From the Publisher

"The magnificence of Hold It 'Til It Hurts is not only in the prose and the story but also in the book's great big beating heart. These complex and compelling characters and the wizardry of Johnson's storytelling will dazzle and move you from first page to last. Novels don't teach us how to live but Hold It 'Til It Hurts will make you hush and wonder."-- Anthony Swofford, author of Jarhead "This rich and sophisticated first novel brings together pleasures rarely found in one book: Hold It 'Til It Hurts is a novel about war that goes in search of passionate love, a dreamy thriller, a sprawling mystery, a classical quest for a lost brother in which the shadowy quarry is clearly the seeker's own self, and a meditation on family and racial identity that makes its forerunners in American fiction look innocent by comparison."-- Jaimy Gordon, National Book Award winner for Lord of Misrule "Hold It 'Til It Hurts is the kind of impressive debut that marks its author, T. Geronimo Johnson, as a writer with a career that bears watching."-- Stuart Dybek When Achilles Conroy and his brother Troy return from a tour of duty in Afghanistan, their white mother presents them with the key to their past: envelopes containing details about their respective birth parents. After Troy disappears, Achilles-always his brother's keeper-embarks on a harrowing journey in search of Troy, an experience that will change him forever. Heartbreaking, intimate, and at times disturbing, Hold It 'Til It Hurts is a modern-day odyssey through war, adventure, disaster, and love, and explores how people who do not define themselves by race make sense of a world that does.
Published: Recorded Books Audio on
ISBN: 9781470366421
Unabridged
Listen on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Hold It Til It Hurts
With a 30 day free trial you can listen to one free audiobook per month

    Related Articles

    TIME
    2 min read

    A Death in the Family Inspires Two Works of Art

    RADHIKA JONES THE PARTY SCENE THAT OPENS Ann Patchett’s new novel unspools like a home movie. A lawyer from the L.A. district attorney’s office, Albert Cousins, crashes the christening celebration of baby Frances, second daughter of L.A. cop Fix Keating. Bert brings a bottle of gin; Beverly, Fix’s wife, halves oranges from the backyard for cocktails. Their collaboration on an assembly line of freshly squeezed drinks leads to an affair that breaks up two families—and joins them. It’s chaotic in the moment, but the patina of time reveals a graceful choreography. Commonwealth’s family saga, whi
    New York Magazine
    1 min read

    The Controversial Rachel Cusk

    MOST DIVISIVE A Life’s Work (2001) Cusk’s elegy for her pre-motherhood self infuriates mothers and critics alike. “This isn’t what it’s like to have a baby; it’s what it’s like for a depressed and melodramatic novelist to have a baby.” (THE SUNDAY TIMES) Aftermath (2012) An unsentimental look at her divorce from her stay-at-home husband. “This is writerly greed, swooping on everything and wringing meaning from it, transforming it into something else rather than just letting it be.” (THE GUARDIAN) “Every experience, from having a tooth extracted to Cusk’s daughters’ hamsters’ inability to
    Foreign Policy
    5 min read

    Does the World Really Need Nation-States?

    To CHIGOZIE OBIOMA, there is more to writing fiction than crafting engaging characters and plots. Writers, he says, have an opportunity to assess and critique the world in which they live. The 2015 Global Thinker’s debut novel, The Fishermen, is a domestic drama about sibling rivalry, but it’s also an allegory for Nigeria’s destructive colonial legacy. TAIYE SELASI, though, finds value in literary stories that singularly explore interior landscapes, free of societal or political metaphor. To that end, her acclaimed 2013 novel, Ghana Must Go, delves into an immigrant family dealing with the dea