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Lester's Dreadful Sweaters

Lester's Dreadful Sweaters

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Lester's Dreadful Sweaters

peringkat:
4/5 (59 peringkat)
Panjangnya:
32 pages
15 minutes
Dirilis:
Jun 6, 2013
ISBN:
9781554539994
Format:
Buku

Deskripsi

A fastidious fellow, Lester likes everything just so. So when Cousin Clara moves in and knits him truly dreadful sweaters as fast as he can surreptitiously dispose of them, Lester must think of a way to get rid of them for good — or be doomed to look like a clown forever.
Dirilis:
Jun 6, 2013
ISBN:
9781554539994
Format:
Buku

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Lester's Dreadful Sweaters - K. G. Campbell

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Pendapat orang tentang Lester's Dreadful Sweaters

4.0
59 peringkat / 9 Ulasan
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  • (4/5)
    I love the premise of this story and found it hilarious, tinged with a bit of sadness until the very happy and funny ending. The illustrations definitely fit the story and were also properly amusing, but except for the adorable dog, I can’t say I found them aesthetically pleasing. The dog and its expressiveness is great though. I really loved Lester; he’s a wonderfully unique character. I like the story’s message of a person finding a good fit for themselves and its potential for discussing how to react to unwanted but well-meaning gifts, but mostly it’s just silly and fun. Thanks to Goodreads friend Melody for alerting me to this book.
  • (4/5)
    Lester’s cousin Clara (who may not be related to him) makes him plenty of hideous sweaters that clash with his precise style of dress, and Lester has to learn how to accept these unwanted gifts instead of destroying them as he is wont to do. The events in the narrative are unexpected and yet they make sense for these quirky characters. The ending is similarly surprising yet satisfying. This book may not be enjoyed by everyone, but it will hit the spot for readers with a specific sense of humor.Like the humor and eccentricity of the story, the illustrations can be hit or miss. They may not be the most aesthetically pleasing, but they fit the text (except for the likeness of Clara, which does not match her description). The characters are incredibly individualized and expressive. The colors are soft, but the “dreadful sweaters” are vibrantly rendered.Though the book may not have universal appeal, its lesson is more main-stream. Children like Lester learn to appreciate all gifts. Lester’s Dreadful Sweaters may be too sophisticated or oddball to initially teach the lesson, but it could be a good reinforcement for more sophisticated, upper elementary readers.
  • (4/5)
    A very fun story that both kids and adults will find entertaining. Lester's Aunt Clara (who might not actually be related to anyone) has to come live with the family after her house is eaten by a crocodile, and she keeps knitting him horrible sweaters that he keeps destroying in ever more creative ways.
  • (4/5)
    When Cousin Clara comes to stay with his family after her cottage is eaten by a crocodile, Lester, a young boy who likes things just so, is subjected to a series of hand-knitted monstrosities, otherwise known as sweaters. From the less-than-pleasant to the truly ghastly, Cousin Clara's gifts must be accepted with good grace, although mysterious "accidents" seem to keep destroying them. Unfortunately, Lester's kind cousin knits as fast as he can come up with creative disposal ideas. Then a meeting with a group of clowns, who all love Lester's dreadful sweater, provides Cousin Clara with a new job and home, and Lester with a much-needed reprieve.Author/illustrator K.G. Campbell, who subsequently published such titles as The Mermaid and the Shoe and Dylan the Villain, as well as illustrating Kate DiCamillo's Newbery Medal-winning novel, Flora and Ulysses, made his debut with Lester's Dreadful Sweaters. From the front cover to the final page, I found his sense of humor here, whether textual or visual, absolutely hysterical. I loved his use of language, derived a great deal of amusement from the back-and-forth exchanges of Lester and Cousin Clara - "I have curiously bad luck with sweaters," Lester explained. "Luckily," said Cousin Clara, "I'm a curiously speedy knitter" - and found the artwork, done in pencil crayon, immensely droll. Recommended to anyone who enjoys picture-books with a somewhat quirky sense of humor!
  • (4/5)
    In this book Lester is a boy who is very particular about things especially with the way he appears to others. He gets a surprise when his aunt who they don't even know if she is related to them comes to stay at his house. She is a lady that loves to knit. So everyday while she is there she knits him some pretty wild and unusual sweaters.
  • (5/5)
    This book is about a kid who's cousin enjoys kitting sweaters. Lester tries to embrace the sweater but just can't find himself to like it. This can be relatable to children who are expected to wear clothes they may not like.
  • (4/5)
    Droll, funny, relatable story about the hideous, unwanted gifts kids receive and the good manners that compel them to accept them gracuiously.
  • (4/5)
    Lester’s Dreadful Sweaters is a must have for any elementary classroom. K.G. Campbell tells the story of a boy who likes order in his life when unexpectedly a whacky aunt moves in to shake up his world. From the title you can guess what her pastime is and when Lester is expected to wear these dreadful sweaters to school life gets humorously grim. This book is chalked full of instructional possibilities for reading, writing and social skills. Campbell’s uses of word choice and clever alliterations as well as adorable illustrations make the book a real page turner; students from grades k – 5 will find this book enchanting.
  • (3/5)
    Lester is very particular about his appearance – his socks must be even and his hair combed just so – but when Cousin Clara comes to stay and knits him horrendous sweater after horrendous sweater, Lester becomes the laughingstock of his class. This picture book takes full advantage of its humorous premise, and the sweaters depicted in the illustrations are truly, laugh-out-loud dreadful. An excellent use of white space, muted backgrounds and dramatic viewpoints help to capture the humor. Readers will gleefully turn pages to see just how dreadful Lester’s next sweater will be and what means he will devise to destroy it. Indeed, the illustrations carry such a punch that the text sometimes dampers the humor by trying to describe what the illustrations more effectively show. Otherwise, the text is careful crafted with copious amounts of alliteration and subtle humor. Young readers may have trouble catching all the subtleties, such as Lester’s “curiously bad luck with sweaters” not being bad luck at all, but fortunately, one does not have to get all of these subtleties to appreciate the story. Recommended for readers ages 4 to 8, particularly readers with a sophisticated sense of humor.