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A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver

A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver

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A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver

peringkat:
4/5 (18 peringkat)
Panjangnya:
186 halaman
2 jam
Dirilis:
Jun 28, 2011
ISBN:
9781439132159
Format:
Buku

Deskripsi

Eleanor of Acquitaine has been waiting in Heaven for a long time to be reunited with her second husband, Henry II of England. Finally, the day has come when Henry will be judged for admission--and while Eleanor waits, three people close to her during various times of her life join her, helping to distract her and providing a rich portrait of a remarkable woman in history.
Dirilis:
Jun 28, 2011
ISBN:
9781439132159
Format:
Buku

Tentang penulis

E.L. Konigsburg is the only author to have won the Newbery Medal and a Newbery Honor in the same year. In 1968, From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler won the Newbery Medal and Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth, William McKinley, and Me, Elizabeth was named a Newbery Honor Book. Almost thirty years later she won the Newbery Medal once again for The View from Saturday. Among her other acclaimed books are Silent to the Bone, The Outcasts of 19 Schuyler Place, and The Mysterious Edge of the Heroic World.


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Pendapat orang tentang A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver

4.2
18 peringkat / 11 Ulasan
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  • (3/5)
    Eleanor of Aquitaine, wife of two kings and mother of two more, is waiting to see if her second husband, Henry II of England, will be allowed into heaven. Although this book gave me a much clearer insight into the characters of the time, I did feel that it was a bit simplistic. I’d like to read a more thorough biography of Eleanor. [Feb. 2010]
  • (2/5)
    So hello I’m gonna write a review on what I dislike and like about “A proud Taste of Scarlet and Miniver”. So first off it is super confusing because of the changing points of view even though on the top it says who is talking like William or Abbot sugar but still. Sometimes I didn’t pay attention to the top of the page and it would be so confusing it was a very distracting book in my opinion. The good thing about it is that it has a lot of character and it is creative but not an understandable book to read. Thank you
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Another childhood favorite. I remember checking this book out of my local branch library multiple times. Eleanor of Aquitaine waits in Heaven to see if her much beloved -- and much warred with -- husband Henry will be released from Purgatory. While she waits, she reflects on her life.

    My first look at European history came with this book. Although I've read more about Eleanor and Henry since then (and who could forget Lion in Winter?), and this version is tailored for a young audience, I still recall this version of her. It contains the conflict, the difficulties, and the wonders of that period in history, and of this very unique woman.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    As vivacious Eleanor of Aquitaine, a real-life queen of 12th-century England and France, awaits the arrival of her husband Henry into Heaven, she and three acquaintances recall her remarkable life on earth. After a brief but slowly-paced beginning that sets up the Heaven framework for the story, each section of Eleanor's life gallops along as it's recalled by one of her friends in a Chaucer-esque tale. Historical fact and believable fiction blend as Eleanor weds and divorces Louis of France, and then weds Henry of England, creating rebellions, setting standards of culture, and proving that women can rule kingdoms along the way. Per the end matter, all characters in the story were real people. Occasional black and white drawings accompanied by calligraphy add to the medieval feel. The royal courts were known for foul play and much dalliance, but Konigsburg adeptly navigates the scandal while keeping the intrigue. As a sort of "literary biography," this would be an excellent short novel to pair with a more formal biography for a project aligned to Common Core standards. Recommended for grades 4-8.
  • (4/5)
    Really enjoyed this look at the lives of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine in the 12th and 13th centuries. I had read about them in high school history class, but Konigsburg really brought them to life. I am looking forward to reading more of her historical fiction.
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    What if people really went to heaven when they die -- and we could snoop in on their conversation? Beautiful drawings and pleasant rendition of Eleanor's life history.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver tells the story of Eleanor of Aquitaine, that striking queen who married two kings, ruled two countries, gave birth to three kings, was imprisoned by her husband for sixteen years, and who, in this tale, is now in Heaven recounting the events of her life to pass the time. E. L. Konigsburg has long been celebrated as one of the more versatile and creative authors in young adult fiction, and this story is no exception to her skill. In her hands Eleanor emerges as an extravagant, intelligent, strong young woman, full of personality and passon, who had no hesitation about what she wanted and how to get it. Eleanor tells some of the story, but much is also told by her mother-in-law Matilda, the Abbot Suger, and William the Marshall. I remember studying Chrétien de Troyes in college; well, Eleanor was his patroness. Everything is connected eventually for those of us who study English! Chrétien de Troyes wrote poems and romances based on Arthurian legends, and "cleaned up" the stories to make the knights bolder, the ladies more beautiful, the deeds more heroic. All of this was connected with Eleanor's famous "Court of Love," which gave shape and momentum to the chivalric tradition. Although historically there is some question as to the real weight and importance of the Court of Love, Konigsburg clearly takes Eleanor's side, writing that she is the reason that men open doors for women to this very day. It's funny that what many modern feminists regard as degrading began as the philosophy (quite opposite that of the rest of the world at the time) that man was entirely the property of woman. Of course this is Eleanor's story written for young readers, and though certain inappropriate things can't be entirely ignored (like Henry's philandering, especially with Rosamund Clifford), Konigsburg glosses them as best she can. Nor can you get around the sixteen-year imprisonment... even for royalty, that's a rather unusual domestic arrangement. And sometimes life just wasn't pleasant back then; Eleanor's son Richard died of the infection from an arrow would in the shoulder, after his surgeons dug around unsuccessfully in his shoulder to remove the arrowhead. Ugh...Of course the story is a dreadful theology of Heaven and Hell, a caricature of Roman Catholic beliefs (everyone spends some time in Hell before being admitted "Up", and being "Up" translates to boredom for the feisty Eleanor). But, taking it as a fictional frame only, I like it. It gathers all the main players in Eleanor's life and allows them to tell their part of her story. All in all, this is an enjoyable introduction to one of history's most fascinating women. Recommended.
  • (5/5)
    I read this book as a kid and absolutely loved it -- and have been a fan of Eleanor of Acquitaine ever since. It's still my favorite portrayal of her, over Katharine Hepburn in The Lion in Winter and definitely over Alison Weir's new and disappointing "Captive Queen." The book's conceit is that Eleanor is in heaven, it's set in the present day (the book was published in 1973) and she's waiting to see if her husband Henry II of England will be allowed Up after centuries in purgatory. She reviews the events of her life with three others who lived parts of it with her -- Abbot Suger of France (she was queen of France before she divorced Louis and married Henry Plantagent -- who was 12 years younger), Henry's mother, the Empress Matilda, and William Marshal, a loyal English knight. It's a great way to convey the events of her life and a fantastic introduction to medieval European history for any kid with an interest in that sort of thing. And it turns out, as an adult, it's still a fun read.
  • (4/5)
    Eleanor of Aquitaine was a vivid, fascinating woman who lived and made a great deal of history. A Proud Taste for Scarlet and Miniver imagines her in Heaven, waiting impatiently for her second husband, Henry II, to arrive for his judgement and hopefully, admittance into Heaven.While she waits, she visits with three other associates from her life on earth: her mother-in-law Matilda, Archbishop Suger, and William Marshall. They takes turns telling the parts of her life's story that each of them is most familiar with.It's a wonderful introduction to Eleanor and all the famous people from history that her life intersected with, and does a particularly nice job of showing her accomplishments: an introduction to the ideals of chivalry at her Court of Love, her commssioning poets and authors to "improve" the stories of King Arthur, and her and Henry II's efforts to bring about the Rule of Law in England. I found it valuable for these things even as a mature reader. A young reader would find it a great story well told, without even having to be aware of how much they were learning.
  • (5/5)
    Oh, E.L. Konigsburg, how could I ever expect anything less than delightful perfection from you? I don't know how I missed this one growing up, considering From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler was a favorite in elementary school.I love historical fiction, but I sometimes struggle to find books in the genre that I know kids will truly enjoy. Proud Taste is one of those books. Konigsburg sets up a clever premise in which impatient Eleanor is waiting in heaven for her husband, Henry II, to move 'up'. While waiting, the readers are told the story of Eleanor's life by three people who knew Eleanor while she was queen: Henry's mother, Abbot Suger (my favorite), and William the Marshal. Each person takes turns relating the life of Eleanor in such a way that the reader doesn't get bogged down while learning about Middle Ages France and England, which is indeed exactly what is going on! Rather than focusing on dates and events, the story is told with a focus on Eleanor's personality, which is quite different than that of most other women of the 12th century. Included in the book are ink drawings separating each of the narratives, along with a map.
  • (5/5)
    For the most part, I've enjoyed reading my kid's history books, be they factual or historical fiction. It's really become quite a pleasant routine. But there's still room for surprises, as I found out reading this one. A Proud Taste is a biography of Eleanor of Aquitaine, who is known for being the wife of King Henry II of England and mother to King Richard the Lion-heart. (At least I'm assuming that's her claim to fame--I really hadn't taken note of her before reading this book.) She's an interesting lady, but even more interesting is how Konigsburg tells her tale. Eleanor's life is told in flashback. The book starts out in heaven, or at least heaven according to Roman Catholic theology. Eleanor is waiting for the imminent release of King Henry from Purgatory. She's waiting with three friends, and to bide the time, they discuss her life. It's an enjoyable dramatization, one I'd advise checking out for the story as much as the historical information.--J.