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Singapore Houses

Singapore Houses

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Singapore Houses

peringkat:
4/5 (2 peringkat)
Panjangnya:
453 pages
2 hours
Dirilis:
Mar 13, 2012
ISBN:
9781462906031
Format:
Buku

Deskripsi

Singapore Houses features top architects and designers with ideas that are stylish, contemporary, and show twenty-first century savvy.

The houses in this book epitomize cutting-edge residential architecture in Singapore. they demonstrate a remarkable surge of design exploration in the city-state. Architects in Singapore are producing work with a level of refinement and sophistication that is comparable with the best in the world and one would be hard pressed to find a nation of similar size with such an abundance of accomplished young designers who have built independently.

The houses include recent designs by doyens of the profession such as Sonny Chan Sau Yan, Kerry Hill and Ernesto Bedmar in addition to the firmly established "next" generation including Mok Wei Wei, Chan Soo Khian, Siew Man Kok and Richard Hassell. For those looking for new architecture or interior design ideas, Singapore Houses will surely add a unique, fresh element to their homes and projects.
Dirilis:
Mar 13, 2012
ISBN:
9781462906031
Format:
Buku

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Singapore Houses - Robert Powell

SINGAPORE

HOUSES

ROBERT POWELL

photographs by ALBERT LIM KS

TUTTLE PUBLISHING

Tokyo • Rutland, Vermont • Singapore

Published by Tuttle Publishing, an imprint of Periplus Editions (HK) Ltd., with editorial offices at 364 Innovation Drive, North Clarendon, Vermont 05759, USA, and 61 Tai Seng Avenue, #02-12, Singapore 534167.

Text © 2009 Robert Powell

Photographs © 2009 Albert Lim Koon Seng

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without prior permission of the publisher.

ISBN: 978-1-4629-0603-1 (ebook)

Distributed by:

North America, Latin America & Europe

Tuttle Publishing

364 Innovation Drive, North Clarendon, VT 05759-9436, USA

Tel: 1 (802) 773-8930; Fax: 1 (802) 773-6993

info@tuttlepublishing.com

www.tuttlepublishing.com

Asia Pacific

Berkeley Books Pte Ltd

61 Tai Seng Avenue, #02-12, Singapore 534167

Tel: (65) 6280-1330; Fax: (65) 6280-6290

inquiries@periplus.com.sg

www.periplus.com

Japan

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Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141 0032

Tel: (81) 03 5437-0171; Fax: (81) 03 5437-0755

tuttle-sales@gol.com

Printed in Singapore

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TUTTLE PUBLISHING® is a registered trademark of Tuttle Publishing, a division of Periplus Editions (HK) Ltd.

cutting-edge

tropical architecture

in a global city

THE HOUSES IN THIS BOOK EPITOMISE CUTTING-EDGE RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURE IN SINGAPORE AT THE BEGINNING OF THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY AND DEMONSTRATE A REMARKABLE SURGE OF DESIGN EXPLORATION IN THE CITY-STATE.¹

Architects in Singapore are producing work with a level of refinement and sophistication that is comparable with the best in the world, and one would be hard pressed to find a nation of similar size with such an abundance of accomplished young designers who have built independently.

In the last two decades of the twentieth century, architectural debate in Singapore, as in many Asian countries that had formerly been colonized by European powers, revolved around the notions of Identity² and Critical Regionalism.³

Prominent Singapore participants in seminars that were convened in the 1980s and 1990s included Tay Kheng Soon and William Lim Siew Wai. Both wrote at length about the social, cultural and climatic imperatives of architecture.

Lim’s Contemporary Vernacular (1998),⁴ written in collaboration with Tan Hock Beng, extolled the merits of reinvigorating and reinterpreting the traditional vernacular architecture of the region. His design for the Reuter House (1990) was just such a contemporary interpretation. In contrast, the King Albert Park House (1994) by Tay Kheng Soon was designed in a modern tropical idiom that demonstrated what Tay identified in Modern Tropical Architecture (1997)⁵ as ‘a language of line, edge, mesh and shade’.

The discourse on the ‘global’ and the ‘local’ fuelled several publications, such as The Asian House (1993),⁶ The Tropical Asian House (1996)⁷ and The Urban Asian House (1998),⁸ which placed the production of architect-designed dwellings within a broad theoretical framework linked to issues throughout the so-called developing world.

Other publications followed in the next decade, including Houses for the 21st Century (2004),⁹ New Directions in Tropical Architecture (2005)¹⁰ and 25 Houses in Singapore and Malaysia (2006),¹¹ as publishers in the Antipodes belatedly turned their gaze on developments in Asia.¹² In 2008, David Robson’s magnificent volume, Beyond Bawa,¹³ also drew attention to the work of a group of Singapore architects bewitched by the magical houses designed by the Sri Lankan master architect Geoffrey Bawa.

Another Singapore architect, Tang Guan Bee, wrote little, but through his built work, such as The Mountbatten House (1988) and later the Windsor Park House (1997), demonstrated a spirit of invention and audacity that captivated the imagination of many young architects entering the profession. The diverse approaches to domestic architecture of Tay, Lim and Tang laid the foundations for the explosion of design ideas in Singapore in the first years of the new millennium. Significantly, four of the architects featured in this book worked at some time or other with TANGGUANBEE Architects, while five began their careers with William Lim Associates and three with Tay’s practice, Akitek Tenggara.

A HOUSE IN THE HUMID TROPICS

‘SPACE. . . IS NOT REALLY ABSTRACT. SPACE IS SOMETHING WE CAN MODERATE AS ARCHITECTS TO SATISFY A WHOLE RANGE OF FUNCTIONS, INCLUDING VISUAL, SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL REQUIREMENTS. NOBODY EXCEPT THE ARCHITECT CAN DO THIS. . . IT IS THE MOST SIGNIFICANT ROLE OF THE ARCHITECT.’ Tang Guan Bee¹⁴

For an architect, the design of a bespoke family dwelling is a demanding yet fascinating commission. A designer rarely has such a close relationship with the end user. The most successful houses arise out of a strong empathy between the client and designer. This consonance is of critical importance because a house is ultimately ‘a social portrait of its owner’.

Single-family houses frequently acquire a hold on the imagination of generations of architects and are transmitted around the world. Think, for example, of the Villa Savoye by Le Corbusier (1928–9) or Gerrit Rietveld’s Schroeder House in Utrecht (1923–4). In a similar manner, Jimmy Lim’s Aga Khan Award-winning Salinger House at Bangi, Malaysia (1993), Ernesto Bedmar’s Eu House in Singapore (1993) and Geoffrey Bawa’s Cinnamon Hill House at Lunuganga, Sri Lanka (1993) fired the imagination of many young architects in Southeast Asia in the 1990s.

In 1996, in The Tropical Asian House, I summarized the attributes of a dwelling in the humid tropics. The first three criteria were articulated in a discussion with Bawa¹⁵ while dining on the terrace of his home at Lunuganga. He maintained that a house in the tropics is about living in close proximity to the natural world, and therefore no substantial trees should be destroyed on the site. He also asserted that a house in the tropics should be designed with the minimal use of glass, while other attributes include the use of gardens and non-reflective surfaces to reduce radiated heat, wide overhanging eaves to provide shade, in-between spaces in the form of verandahs, terraces and shaded balconies, tall rooms to create thermal air mass and provide thermal insulation, permeable walls facing prevailing winds to give natural ventilation, plans that are one room deep with openings on opposite sides capable of being adjusted to promote natural ventilation by the ‘venturi’ effect, and the omission of gutters. Bawa’s houses and resorts, published in a monograph of his work, Geoffrey Bawa, edited by Brian Brace-Taylor (1986),¹⁶ influenced a generation of Singapore architects educated in the late 1980s and 1990s.¹⁷

These criteria are still relevant in the densely populated island although the urban house cannot be so pure. To this list must be added another imperative, namely, duality between the public side of a house and the private side. This is linked to the perception of security with the public side being ‘closed’ and the private side ‘open’.

The challenge facing architects even in the relatively crime-free city of Singapore is to design houses that permit their clients to live a relaxed, open lifestyle, with verandahs, terraces and courtyard spaces, while simultaneously solving issues of security. Living in a conurbation necessitates a variety of responses to the perceived threat of intruders, including perimeter walls, fences and electronic surveillance devices. A house in the city invariably includes some means of isolating and securing the family sleeping quarters at night.

The houses shown here embody a hierarchy of privacy with a public façade that seeks not to attract undue attention or to make an extravagant display of wealth, and interior spaces that embrace and shelter their occupants while opening out to courtyards and terraces. They provide a haven of calm and a ‘refuge’ from the frantic pace of life in the city-state and seek to modify the effects of air pollution, noise and increasingly high temperatures that inevitably necessitate air conditioning in some parts of the house.

THE HOUSES IN THIS BOOK

‘IT IS VERY DIFFICULT TO DESIGN A HOUSE–TO TRY TO PSYCHOANALYSE YOUR CLIENT, TO DETERMINE BEHIND THE FAÇADE WE ALL ERECT TO THE WORLD WHO THE CLIENT REALLY IS. . . BUT IT IS ESSENTIAL IF THE HOUSE IS TO FIT THE PERSONALITY.’ Geoffrey Bawa¹⁸

The houses in this book were all constructed in the first decade of the twenty-first century and vividly illustrate emerging ideas on living in the city-state. They are the work of three generations of architects.

Two of the houses are designed by respected doyens of the profession in Singapore, namely, Sonny Chan Sau Yan and Kerry Hill. Both began their architectural careers in the 1960s and have impressive portfolios of work carried out internationally over a forty-year period. In the process, they have garnered numerous awards.

But the majority of the dwellings, eighteen in all, are designed by what I defined, in October 1999, as the ‘Next Generation’.¹⁹ The architects who fall in this category include Ernesto Bedmar, Chan Soo Khian, Ko Shiou Hee, Lim Cheng Kooi, Mok Wei Wei, Siew Man Kok, Kevin Tan, Tan Kok Hiang, René Tan, Teh Joo Heng, Toh Yiu Kwong, WOHA (Wong Mun Summ and Richard Hassell) and Yip Yuen Hong. I had the privilege of teaching some of this cohort, and subsequently I have tracked their progress over two decades.

This generation, to quote Philip Goad, ‘has moved beyond the attractive formal signs of so-called regional architecture, to a re-thinking of the fundamental issues of space, material practice, tropicality, sustainability, urbanity and place–in essence, a return to Ignasi de Sola Morale’s ground zero for architecture, a sort of phenomenological and existential base for the production of

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