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Lesson 7

Subject: Mathematics Course/Grade: Grade 5 Unit 5: Fraction Sense and Manipulation, Lesson 7: Changing Improper Fractions to Mixed Numbers Instructional/Content Objective: Students will work as a class to explore the physical connection between improper fractions and mixes numbers, develop a division rule for conversion, and independently convert 8 out of 10 given improper fractions to mixed numbers. Curriculum Framework Standards: Through exploration and computation students will be able to (5.NF.3) interpret a fraction as division of the numerator by the denominator (a/b = a b). Solve word problems involving division of whole numbers leading to answers in the form of fractions or mixed numbers, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. Lesson Procedure I. Preparation Phase: Build background knowledge 1. Students will open their notebooks, write the days objective and answer the Math Message and MCAS question of the day. 2. Introduce the days objective by having two students read it directly from the board and two students express the objective in their own words. 3. Point out the guiding questions and ask students which question the objective addresses. Vocabulary 4. Call the class experts for improper fraction and mixed number to the board. Display their vocabulary boxes, ask the students to explain the definition of each word, and ask their prepared questions to the class. 5. Ask if the students have any questions for the expert. The students will be in the expert chairs for the class and will be available during the whole lesson if any students have questions or need help. 6. The two experts will lead the class to play the Improper Fraction Identification game on the Smartboard. Focus student attention on the topic 7. Display the slide with pictures of five half circles and ask a student to choose a real life object the circles can represent. 8. Challenge students to explain the value in terms of an improper fraction and a mixed number. Ask students to share strategies they used to find each representation. 9. Have one student go to the board to show how pieces can be moved together to create wholes. II. Assistance and Associations Phase Making Connections 1. Complete the Smartboard lesson as a whole class. When each slide is initially displayed, ask a student to identify a real life scenario where this improper fraction could be represented with the picture. Refer to the shapes as that object or measurement for the remainder of the slide. 2. Students work in leveled groups to complete the explorations. Every member of the group will complete the conversion problems using blocks.

Lesson 7

3. Ask students to discuss with their group a possible mathematical or computational rule that can be used to change improper fractions to mixed numbers without using blocks or pictures. 4. Discuss findings as a whole class. Monitoring their own understanding 5. Distribute conversion practice problems and individual whiteboards, markers, and erasers. 6. Ask students to look at the first problem and choose a real life scenario they will apply to the problem. 7. Ask them to use their boards to draw the picture of the improper fraction in pictures. 8. Students will complete the division computation on the paper and prove the answer using the pictures on the whiteboards. 9. Students will complete the other practice problems following the same procedure: scenario, picture, division computation, and prove it. Asking Questions 10. During the independent practice gather a small group of students identified during the lesson or small-group exploration. Designate two students who show the strongest understanding to be the experts that other students can approach with specific questions (quality question expectations were established at the beginning of the school year). III. Reflection and Readiness for Application: Think, talk and/or write about their learning 1. Bring students together on the rug and discuss strengths and struggles they experienced during the practice activity. Ask other students to clarify or answer questions about the rules or steps. Reprocess the information learned 2. Students will return to their desks and complete and choose where they stand on the line between mixed numbers and improper fractions. Make a line down the center of the classroom and have students decide which side they will stand on and write their answer to the following question to defend their choice. Why do we need to use both improper fractions and mixed numbers? Is one more useful than the other? Why or why not? Check for understanding 3. Students will hand in their practice problems, teacher will informally assess students during lesson, exploration, and practice, and notebooks will be checked for math message and final question.