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E. Aster Bunnymund and the Warrior Eggs at the Earth's Core!

E. Aster Bunnymund and the Warrior Eggs at the Earth's Core!

Ditulis oleh William Joyce

Diceritakan oleh Gerard Doyle


E. Aster Bunnymund and the Warrior Eggs at the Earth's Core!

Ditulis oleh William Joyce

Diceritakan oleh Gerard Doyle

peringkat:
4.5/5 (10 peringkat)
Panjangnya:
3 hours
Dirilis:
Feb 21, 2012
ISBN:
9781442349247
Format:
Buku Audio

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Deskripsi

Forget the bunny trail. E. Aster Bunnymund is on a warpath. In this second chapter book in William Joyce’s The Guardians series, sometimes you have to crack a few eggs.

Pitch, the Nightmare King, and his Fearlings had been soundly driven back by Nicholas St. North and company in the first Guardians’ adventure. But now Pitch has disappeared completely—and out of sight does NOT make for out of mind. It seems certain that he’s plotting a particularly nefarious revenge, and the Guardians suspect he might have gone underground. But how can they find him there?

Enter E. Aster Bunnymund, the only emissary of the fabled brotherhood of the Pookas—the league of philosophical warrior rabbits of imposing intellect and size. Highly skilled in martial arts (many of which he invented himself), Bunnymund is brilliant, logical, and a tunnel-digger extraordinaire. If the Guardians need paths near the Earth’s core, he’s their Pooka. He’s also armed with magnificent weapons of an oval-sort, and might just be able to help in the quest for the second piece of the Moonclipper.

This second book in The Guardians series is about much more than fixing a few rotten eggs—it brings the Guardians one step closer to defeating Pitch!

Dirilis:
Feb 21, 2012
ISBN:
9781442349247
Format:
Buku Audio

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Tentang penulis

William Joyce does a lot of stuff but children’s books are his true bailiwick (The Guardians series, Dinosaur Bob series, George Shrinks, and the #1 New York Times bestselling The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore, which is also his Academy Award–winning short film, to name a few). He lives in Shreveport, Louisiana. Talk to William Joyce and see upcoming work at @HeyBillJoyce on Twitter and Instagram.

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4.3
10 peringkat / 9 Ulasan
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  • (4/5)
    I gave this story a four star because it doesn't introduce E.Aster Bunnymund till the middle of the story. Beside that it was a good story. I think that the stories plot was good for the most part. I think the best part was when they fought Pitch.Pitch has attacked and turned every one in the village into ceramic dolls except for the children which he takes hostage. To get them back North teams up with E.Aster Bunnymund to rescue them. As they rescue them they have a big fight with Pitch. And in the end they win and get back the children.
  • (5/5)
    William Joyce returns with a second volume in his Guardians of Childhood series, this one even more delightful than the first (if that were possible). The mysterious Pooka, Bunnymund, adds a lot to the story, and while the final confrontation feels a little bit thin, the journey getting there is an awful lot of fun. Joyce is clearly in his element with these tales, and their slightly old-fashioned quality is very appealing to anyone who grew up on early 20th century children's literature. (There are clearly some old-fashioned references, too: the idea of the Pooka, while mythological in origin, is almost certainly distilled by Joyce via the film Harvey, and there's a laugh-out-loud-if-you-recognize-it dialogue steal from Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles).Plus, this is the first story I've read that adequately explains the Easter Bunny's fascination with chocolate - despite the fact he never eats any! Joyce continues to mine those little childhood "why"s and "what-if"s we take for granted as adults for charming story material. I look forward to the next in the series.
  • (5/5)
    Awesome! I love this series and can't wait to see the movie in November! William Joyce is an excellent storyteller. The action is so detailed and the magic feels so real and you can't help but love all the characters. I'm normally a slow reader but this series is so good that I find myself zipping through pages just to find out what happens next. Well book one put a twist on the Santa legend and this book brought the Easter bunny to a whole nether level. Can't wait to see what he does with the tooth fairy which in book 3!
  • (4/5)
    I just love the story of the Easter Bunny that Joyce has come up with for the second book in the Guardians of Childhood series. E Aster Bunnymund joins North, Ombric, Nightlight and Katherine in the fight against Pitch, The Nightmare King. The story is whimsical, fun, exciting and innovative. It will certainly capture its readers' imaginations and send them barreling into the center of the earth with the Guardians on their mission to destroy Pitch. The warrior eggs were such an imaginative creation and I love the reinvention of the Easter bunny as a warrior Pooka.

    The combination of descriptive writing and the amazing illustrations will keep children rereading these novels for years to come. Really fantastic and can't wait for the next in the series.
  • (5/5)
    I originally got this book to read to the grandkids in segments. However, at an inch thick, and only one of the series, it is really for kids in the 11 to 14 year age bracket in m opinion.However I like the imagination of the author's story. The plot is exciting and should be a good choice for that early teen bracket.I plan n reading the other two in this series, just for myself, until my grandkids are a little older when they will be ready for them.
  • (4/5)
    I greatly enjoyed returning to the world of the Guardians after finishing the tale of Nicholas St. North. Casting the "Easter Bunny" as E. Aster Bunnymund, a Pooka, was an inspired choice by author William Joyce. The plot was exciting and also moved the mythology of the world along as well. I cannot wait to start "Toothania" and learn about the origins of the lady we knew in childhood as the "Tooth Fairy".
  • (4/5)
    The more I read them, the more I realize what William Joyce is doing with his Guardians series. To the casual reader, it may seem like a bunch of notable ?imaginary creatures? (e.g., Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, etc.) are teaming up to fight evil and defend childhood, but in actuality Joyce is building his own Avengers or Justice League or League of Extraordinary Gentlemen out of notable Western folk heroes. For someone who likes crossovers and teamups, this is most definitely my cup of tea.In the second novel in his series (which currently includes three novels, two storybooks, a short film, and an upcoming feature-length film), we are introduced to the Easter Bunny, or, A. Aster Bunnymund, a Pooka. His fate intersects with those of the established guardians (a future Santa Claus notably among them) as they battle Pitch, the Nightmare King. Having taken a millenial-long hands-off approach to humanity, he finally decides to change his ways and join up with these heroes to help defend and protect childhood.While Joyce presents the characters we know and love as parts of our culture, especially those personae associate with major holidays (though, if you want Krampus, you?ll have to read books by Brom instead of Joyce), he does so in a way that isn?t annoying to someone sick to death of rehashes of old ideas (how many retellings of Alice in Wonderland are there?). He blends enough originality and creativity to give the intelligent reader something to grin about (a shared secret regarding who?s whom) and the standard reader something to think about.While I enjoyed the book, I felt that it could have introduced Bunnymund sooner, as he was the subject of the story. Ultimately, it was more ?Nicholas St. North Enlists a Pooka to Battle the Nightmare King at the Center of the Earth!? than anything else. But that?s not necessarily a bad thing; only a different thing. Something, I would imagine, that would give even the intelligent reader something to think about.I look forward to future installments in this series.
  • (5/5)
    Book two of the Guardians of Childhood series features E. Aster Bunnymund, the last of the ancient race of Pookas with a penchant for chocolate eggs. :) The story gets more complex and the villain manages to get stronger. I enjoy how the author plays with real life myths and lore and weaves it into the story. Easter Island is really a gateway into E. Aster's underground warren...
  • (4/5)
    Reason for Reading: Next in the series.Another wonderful entry in this fabulous series which harkens back to the fantasy of L. Frank Baum, both in its whimsical early 19th century brand of fantasy and in its style of writing which includes chapter titles such as "Wherein the Friends Must Separate" and " In Which There Is a Fearful Discovery and a Whisper of Hope". The story continues on from Book One which ended happily but left a quest unfulfilled. All our old friends are back again as they search for the second artifact and it is this journey which leads them to Bunnymund and his steampunk world of egg-shaped machines. A delight to read, this book (and series) is especially aimed at that special age of 7-11. As I've remarked before, not since the Spiderwick Chronicles have I been so taken with the whimsy of a fantastical setting and story. This would also make a great read aloud, though there is a touch of darkness that may frighten younger or sensitive children. The illustrations continue to be superb and it is the combination of the text and artwork that makes this series so appealing.