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From the Publisher

There's more to meditation than just rhythmically chanting "Om" in a seated position - inner calm can be achieved through the simplest of actions, such as mindfully drinking a cup of tea. This guide shows you how to harness the power of meditation in your daily life with a variety of meditation techniques that you can learn and carry out in just a few minutes. From breathing exercises that can help you quickly calm down in a stressful situation to mantras that can help you state your intentions for the day, every page offers powerful techniques, showing you effective ways to boost your mood, manage worries, and get a good night's sleep. Featuring more than 50 easy-to-follow guided meditations, Meditation Made Easy helps lead you toward peace, tranquility, and a more relaxed life.
Published: Vibrance Press Audio on
ISBN: 9781624613111
Unabridged
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