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Somethings Fishy in Here!

By: Rachel Pollock Period: 3 Group Members: Kira Fagan and Josh Torres

Pre-Lab
1. Sketch of fish with labeled anatomy (back page) 2. When observing the Siamese fighting fish before exposing it to any external stimuli, I noticed many behavioral aspects of the fish, Bob. The position of his fins and gill covers were submissive. They did not stick up; they were just positioned downward and more relaxed-looking. His fins and gill covers were blue except for his pelvic fins which were red. Bob was swimming around the tank in the middle in a calm, slow fashion. He only gulped for air every so often but not a lot. I saw no sign of a nest in the tank as there were not any bubbles at the top level of the water. Note that the temperature of the water would be fairly warm because the surrounding environment of the fish tank was extremely warm. 3. Our presence seemed to affect Bob extremely. When my partners and I placed our finger on the tank near where he was located, he swam rapidly to the opposite side in panic. He was very submissive and never seemed aggressive when our hands were close to the tank. 4. To our surprise, when we placed the mirror in Bobs tank, he turned extremely aggressive. Since he was very submissive by our presence, I predicted that he would be very submissive to a mirror image of himself. When Bob saw the image of himself in the mirror, his gill covers and fins spiked up in an aggressive fashion. We also noticed that his fins and gill covers started to turn more red in color as he became more aggressive. There were no submissive behaviors shown by Bob at any point while the mirror was in the water. He began to attempt biting the image of himself and tried to tail fight it the longer the mirror was in the tank.

Experiment
1. Problem/Study Question: Does size and color of a fish puppet affect the aggressiveness of the Siamese fighting fish? 2. Hypothesis: If the fish puppet is bigger in size and brighter in color, then the Siamese fighting fish will be more aggressive because the combination of the bright color and larger size will excite the fish on top of the larger threat of the presence of a bigger competitor. 3. Materials: paper puppet fish, packaging tape, popsicle stick, scissors, colored pencils, Siamese fight fish, water, tank, timer 4. Procedure: 1. Gather materials 2. Color one small and one big paper fish puppet with a bright color 3. Color one small and one big paper fish puppet with a dark color 4. Cut out each of the four paper fish puppets 5. Wrap each of the four paper fish puppets in packaging tape by placing one piece on either side of the puppet 6. Put a popsicle stick between the two pieces of tape around the paper fish puppet 7. Cut the excess packaging tape around the fish puppet down so it fits the general shape of the original cut out paper fish puppet 8. Record the Siamese fighting fishs behaviors for 1 minute before placing the fish puppet in to compare to the results of the reaction to each of the fish puppets 9. Place a fish puppet in the tank for 1 minute (try not to move the fish puppet around much as it could affect the experiment results 10. Record and explain the fishs behaviors and reactions 11. Also record on a data table chart the number of times the Siamese fighting fish tries to attack the fish puppet in any way 12. Let the Siamese fighting fish rest for about five minutes in between each of the fish puppet experiments 13. Repeat from step numbers 9-12 until all four of the paper fish puppets have been tested on the Siamese fighting fish

5. Collected and Analyzed Data: Type of Fish Puppet 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. None Bright and small Dark and small Bright and large Dark and large

Number of attacks in any way from the Siamese fighting fish 0 0 0 0 0

1. Before the experiment involving the fish puppets was conducted, Bob, the Siamese fighting fish seemed generally calm and submissive as usual while not being disturbed. He did not seem agitated and was calmly swimming around the tank 2. When the bright, small fish puppet was placed in the tank, Bob seemed very afraid of it and acted extremely submissive. He tried to avoid it by forcing himself into the corner and stopped swimming around. No aggression was shown. 3. When the dark, small fish puppet was placed in the tank, Bob also seemed very afraid of it like how he was with the bright, small fish puppet. He again forced himself into the corner and ceased swimming, trying to avoid the fish puppet. Similar to how he acted with the bright, small fish puppet, Bob continued to show great submissiveness. No aggression was shown. 4. When the bright, large fish puppet was placed in the tank, Bob acted a little differently to how he did with the two small fish puppets. He was still scared but a little flustered this time. He swam around rapidly and in a panicky way. His gills only flared for a few seconds, but he went back to acting a more flustered version of submissive compared to the small fish puppet results very quickly. The gill flaring for the short period of time was the only sign of aggressiveness shown. 5. When the dark, larger fish puppet was placed in the tank, Bob acted extremely similar to how he did with the bright, large fish puppet. He was flustered and swam around rapidly and panicky similar to how he

did with the bright, large fish puppet. He again only flared his gills for a few seconds before going back to his flustered submissiveness. The gill flaring for the short period of time was the only sign of aggressiveness shown. 6. Reflection on Findings/Conclusions Drawn: If the fish puppet is bigger in size and brighter in color, then the Siamese fighting fish will be more aggressive because the combination of the bright color and larger size will excite the fish on top of the larger threat of the presence of a bigger competitor. After conducting this experiment, I have come to the conclusion that my hypothesis is partially wrong based on the data collected and observations I made. As you can see from the data table, the Siamese fighting fish, Bob, made no aggressive attacks on the fish puppet in any way. The one thing I did noticed in my observations while running the experiment was that Bob did act a little more aggressive and differently around the larger fish puppets. The part of my hypothesis where I said the larger fish puppets would make the Siamese fighting fish more aggressive was right, but the part of my hypothesis where I said brighter colors would make the Siamese fighting fish more aggressive was wrong. As you can see by the results, the brighter or darker colors of the fish puppets had no effect on the aggressiveness on the Siamese fighting fish. The experiment did not turn out how I expected. I thought that Bob would make some attacks on the fish puppets based on how he reacted and attacked the mirror image of himself. If I could do this experiment again, I would try to make the fish puppets more realistic looking since Bob didnt attack those fish but attacked a mirror fish that looked exactly like himself. A possible variable of the experiment that could have affected the data results was the order of the fish puppets that Bob was exposed to. He could have possessed different feelings about the fish puppets as he developed a learning curve as what would happen each time when they were placed in the tank. Overall, I believe the experiment went well even though the results were not what I was hoping.