, and in places downright funny, this guide offers:
-Strategies on how to pinpoint and eliminate negative influences for good
-Illuminating case histories from major organizations
-A self-diagnostic test and a program to identify and keep your own "inner jerk" from coming out

Published: Hachette Audio on
ISBN: 9780316030182
Abridged
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