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Pewaukee Public Schools Pewaukee, WI Privileged and Confidential Information Section I: Identifying Data Name of Student: Jacob White

Address: 267 Prospect Ave., Pewaukee, WI Phone: (289) 867 5309 Date of Birth: 10/02/2000 Grade: 6 Parents Names: John/Rachel

School: Horizon Elementary Teacher: Mrs. Smith Referred by: Child Study Team Date of Testing: November 20, 2012 Date of Report: December 4, 2012 Chronological Age: 12-2 Examiner: Ms. Lynsey DeWitt

Section II: Reason for Referral Jacob was a volunteer subject recruited for a case study report assignment.

Section III: Background History A. Family History Jacob lives at home with his father, mother, and two younger sisters. Jacobs sister Abby is 8 years old, and Sarah is 6 years old. Mr. White is currently 38, and Mrs. White is 40 years old. Both Mr. and Mrs. White have a Bachelors Degree in Biology from University of WisconsinMadison. Mr. White is currently working as a pediatrician at Willmington Medical Clinic. Mrs. White is currently working as an ultrasound technician at Pewaukee Memorial Hospital. B. Developmental History According to Mrs. White, Jacob was diagnosed with anorexia in the fifth grade. He was provided with out-patient treatment for eight months. He still actively goes to therapy and has his eating disorder under control, according to the parents. C. Academic History Mrs. White indicated that Jacob has always done poorly in math and language arts. Jacobs fifthgrade teacher reported that he had great difficulty in the area of reading, writing, algebra, and geometry. Jacobs reading and math scores on the Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) test were well below the norm (20th percentile) when he took it a year ago in fifth grade. D. Social History Mrs. Jones, Jacobs fifth-grade teacher, indicated that Jacob got along well with all of the children in his class. Jacob doesnt enjoy speaking in front of the classroom on his own, but he greatly enjoys working in groups and presenting group projects. Jacob enjoys playing basketball and football and hanging out with friends. E. Parents Perception of the Problem Jacobs parents are not reporting problems in this evaluation.

Section IV: Behavioral Observations 1. Classroom observation Jacob fidgets in his seat quite often during class. He is always looking at his teacher, Mrs. Smith, when she is talking, and when he has something to say he quietly raises his hand. Jacob is not an active participant in class discussion. He pays attention during discussion, but it seems he would rather not share his ideas aloud to the class. 2. Behavior during testing Jacob was very relaxed during testing. He answered all the test questions in a calm, confident manner. Jacob was looking at the clock in between tests, but he didnt rush to answer questions or ask when the tests would be over. After testing, Jacob seemed relieved to be finished.

Section V: Tests and Procedures Administered 1. Conners Teacher Rating ScaleRevised (L) (CTRSR:L) 2. Test of Written Spelling4th Edition (TWS-4) 3. Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ-III) Subtest 2: Visual-Auditory Learning 4. Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of AchievementNormative Update (WJ-III/NU) Subtest 1: Letter-Word Identification Subtest 9: Passage Comprehension 5. Key Math Diagnostic Arithmetic TestsRevised/Normative Update (Key Math-R/NU) Subtest 3: Geometry Subtest 8: Mental Computation 6. Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills6th Edition (DIBELS) 7. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children4th Edition (WISC-IV) Subtest 3: Digit Span

Section VI: Test Results Jacob was administered tests 2-7 above which resulted in the following scores: Test Test of Written Spelling4th Edition Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities Test 2: Visual-Auditory Learning Derived Score Standard Score: 115 National Percentile Rank: 84th Age Equivalent: 6-5 Well Below Average Grade Equivalent: 1.2 Range

Test Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of AchievementNormative Update Test 1: Letter-Word Identification Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of AchievementNormative Update Test 9: Passage Comprehension Key Math Diagnostic Arithmetic TestsRevised/Normative Update Test 3: Geometry Key Math Diagnostic Arithmetic TestsRevised/Normative Update Test 8: Mental Computation Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills6th Edition

Derived Score Age Equivalent: 9-10

Range

Well Below Average Grade Equivalent: 4.5

Age Equivalent: 8-7 Well Below Average Grade Equivalent: 3.2

Standard Score: 7

Below Average

Standard Score: 7

Below Average

Words Correct per Minute (WCPM): 140 National Percentile Rank: 50th

Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children4th Edition Test 3: Digit Span

Standard Score: 8

Below Average

Jacobs teacher, Mrs. Smith, was administered the Conners Teacher Rating ScaleRevised (L) which resulted in the following scores: T-score (Mean= 50, SD= 10) 45 75 60 55 49 48 Range Average Markedly Atypical Slightly Atypical Average Average Average

A. Oppositional B. Cognitive Problems/Inattention C. Hyperactivity D. Anxious-Shy E. Perfectionism F. Social Problems

The TWS-4 measures written spelling proficiency. The test is made up of 50 words. For this test, Jacob listened to a word, heard it in a sentence, and then heard the word repeated again by itself. This is

conducted for every word that Jacob had to write. Jacob had to write the word on a paper that was given to him, and he was not given a time limit. Once he was done writing the word to the best of his knowledge, the assessor continued onto the next word. On this test Jacob earned a standard score of 115. As indicated by his percentile rank of 84, Jacob performed as well or better than 84 percent of all students when compared to the norms for his age. The Visual-Auditory Learning subtest of the WJ-III measures associative memory. For this subtest, Jacob was given symbols that represented specific words. After he was given what each symbol represented, he was shown a series of lines with the symbols in a row. Jacob was to look at the symbols and come up with a sentence based on the words that those symbols represented in each row. Each time he finished reading the rows of sentences, Jacob was shown more symbols and heard what each symbol represented. The process repeated itself with more symbols and new symbol sentences. On this subtest, Jacob performed in the Well Below Average range, earning him an age equivalence of 6-5 and a grade equivalence of 1.2. The Letter-Word Identification subtest of the WJ-III/NU measures the ability to identify letters and words in isolation. It also assesses the ability to use decoding to pronounce unfamiliar words. For this subtest, Jacob was shown words in isolation that he had to pronounce to the assessor. Because of his age, the test stated that Jacob start at a different item than the first item. On this subtest, Jacob performed in the Well Below Average range, earning him an age equivalence of 9-10 and a grade equivalence of 4.5. The Passage Comprehension subtest of the WJ-III/NU measures language comprehension and reading skills. The items that Jacob started at because of his age required that he read a short passage silently and identified a missing key word that made sense in the context of that passage. The first key words were pictures and the items became increasingly difficult by replacing the pictures with words. As the test went on, the difficulty increased through passage length, level of vocabulary, and complexity of syntactic and semantic cues. Jacob scored in the Well Below Average range, earning him an age equivalence of 8-7 and a grade equivalence of 3.2. The Geometry subtest of the Key Math-R/NU measures an individual's ability to analyze, describe, compare, and classify two- and three-dimensional shapes. It also assesses the knowledge of spatial relationships and reasoning, coordinates, symmetry, and geometric modeling. Jacob was shown a problem on an easel and the instructions were read to him. He was to answer the questions on the easel out loud to the assessor. On this subtest Jacob scored in the Below Average range, earning him a standard score of 7. The Mental Computation subtest of the Key Math-R/NU measures an individual's ability to mentally compute answers to math problems using addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division operations. This subtest contained problems involving one-, two-, and three digit numbers, as well as fractions, decimals, and percentages. For this subtest, Jacob was instructed to look at a math problem on an easel, compute the problem in his head, and say the answer to the problem out loud. On this subtest Jacob scored in the Below Average range, earning him a standard score of 7. The DIBELS test measures oral reading fluency, which is a combination of accuracy and speed. Jacob was given one minute to read a passage out loud. The assessor marked only the words he read incorrectly on a passage specifically for the assessor. On this test, Jacob received a percentile rank of 50 with 140 words correct per minute.

The Digit Span subtest of the WISC-IV measures attention, concentration, and immediate auditory memory. Jacob listened to a number sequence and had to repeat the sequence out loud. Next, Jacob listened to a number sequence and had to repeat the sequence out loud but in backwards order. The number sequences started with two-digit numbers, and increased in number up to no more than a nine-digit number sequences. On this subtest, Jacob scored in the Below Average range, earning himself a standard score of 8. The CTRSR:L assesses the severity of students behaviors and other concerns which are displayed through categories, each with an individual score. These categories include: oppositional, cognitive problems/inattention, anxious-shy, perfectionism, and social problems. The CTRSR:L required Mrs. Smith to respond to 59 questions with an answer of 0 (not true at all), 1 (just a little true), 2 (pretty much true), or 3 (very much true) as it pertained to Jacob. Jacob scored in the Average range for subtests A, D, E, F. He scored in the Slightly Atypical range for subtest C. Jacob scored in the Markedly Atypical range for subtest B.

Conclusions Jacob White is a 12-year-old sixth-grade boy who was administered several tests as a case study report volunteer. Results of these tests indicated that Jacob scored in the 84th percentile on the Test of Written Spelling. This means that Jacob does not need assistance with spelling other than from his classroom teacher. Jacob also scored in the 50th percentile in oral reading fluency. This means that Jacob is able to transform written text into spoken words. According to Mrs. Smiths results to the test she was administered, Jacob scored in the Average range for the following categories: oppositional, anxious-shy, perfectionism, social problems. This means that Jacob doesnt behave in an angry manner or oppose his teacher. He is not shy or a perfectionist and he gets along with his classmates, according to the test results. He scored in the Slightly Atypical range for hyperactivity, which means that Jacob may be a slightly more hyperactive than most boys his age, but not enough to cause a problem in the classroom. Results of these tests indicated that Jacob obtained Below Average scores in Geometry, Mental Computation, and Digit Span. Jacob seems to have difficulty in math with basic geometry skills and solving problems in his head. He also struggles with short-term memory and reciting back sequences correctly after hearing them. The results of the tests also indicated that Jacob scored in the Well Below Average range in Visual-Auditory Learning, Letter-Word Identification, and Passage Comprehension. With Jacobs Visual-Auditory Learning score, it seems that the test was not administered properly and is not a proper representation of Jacobs ability to associate symbols with words. It is recommended that this test be re-administered to Jacob in order to receive a more truthful score. The low score in LetterWord Identification means that Jacob has difficulty decoding words. Jacob also seems to have difficulty with understanding text and being able to explain missing key points in a text. Jacob scored in the Markedly Atypical range for cognitive problems/inattention, according to the test Mrs. Smith was administered. This means that Jacob struggles with paying attention and may have difficulty with learning certain subjects and completing assignments. Results of this testing, observation, and history all seem to indicate that Jacobs scores are similar to those with moderate learning disabilities.

Recommendations To the School 1. It is suggested that Jacob continue in the special education program on the results of testing and observation. To the Teacher 1. It is suggested that Jacobs teacher teach Jacob specific reading comprehension strategies during class. By teaching him these strategies, Jacob will comprehend his reading more and be able to participate in class discussions and write appropriate responses to his reading. Jacobs teacher may want to give Jacob a list of questions before he is about to read, so he will be able to pick out important information in the text in order to better comprehend the text. 2. Jacobs teacher may want to explore using word walls in language arts. Word walls are a list of words written based on a specific category such as the way words sound, words with long vowels, and even words used in specific academic subjects. Jacobs teacher may want to give him a separate sheet with the word wall words written on it, so he can have his own copy to take with him when he goes home. With this, Jacob can develop a bigger vocabulary and this will improve his word recognition skills. 3. Jacobs teacher may want to use concrete manipulatives with Jacob. Jacob has difficulty with computing problems in his head. With concrete manipulatives, his learning is hands-on and he is physically moving and changing objects to get his answer. This resource will help Jacob because he will be able to use the manipulatives to find the answer to math problems, instead of getting confused and getting the answers wrong. 4. It is suggested that Jacobs teacher use group activities to get Jacob involved in class. Jacob struggles with sharing his ideas on his own to the class, but he enjoys presenting in groups and talking with other students. If Jacobs teacher uses more group work, Jacob will share more of his ideas and be able to improve his class participation grade, with his group members there to motivate and encourage him. To the Parents 1. It is very important that Jacobs parents help him with reading. They can do this by answering questions Jacob has about his reading and helping him sound out words. This will help Jacob to read more fluently, instead of having to skip words because he doesnt know them. Once his reading becomes fluent, his reading comprehension will improve as well. 2. It is very important for Jacobs parents to practice basic facts at home. They can do this by using flashcards and quizzing Jacob every day on a few facts. This will make improve his knowledge of basic facts and he wont have as much difficulty completing higher-level problems that involve basic facts.