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Virginia Wolf

Virginia Wolf

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Virginia Wolf

peringkat:
4.5/5 (52 peringkat)
Panjangnya:
34 pages
4 minutes
Dirilis:
Dec 3, 2013
ISBN:
9781771380935
Format:
Buku

Deskripsi

When Virginia wakes up feeling "wolfish," her sister, Vanessa, tries to cheer her up. After treats, funny faces and other efforts fail, Vanessa begins to paint a glorious mural depicting the world of the sisters' imagination. Will it help lift Virginia from her doldrums?
Dirilis:
Dec 3, 2013
ISBN:
9781771380935
Format:
Buku

Tentang penulis

Kyo Maclear is a novelist, essayist, and children’s author. She was born in London, England, and moved to Toronto at the age of four. Her writing has appeared in The Millions, The Volta, The Guardian, and The Globe and Mail, among other publications. Kyo lives in Toronto where she shares a home with two sons, two cats, and a musician. For more information, please visit KyoMaclear.com or KyoMaclearKids.com.


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Pendapat orang tentang Virginia Wolf

4.3
52 peringkat / 10 Ulasan
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  • (5/5)
    I love how this book presents what can be a dark topic to children in a way that is easy for them to process. It's about sisterhood and what a lot of love and imagination can do to help someone who is feeling "wolfish". My absolute favorite thing about the book was the illustrations. They are PERFECT! They are so beautiful. They add to the story in such a great way. I am going to buy this book so I have it forever!
  • (4/5)
    Nice illustrations!
  • (5/5)
    Virginia Wolf is one of the best books I've read. The pictures are great and it is truly a sister bonding book to read to a class of anywhere from Kindergarten to third grade. The main character is Virginia Wolf and is written through the point of view of her sister. Her sister views Wolf as a wolf who does not talk to anyone and barely likes anything. At the end of the story, she finally gets Wolf to become content and plays outside in the garden with her he sister, hand-in-hand. I would recommend this book for anyone who has siblings, especially a sister who is the complete opposite of him/her.
  • (5/5)
    Vanessa's sister Virginia acts like a wolf. I have no idea if kids would like this, but as someone who admires/sorrows for Woolf, I think the extended metaphor really works. Poor woman.

    Ahwoooo!

    Library copy.
  • (4/5)
    "One day my sister Virginia woke up feeling wolfish," the young narrator of this creative picture-book exploration of childhood emotion begins, going on to describe her sister's terrible mood, and her own efforts to do something to cheer her up. Eventually, it is the narrator's beautiful painting that leads Virginia to a better state of mind...Apparently inspired by celebrated author Virginia Wolff and her painter-sister, Vanessa Bell, Kyo Maclear's narrative in Virginia Wolf offers a sensitive examination of the state of depression, as witnessed by a loved one. The mixed media illustrations by Isabelle Arsenault, who also collaborated with Maclear on Spork, make excellent use of black silhouettes and more colorful elements to capture the changing emotional register of the story. Vivid colors enter the picture through the narrator's painting, and reflect Virginia's slowly changing state of mind. Recommended to fans of Arsenault (in whose number I count myself), as well as to anyone looking for children's stories about depression.
  • (5/5)
    I love the description of a child Virginia's depression as feeling "wolfish". Seemed so right (or maybe i'm projecting.
  • (5/5)
     I loved this book. Not only could I relate to the grumpy sibling, but I wanted to know what would make Virginia happy again. The awesome thing about this book was the illustrations combined with the text. On some pages the text was huge and a sentence took up a whole page, when Virginia was speaking, whilst on others the text would only take up a small corner when Vanessa was speaking. The illustrations mirrored a book we read in class. The characters were all black when Virginia was unhappy, but when Virginia cheered up, you could see her colorful dress and bright bows. Also, it was almost like Vanessa was painting the pages herself. She got the idea to create “Bloomsbury” and once she got the idea, the pages started to have color. Another reason this book was so great, was the writing. Not just the words and the flow of the book, but the placement of the writing. Some words like racket and doldrums were underlined and capitalization differed when characters were speaking. Overall, I think the big message was to always try to make people happy, because there is always a way. Vanessa did not give up on Virginia, even though she was being terribly mean. In the end they both became happy exploring in the “perfect place”.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely adored Kyo Maclear's Virginia Wolf. Illustrated by the extremely talented Isabelle Arsenault, this is the story of sisters Virginia and Vanessa as battle Virginia's sadness and anger with imagination and colorful art.I love that this book has the potential to inspire and guide not only the grumpiest, most wolfish child, but also adults who've also fallen prey to their wolfish tendencies. No matter your age, Vanessa's determination and the beautiful illustrations within Virginia Wolf's pages has the power to inspire and slowly tame the wolf within.Key Words and Ideas: EmpathyLearning to deal with and handle emotionUsing art as an emotional outletImaginationCompassionSisters
  • (5/5)
    Virginia Wolf is the story of a girl whose sister Virginia wakes up feeling wolfish. Nothing can cheer her up and she does nothing but stay in bed. She only talks about Bloomsbury, a place where everything is perfect. Can a surprise from her sister shake her doldrums?I really enjoyed this book. The illustrations were amazing and creative. It also approached the topic of depression in children in a very subtle and respectful way. It was really touching. It's a great read aloud for any age kid. 2nd grade and up could read it independently. The complex topic with simpler language makes it a good choice for low readers in the upper grades.
  • (4/5)
    Children will obviously not understand the references to Vrginia Woolf's life in this story, but they will appreciate the story of one sister using her imagination to help another out of a "wolfish" mood.