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Literature-based Lesson Title: Me on the Map

Teachers: Amanda Allen Subject Area: Geography Grade Level: 1st Grade Date: 3/16/12 Purpose/Goal: The purpose of this activity is for students to learn the dimensional progression of geographical locations. For example, by the end of this lesson they should know that counties are larger than cities and that each county is made up of several cities. Overview: After listening to a book about different geographical locations, students will create their own representation of where they live (their house/school, the city, the county, the state, the country, the continent, and the planet). Standards First Grade Geography o Benchmark 1: Geographic Tools and Location- The student uses maps, graphic representations, tools, and technologies to locate, use, and present information about people, places, and environments. Indicator 1: describes the purposes of maps and globes Indicator 3: makes a map to represent some location important to them. Second Grade Geography o Benchmark 1: Geographic Tools and Location- The student uses maps, graphic representations, tools, and technologies to locate, use, and present information about people, places, and environments. Indicator 1: makes and uses maps to represent and locate familiar places within cities and Kansas.

Themes: (III) People, Place, and Environment; (IV) Individual Development and Identity, (IX) Global Connections Objectives

Students will be able to correctly identify the order of the increasingly specific location of where they live (planet>continent>country>state>county>city>street). Students will be able to determine what each geographical element is a compilation of (ex: counties are made up of several cities, states of several counties, etc) Students will be able to discuss the importance of using maps to represent each of these places.

Resources/ Materials

Me on the Map by Joan Sweeney, construction paper, crayons, pencils, computer, projector, Google Earth, glue, templates

Procedures Introduction

Begin by asking the students if any of them know what their address is. Call on a few students to share. Then ask the students if they can give any more information about where they live (city, county, state, country, etc.). Learning Sequence 1. Start this lesson by reading Me on the Map aloud to the whole class. 2. Ask the students to share something they learned about where their home/school is with their partner. Then discuss as a whole class. 3. Open Google Earth and search the address of the school. Then search the city the school is located in. Next, search the county and so on until you see the entire Earth. a. You could also do this step in the reverse order, from biggest to smallest, since the program starts off showing the whole Earth. 4. After the students have seen this representation, explain to them that they are going to create their own map of where they live. Show students an example and write the geographical terms they need to include on the board. 5. Pass out the materials and let students get started labeling the different sized circles for what they represent. 6. Then students will start illustrating each of the circles. Let them trace or use the templates for the country, continent, and planet illustrations if they want. Closure


Assessment

When students have finished their maps, ask if anyone wants to share their finished product with the class. Review with the students the different size of each term through discussion.

After everyone who wants to has shared, have students turn in the maps they created.

Student participation in class discussion Teacher observation Completed maps of where they live Adaptations Students with physical disabilities will be able to use photos of each of the

geographical terms if their fine motor skills are compromised. They can also receive help from a classmate if needed.

For more advanced students, have them create a map representing another city that they might not have as much familiarity with. They would then need to do some research to figure out what each of the elements is for that city. Have maps available for reference for students who may struggle with this activity.