From the Publisher

America's favorite football player turned morning talk show host Michael Strahan reads his book of motivational advice on how to turn up the heat and go from good to great in pursuit of your personal ambition.

Michael Strahan spent his childhood on a military base in Europe, where community meant everything, and life, though idyllic, was different. For one, when people referenced football they meant soccer. So when Michael's father suggested he work toward a college scholarship by playing football in Texas, where tens of thousands of people show up for a weekend game, the odds were long. Yet he did, indeed, land a scholarship and from there a draft into the NFL where he scaled the league's heights, broke records, and helped his team win the Super Bowl as a result of which he was inducted into the Hall of Fame. How? By developing "Strahan's Rules"-a mix of mental discipline, positive thinking, and a sense of play. He also used the Rules to forge a successful post pro-ball career as cohost with Kelly Ripa on Live!-a position for which he was considered the longshot-and much more.

In Wake Up Happy, Michael shares personal stories about how he gets and stays motivated and how you can do the same in your quest to attain your life goals.

Here are a few of "Strahan's Rules":

1) Listen to other people, but don't take their opinions for fact. Have your own experiences. Draw your own conclusions.

2) You can't change other people but you can change how you act around them. Usually, that's more than enough.

3) Don't pre-judge. Help can-and will-come from the most unexpected places. Be open to everything around you.

Inspiring and chock full of advice that will help you make significant strides toward pursuing your dream, Wake Up Happy is a book no one, young or old, male or female will want to miss.
Published: Simon & Schuster Audio on
ISBN: 9781442397903
Unabridged
Listen on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Wake Up Happy by Veronica Chambers and Michael Strahan
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