Temukan buku favorit Anda berikutnya

Jadilah anggota hari ini dan baca gratis selama 30 hari
Dear Mr. Henshaw

Dear Mr. Henshaw

Baca pratinjau

Dear Mr. Henshaw

peringkat:
4/5 (189 peringkat)
Panjangnya:
91 pages
1 hour
Penerbit:
Dirilis:
Oct 6, 2009
ISBN:
9780061972157
Format:
Buku

Deskripsi

Written by Scribd Editors

From critically acclaimed and beloved Newbery Medal Winner Beverly Cleary comes a beautiful young adult story about ten-year-old Leigh who, in letters to his favorite author, reveals his problems in coping with his parents' divorce, being the new boy in school, and generally finding his own place in the world.

Struggling to make friends and deal with his anger toward his absent father, Leigh loses himself in a class assignment in which he must write to his favorite author. When Mr. Henshaw responds, the two form an unexpected friendship that will change Leigh's life forever.

From the beloved author of the Henry Huggins, Ramona Quimby, and Ralph S. Mouse series comes an epistolary novel about how to navigate and heal from life's growing pains.

Penerbit:
Dirilis:
Oct 6, 2009
ISBN:
9780061972157
Format:
Buku

Tentang penulis

Beverly Cleary is one of America's most beloved authors. As a child, she struggled with reading and writing. But by third grade, after spending much time in her public library in Portland, Oregon, she found her skills had greatly improved. Before long, her school librarian was saying that she should write children's books when she grew up. Instead she became a librarian. When a young boy asked her, "Where are the books about kids like us?" she remembered her teacher's encouragement and was inspired to write the books she'd longed to read but couldn't find when she was younger. She based her funny stories on her own neighborhood experiences and the sort of children she knew. And so, the Klickitat Street gang was born! Mrs. Cleary's books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the American Library Association's Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, presented to her in recognition of her lasting contribution to children's literature. Dear Mr. Henshaw won the Newbery Medal, and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. Her characters, including Beezus and Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Ralph, the motorcycle-riding mouse, have delighted children for generations.


Terkait dengan Dear Mr. Henshaw

Buku Terkait

Pratinjau Buku

Dear Mr. Henshaw - Beverly Cleary

Publisher

Dear Mr. Henshaw

May 12

Dear Mr. Henshaw,

My teacher read your book about the dog to our class. It was funny. We licked it.

Your freind,

Leigh Botts (boy)

December 3

Dear Mr. Henshaw,

I am the boy who wrote to you last year when I was in the second grade. Maybe you didn’t get my letter. This year I read the book I wrote to you about called Ways to Amuse a Dog. It is the first thick book with chapters that I have read.

The boy’s father said city dogs were bored so Joe could not keep the dog unless he could think up seven ways to amuse it. I have a black dog. His name is Bandit. He is a nice dog.

If you answer I get to put your letter on the bulletin board.

My teacher taught me a trick about friend. The i goes before e so that at the end it will spell end.

Keep in tutch.

Your friend,

Leigh (Lēē) Botts

November 13

Dear Mr. Henshaw,

I am in the fourth grade now. I made a diorama of Ways to Amuse a Dog, the book I wrote to you about two times before. Now our teacher is making us write to authors for Book Week. I got your answer to my letter last year, but it was only printed. Please would you write to me in your own handwriting? I am a great enjoyer of your books.

My favorite character in the book was Joe’s Dad because he didn’t get mad when Joe amused his dog by playing a tape of a lady singing, and his dog sat and howled like he was singing, too. Bandit does the same thing when he hears singing.

Your best reader,

Leigh Botts

December 2

Dear Mr. Henshaw,

I got to thinking about Ways to Amuse a Dog. When Joe took his dog to the park and taught him to slide down the slide, wouldn’t some grownup come along and say he couldn’t let his dog use the slide? Around here grownups, who are mostly real old with cats, get mad if dogs aren’t on leashes every minute. I hate living in a mobile home park.

I saw your picture on the back of the book. When I grow up I want to be a famous book writer with a beard like you.

I am sending you my picture. It is last year’s picture. My hair is longer now. With all the millions of kids in the U. S., how would you know who I am if I don’t send you my picture?

Your favorite reader,

Leigh Botts

Enclosure: Picture of me. (We are studying business letters.)

October 2

Dear Mr. Henshaw,

I am in the fifth grade now. You might like to know that I gave a book report on Ways to Amuse a Dog. The class liked it. I got an A-. The minus was because the teacher said I didn’t stand on both feet.

Sincerely,

Leigh Botts

November 7

Dear Mr. Henshaw,

I got your letter and did what you said. I read a different book by you. I read Moose on Toast. I liked it almost as much as Ways to Amuse a Dog. It was really funny the way the boy’s mother tried to think up ways to cook the moose meat they had in their freezer. 1000 pounds is a lot of moose. Mooseburgers, moose stew and moose meat loaf don’t sound too bad. Maybe moose mincemeat pie would be OK because with all the raisins and junk you wouldn’t know you were eating moose. Creamed chipped moose on toast, yuck.

I don’t think the boy’s father should have shot the moose, but I guess there are plenty of moose up there in Alaska, and maybe they needed it for food.

If my Dad shot a moose I would feed the tough parts to my dog Bandit.

Your number 1 fan,

Leigh Botts

September 20

Dear Mr. Henshaw,

This year I am in the sixth grade in a new school in a different town. Our teacher is making us do author reports to improve our writing skills, so of course I thought of you. Please answer the following questions.

How many books have you written?

Is Boyd Henshaw your real name or is it fake?

Why do you write books for children?

Where do you get your ideas?

Do you have any kids?

What is your favorite book that you wrote?

Do you like to write books?

What is the title of your next book?

What is your favorite animal?

Please give me some tips on how to write a book. This is important to me. I really want to know so I can get to be a famous author and write books exactly like yours.

Please send me a list of your books that you wrote, an autographed picture and a bookmark. I need your answer by next Friday. This is urgent!

Sincerely,

Leigh Botts

De Liver

De Letter

De Sooner

De Better

De Later

De Letter

De Madder

I Getter

November 15

Dear Mr. Henshaw,

At first I was pretty upset when I didn’t get an answer to my letter in time for my report, but I worked it out OK. I read what it said about you on the back of Ways to Amuse a Dog and wrote real big on every other line so I filled up the paper. On the book it said you lived in Seattle, so I didn’t know you had moved to Alaska although I should have guessed

Anda telah mencapai akhir pratinjau ini. Daftar untuk membaca lebih lanjut!
Halaman 1 dari 1

Ulasan

Pendapat orang tentang Dear Mr. Henshaw

4.1
189 peringkat / 69 Ulasan
Apa pendapat Anda?
Penilaian: 0 dari 5 bintang

Ulasan pembaca

  • (2/5)
    At least twice during school, my reading textbook contained an excerpt from this. And both times it was the part where the boy gets to go to lunch with an author. Now I finally read it.That excerpt is nothing like the book.Well, maybe a little. It is about a young boy who writes letters to an author. They start as “fan mail/questions”. Then it becomes personal stuff about his life–way too personal–that transforms into essentially a diary, or shouting into the wind. And it’s in epistolary format, so it’s fun to see his writing style evolve over time. I was under the impression that Mr. Henshaw never responds to the boy, but in fact he does. You just don’t see those responses. But writing is not what the book is about.It’s about his coming to terms with his parents’ divorce and his deadbeat truck driver father. A bit cliche now, but not so much when this was written. I don’t know why, but something felt off about this book. Maybe it was my expectations that it would be about a boy becoming a writer and then being delivered a bildrungsoman. Maybe I couldn’t much relate to the boy. He’s living in a trailer and he’s constantly talking about his father–if he’s going to come visit, if he’s going to call, what he’s doing with their dog, who was that woman who answered the phone, and so on. Something’s lacking–either charm or wit or levity. It seems bleak. It seems like the moral is “adults are shits and there’s nothing you can do about it, kid”. It’s a solid idea, but lacks plot. So it comes off whiny. I imagine this is the kid who grew up to become J.D. Salinger.
  • (5/5)
    from building rainbows
    In his letters to his favorite author, ten-year-old Leigh reveals his problems in coping with his parents' divorce, being the new boy in school, and generally finding his own place in the world.
    In this story, a boy named Leigh Botts writes to a man named Mr.Henshaw. It doesn't tell his first name in the story. Leigh Botts has always written to Mr.Henshaw since he was in the third grade. It's funny how every time Leigh moves to a different grade he has to do the same work. He had to write to a writer in all his grades from third to sixth grade.

    Mr.Henshaw is a professional writer and Leigh Botts has read every one of his books. Leigh Botts wrote a letter to Mr.Henshaw about books that Mr. Henshaw had written called "Moose On Toast" and "Ways To Amuse a Dog." Mr. Henshaw did write back but with a typewriter. Leigh Botts sent Mr. Henshaw some questions and he never answered them until Leigh Botts wrote to him again.

    Finally Leigh gets answers to his questions.

    This book was published in 1983 and I cannot believe it took me this many years to read this wonderful book. I read it in one sitting. It deals with tough topics but topics very real to our students today.
  • (5/5)
    Endearing story; true to life.good for all children, not just those of divorce, but those who worry about divorce, as so many do. Good for encouraging student journaling.
  • (4/5)
    Summary: This book is composed of letters and diary entries written by a sixth grade boy named Leigh. He writes letters to Boyd Henshaw the author of his favorite book "Ways to Amuse a Dog". At first he writes the letters because his teachers want him to write letters to an author to learn more about them and their writing process. When Leigh asks Mr. Henshaw questions about his writing he responds with questions of his own. Leigh does not want to answer the questions but his mother makes him. Leigh continues to write to Mr. Henshaw about his own personal writing and how he can write his own stories. Mr. Henshaw encourages Leigh to start a diary so that he can write about his daily experiences. Through the diary entries we learn more about the divorce of Leigh's parents. We also learn that Leigh resents his dad for leaving and not calling or visiting very often. Leigh also reaches out to Mr. Henshaw because he is struggling to write something for the Young Writers' Yearbook. Mr. Henshaw helps him to realize that he needs to write from personal experiences rather than trying to copy the style of any other author. At school Leigh is struggling to make new friends and someone is always stealing food out of his lunchbox. He makes an alarm to put in his lunchbox. Through the alarm fiasco at lunch he makes a friend named Barry who he begins to spend time with. At the end of the story his father comes to visit him which makes Leigh happy.Review: I thought this book was very interesting. I had never actually read a chapter book by Beverly Cleary which is surprising because they are so popular. I liked how the whole book was written as either letters or diary entries. This seemed to help the reader follow along with the story and what was going on in relation to the time of year. I liked that the author did not include any letters written by Mr. Henshaw and we only heard bits and pieces of what he said from Leigh. This kept a sense of mystery about him especially because his letters were infrequent and they usually came in the form of a postcard. I like how the reader is able to watch Leigh grow and change throughout the story. I think Leigh is a character many students could relate to. I liked that there were a few illustrations that broke up the text but were closely related to what was going on in the story at the time.
  • (5/5)
    Realistic (but never gritty) this interesting coming-of-age story doesn't have a plot so much as a focus on Leigh's character development. Exploring themes of friendship, self-confidence, parental relationships, and the importance of creative expression, "Dear Mr. Henshaw" is another great book from an awesome author.
  • (3/5)
    Leigh Botts is given a class assignment to write to his favorite author. Instead of answering all of his questions the author, Mr. Henshaw, asks him to answer some questions about himself. In turn a correspondence between the two ensues and continues over the years. Although it is mostly one sided and Leigh does most of the correspondence, by writing he is able to better cope with life's frustrations and begins to discover who he is.
  • (5/5)
    This book is about Leigh Botts who's family is going through a divorce. Leigh is having trouble adjusting to this so he begins to write letters about his assignments to Mr. Henshaw. Leigh barley gets to see his mother who is struggling to pay the bills, and hardly gets calls from his father who is behind on payments, while this is occurring Leigh starts to write to Mr. Henshaw about his family issues. Mr. Henshaw writes back sarcastically by telling Leigh to keep a diary to vent and build his writing skills. Leigh later enters a young authors contest and gets honorable mention and also an award to get to meet a famous author. Leigh forms a relationship with his father, but also realizes that his family will never be the way it was or he wants it to be.I had never read a Beverly Cleary Book, but choose one that is non like her others. This is a well written book with a common happening among children. This is a great book for all children. I would read this book aloud to a class for many reasons, some being so they would realize that no family is "normal". I would also read it aloud to see how many students had a family that was the same as this book this way the students could share their feelings and maybe so other students could also vent about things in their families. It will be a very difficult subject but it is important to let the children know that it is ok and people are around for them to talk to if they need. Also letting the class start a vent journal is a great way for children to get their feelings out and a good tool to keep with them along the years.
  • (4/5)
    This book is a great example of realistic fiction. The way that Beverly Clear depicts the struggles that Leigh Botts (boy) is struggling with his parents seperation and struggles with school. He writes to Mr. Henshaw, an author that he likes, and begins correspondence with the author through letters. The point of view that the author chose to write in was truly a stroke of genius. It made the story all the more readable and enjoyable.
  • (1/5)
    it was stupid.
  • (3/5)
    Part of my goal of reading the Newberry Award winning books (at least the ones that came out before I turned, like, 14 or so). This is a great book for kids of divorced parents. It really gets into the head of this kid.
  • (5/5)
    Dear Mr. Henshaw is definitely one of my favorite Newbery titles. I really, really enjoyed it. I listened to it on audio with my 15 year old son, and though he is much older than the target audience, he very much enjoyed it as well.Leigh is a boy whose teacher gives him the assignment of writing to a favorite author. Leigh does and asks Mr. Henshaw some questions required of the assignment. When he gets a letter in response, Mr. Henshaw asks him a set of questions as well. Leigh continues to write Mr. Henshaw and they develop a correspondence over the years. Leigh wants to become a writer, and he asks Mr. Henshaw for writing advice but also tells him of some deeply personal events occurring at home, such as his parents’ divorce.This is an excellent book that can definitely be appreciated by both children and adults, especially if they are struggling with a major life event.Highly recommended.1983, 144 pp.
  • (5/5)
    This as a great childhood favourite, I was surprised to find that I remembered entire passages. As a boy is forced to write letters to his favourite author, we learn about his life, especially his relationship with his haphazard father.I think that this would still appeal to younger boys, I didn't find it dated at all.
  • (4/5)
    The subject of letter writing may seem like history, but this book actually made me want to reach out to someone using paper and pencil, like it used to be in the old days. I don't know that I can explain why, maybe it was the fact that the child stuck to what he was doing, even though in the beginning adults were pushing him when he wasn't really feeling it. This alone is proof to young readers that though you might not like something at first, you may find you enjoy it in the end.The story of Leigh's life isn't an easy one. He is dealing with his parents being divorced, he is dealing with the struggles of the living situation that comes with divorce, but it isn't a heavy or weighted book. There are down times and there are moments of enjoyment, there are times when he becomes angry, but there are times when things seem to be going okay and there is nothing to be frustrated about. Through the letter writing we learn a lot about Leigh's situation, his feelings, and his desire to be a writer.An excellent book for young readers who want to be authors some day or for children in single parent households. The unique style of the writing (the book is basically a collection of letters and diary entries) helps to encourage the reader to envision themselves as a part of the story or to apply it to their lives. Easy to see why it won the Newbery Award.
  • (5/5)
    It is written in first person by a nine year old boy named Leigh Botts. He writes letters to his favorite author as a way to cope with his parents divorce. It chronicles the life of Leigh through sadness and disappointment while dealing with ordinary problems.
  • (5/5)
    I read this book a long time ago, when I was still in grade school. It was one of my favourite books, so I was deeply upset when a friend lost it. Over the years, I still thought of the book and the way it made me feel. Imagine how happy I was when I saw it at a local bookstore here in Kuala Lumpur, 15 years later, with the same cover of the version I used to own. This is one of those books that even adults can enjoy. Being sad and trying to cope with life is not exclusively for adults, even kids get those blues too.
  • (3/5)
    Dear Mr. Henshaw is a book about a young boy who has gone through the divorce of his parents and is struggling to deal with the divorce. Leigh writes to his favorite author Mr. Henshaw explaining his feelings to him about the divorce and other problems he is facing. I love this book and I remember reading it when I was ten years old. Beverley Clearly was one of my favorite authors when I was younger and I still enjoyed reading this book again. Leigh finds his own way to feel better by expressing himself in his journal. I think this book would be a good book for children whose parents are going through a divorce and are having a hard time expressing how they feel. I think a good idea would be for each student to have their own personal journal to express their feelings.
  • (5/5)
    A sixth-grade boy deals with his parents' divorce, feelings for his negligent and absent father, losing his dog, moving to a new school, and having the best part of his lunch stolen most days. The story is told through the boy's letters to a famous children's author, Mr. Henshaw, and through his journal. Writing helps the boy explore his feelings. This is an excellent book for young writers, children trying to resolve problems, children dealing with divorce or a new school. Well written; another Cleary classic.
  • (4/5)
    This book follows the life of Leigh Botts, a young boy with divorced parents who writes letters to his favorite author in an attempt to cope with loneliness and the pain he feels from his parents’ divorce. The story reads like Leigh’s diary, as he reveals his secret struggles. A Newbery medal winner, this book is an enjoyable account of a young boy’s journey growing up.
  • (4/5)
    Leigh is lonely because his Dad is a trucker and away most of the time; his mother, since the divorce, works all day at Katy’s Catering to make rent and pay the bills. Leigh begins writing to Mr. Henshaw, the author of Ways to Amuse a Dog, his favorite book. He wants to be a writer, and though Mr. Henshaw is at first a be grumpy in his replies, I think he actually begins to give Leigh good advice, as he begins to see through Leigh’s perseverance in writing to him, that he is dedicated, talented, and in need of a friend.If You Liked This, Try: Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson, Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli, Number the Starts by Lois Lowry, Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell.Awards: Newbery
  • (5/5)
    Stars: Point of viewAge: IntermediateThis book is a good example of realistic fiction, because all of the events that happen to Leigh in this book could happen in real life. Readers would be able to relate to the many realistic elements, such as a young boy dealing with the divorce of his parents, idolizing an author, struggling to make friends at school, and worrying about his lunch being stolen. However, this book is fictional because Leigh and his family do not actually exist.
  • (5/5)
    Beverly Cleary tells the story of Lea Botts as he deals with his parents' divorce, his fathers absence, and a lunch theif. Encouraged by his favorite author, Lea learns to work through his troubles through journaling.
  • (4/5)
    This Newbery Award winner of 1984 can still be used to inspire young student writers, children whose parents have difficulty getting along or are divorced, and children who are picked on. The book is structured around what starts out as a correspondence between 6th grader Leigh Botts and a writer that he admires, Mr. Henshaw. When Mr. Henshaw suggests that he can’t keep up a correspondence with the boy, he suggests Leigh keep a journal in which to write his thoughts and ideas. This transition from writing fan letters to keeping a journal where the author becomes less important occurs effectively and believably. Leigh’s observations and expressions of his feelings regarding his parents and ongoing frustrations with his lunch thief sound authentically 6th grade, even though the book is close to being 30 years old. Leigh’s growth and maturation make this story a good choice especially for boys who might have frustrations of their own. It is positive without being sappy. Target audience grades 4-6. Cleary, B., Zelinsky, P. O., & Juvenile Collection (Library of Congress). (1983). Dear Mr. Henshaw. New York: Morrow.
  • (3/5)
    I liked this book, for what it was, and I can totally see why it won the Newbery. It was a cute, fun, fast read that actually made me laugh out loud a few times. I am impressed how Cleary chose to change formats in the book from a letter, to more of a diary style. It would have been so easy to stick with one format through out, but I like the way it showed growth for the character. The black and white illustrations were wonderful, and I was sucked in from the beginning by the characters voice. If I was an 8 year old boy, I would be hooked. =D
  • (5/5)
    "Dear Mr. Henshaw" is about a young boy named Leigh who wrote to his favorite author Mr. Henshaw over the course of two years. He started sending the letters for class assignments but then started telling about his personal struggles and his family life. Mr. Henshaw suggested that Leigh should start keeping a diary to vent and develop his writing skills. The diary was theraputic for Leigh and did indeed increase his writing abilities. In the end he recieved an honorabble mention for one of his stories and was able to come to terms with his family life.I realy enjoyed this book. I think it touches on a lot of problems many children face. I enjoyed seeing how Leigh's spelling and grammar progressed throughout the book.I would make this book appart of my curriculum. For an asignment I would ask my student to start keeping a journal which would be submitted a few times a week.
  • (4/5)
    This story is about a young boy named Leigh Botts. He reminds me of my son. The reason for this is because I am a divorced woman raising my son with the love of God and myself. My son does not write to his favorite author but he does write. He writes stories about his experiences from school and his every day life. My son is not lonely in school like this young man but sometimes he is sad. My son was sad about my divorce, like this young man, but he has flourished and is growing into a wonderful teenager. I can relate to this book and I may have my son read this book for some bibliotherapy.
  • (4/5)
    In this Newberry award winning book by Beverly Cleary, a young boy begins writing back and forth with his favorite author after being assigned to do so by his teacher. At first, the letters are one sided with no response from the author, Mr. Henshaw. The boy, Leigh Botts, is diligent about writing Mr. Henshaw and ulitmately begins to get some response in the form of postcards and a few letters. Leigh relates to Mrs. Henshaw that he wants to become a famous author like him. When asked what he should do to become an author, Mr. Henshaw simply replies, "write!" Mr. Henshaw gives Leigh a set of questions to answer. At first, Leigh is mad because it feels to him like another school assignment. When the family's television breaks, Leigh begrudingly decides to use his time to answer Mr. Henshaw's questions. As Leigh writes letters and answers the questions, it is revealed among other things that he is a young boy dealing with the divorce of his parents. For the remainder of the book, Leigh goes back and forth from writing real lettes to Mr. Henshaw to keeping a diary in which he begins each entry to a pretend Mr. Henshaw. The book concludes with an opportunity for Leigh to meet a real author who in turn calls him an author, and an opportunity to gain some understanding of his relationship with his often unengaged father.I enjoyed reading this book to my daughter who just finished 2nd grade. The format of the book as a series of letters and diary entries was very interesting. My daughter and I could hardly put down the book each night. In fact, we only stopped reading when my daughter fell asleep. We have enjoyed reading many of Beverly Cleary's books. We also feel somewhat of a special connection to her as she has (now grown) twin children (a boy and girl) and my daughter has a twin brother. Cleary does a good job of capturing the thoughts and emotions of a child dealing with real life issues. From dealing with a bully to navigating the relationships in a struggling family, the characters and their interactions seem quite genuine.
  • (3/5)
    In this 1984 Newbery Medal winner, second grade student Lee Botts is given the assignment of writing to his favorite author. He asks questions to Boyd Henshaw and in turn Mr. Henshaw asks questions to Lee.Over the course of four years, as Lee and Mr. Henshaw communicate, Lee learns the power of writing and expressing feelings via words.The sad, lonely, new kid on the block shares his feelings with Mr. Henshaw, and over the course of years, also writes in diary form. As he grapples with his parents divorce, acclimation to a new school and abandonment by his father, Cleary wisely allows us into the thoughts and feelings of a vulnerable young man.While this isn't one of my favorite Newbery winners, it was a pleasant read.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: This is a intriguing display of short stories as told and felt by a nine year old boy. He fights his writng assignments until he finds special interest in a favorite author. He writes to this author to complete an assignment, but continues exploring this relationship throughout the book. He is very matter of fact with is feelings to the author, as he gradually progresses from 3rd grader to a 5th grader, who is working through all those growing pains.Review: From being a child with 2 parents and a dog, this young boy becomes up-rooted to a new home, town, and peers. Soon, he finds he can't begin to fully trust these new peers, until he solves his new, big lunch delimma. Through this quest he goes from being a zero to a hero, gains a good friend, and makes friends with "himself", forgives his parents, and writes an award winning short essay/story. Truly a five star book and a very good, must read chapter book.Extension idea: This book has so many great extension ideas. The book is useful in preparing to write a review, learning to collect your thoughts, unfriendly peers, changing homes, schools, routines, growing up, and journalizing.
  • (5/5)
    12 year old Leigh has been writing to Mr. Henshaw off and on since a school assignment in 2nd grade mandated he contact a published author. Now in 6th grade, Leigh begins writing in earnest--ostensibly for another school project-- revealing the unhappy details of his life. It is Mr Henshaw's brief, but thoughtful, response that leads Leigh to start keeping a letter-journal and it is through these letters--some sent (Dear Real Mr. Henshaw) and some journaled (Dear Fake Mr. Henshaw) that we learn about his struggle with his parents recent divorce and separation, the move to a new house, a new school, his loneliness, and the unreliable father that he loves and misses. As in real life, things improve for Leigh by the end of the book--he meets a new friend and comes to terms with the new living situation but, just as important, there is no happily ever after and his parents do not get back together----instead, they all move on. Well written and brilliant--this is a great book for individual reading and for book club and class room discussions. The issues of divorce and unhappiness and alienation are very common in YA books, but much less so for this age level--when many children are aware of family issues but do not know how to talk about them, leaving them full of fear and anxiety. Thoughtful and moving, Dear Mr. Henshaw is popular and well received by children and adults and serves as a great introduction to the works of Beverly Cleary. Recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Dear Mr. Henshaw is about a boy named Leigh who writes to his favorite author. He tells Mr. Henshaw about his struggles and his thoughts and feelings. Mr. Henshaw writes back to Leigh and tries to put him on the right career path. He tells Leigh that if he wants to be an author then he need to write. Leigh’s parents just got a divorce and he never really sees his father. His mom works with a catere who always puts unique but very delicious food in his lunch. Leigh does not get to eat it though because someone takes it. This is a very good book. While I was reading it, it felt like I was actually the one who was writing the letters. The story line is very realistic and is relatable with a lot of people. It had real feelings and how Leigh dealt with it.I would use this in the classroom by using it as an English assignment. There are a few different style of letters in this book. I would make assignments by using lines in the book (after we read it) and make changes to put errors in the sentences and the students would need to correct it. I might even have the students pick there favorite author and start writing letters to them.