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July 31–August 13, 2009 4
July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009
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July 31–August 13, 2009 4
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Contents |

[ Minnesota's Gay-Lesbian-Bisexual-Transgender Magazine ]

Contents | [ Minnesota's Gay-Lesbian-Bisexual-Transgender Magazine ]

July 31–August 13, 2009

Magazine ] July 31–August 13, 2009 28 36 52   Photo by Hubert Bonnet Photo by
Magazine ] July 31–August 13, 2009 28 36 52   Photo by Hubert Bonnet Photo by

28

Magazine ] July 31–August 13, 2009 28 36 52   Photo by Hubert Bonnet Photo by
Magazine ] July 31–August 13, 2009 28 36 52   Photo by Hubert Bonnet Photo by
36
36

52

 

Photo by Hubert Bonnet

Photo by Dan Bernitt

 

Photo by Hubert Bonnet

Outdoor Adventure

Fringe Festival

The Sample Room

 

COMMUNITY DIALOGUE

 

12 A Word in Edgewise Just How Fat Is Too Fat?

35

Out in the Stands

Minnesota Twins vs. Cleveland Indians

VIVACITY

14

Three Head to World Outgames in Copenhagen • Shades of Yellow (SOY) Organizes

Queer as Folks

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

36

Fringe Festival

Features Queer Bumper Crop

 

FLAIR

FASHION

 

38

On the Townsend

Cover Feature ON THE RUNWAY

The Ballet Russes 100 Year Festival When a Man Loves a Diva Is There a Doctor in the House? The Brave New Workshop Saves the Planet; or Yes We Can, but Do We Have To?

 

16

Fashion

 
  Vivacity Flair

Vivacity Flair

20

Onward Style

40

On the Record

Shady Character

Art Brut vs. Satan Dirty King Greatest Hits Songs for Sorrow

22

Isn’t Fashion Fun

City Gentleman

Use Your Black “Bar” Tab To Find the

Feature

BAR SCENE

24

Pride in Pictures, Part 3

42

Twin Cities Bar Guide/Map

Twin Cities Pride Parade • Rochester Pride

Find Your Way to Hot Spots

42

Regional Bar Guide

OUTDOOR ADVENTURE

28

All in a Summer Season

Out-of-Town Change of Pace

44

Town House: Trover

Bartender Spotlight

46

Leather Life

Cornucopia of Outdoor Opportunities at Minneapolis Park System

32

Outwoods and Hoigaard’s Offer Insights

NEWS & POLITICS

Inside Out

A Masseur Tells All

48

Hour at Gay 90’s Complete Oldest Part of Megabar Is Now the Newest

Fabulous Renovation of Happy

Produced by Mike Hnida, Hair & Makeup by Adam Lang, Photogra- phy by Mike Hnida, Lavender Studios, Model: Darin, Clothing provided by Len Druskin - Galleria, N2N Bodywear, Accessories provided by STYLEDLIFE - Galleria

34

Big Gay News

National News

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July 31–August 13, 2009

July 31–August 13, 2009 Contents | [ Minnesota's Gay-Lesbian-Bisexual-Transgender Magazine ] 24 Photo by Sophia

Contents |

[ Minnesota's Gay-Lesbian-Bisexual-Transgender Magazine ]

Minnesota's Gay-Lesbian-Bisexual-Transgender Magazine ] 24 Photo by Sophia Hantzes Twin Cities Pride Parade 38 Photo

24

Photo by Sophia Hantzes

Twin Cities Pride Parade

38
38

Photo by Stephen Voegeli

When a Man Loves a Diva

 

50

Imperial Court of Minnesota

Coronation XVIII Organization Heads in New Direction

Coronation XVIII Organization Heads in New Direction

52

Bar Calendar

Plan Your Bar Outings

56

Chippewa Valley Pride

Eau Claire Is Closest Gay Getaway from Twin Cities

CUISINE

58

Off the Eaten Path

The Sample Room

62

Nutrition

Fat: Friend or Foe?

63

Dining Guide

Food for Every Mood

BACKTALK

66

Out in the Stars

Horoscope

66

The Network

Business Services Directory

68

 

ISSUE 370

July 31, 2009

Outdoor Adventure On the Runway

LavenderMagazine.com Calendar Plan Your Fortnight

72

Community Connection

GLBT-Friendly Nonprofits

 

74

Classifieds

Next Up

Find Some Classy Stuff

ISSUE 371

76

Ms. Behavior

August 14, 2009

Former Fatty • Confused

Gayborhood of the Year

79

Cartoon

Trolín

81

Yellow Pages Advertiser Index

What’s Where This Issue

82

Consider the Source

Grilling the Men

Issue 82 Consider the Source Grilling the Men LavenderMagazine.com New Lavender Digital Edition,
Issue 82 Consider the Source Grilling the Men LavenderMagazine.com New Lavender Digital Edition,

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Top Headlines

Rate ‘Kiss-In’ At Mormon Temple Leads To Confrontation Get Your News in 12 Languages! Big Gay

Get Your News in 12 Languages! Big Gay News now offers TWELVE foreign language newswires! You can get international GLBT news from hundreds of sources in twelve different languages. There is absolutely no other site offering this much relevant content. Visit http://biggaynews.com today!

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July 31–August 13, 2009 Volume 15, Issue 370 • July 31–August 13, 2009 Editorial Managing
July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009 Volume 15, Issue 370 • July 31–August 13, 2009 Editorial Managing Editor
July 31–August 13, 2009 Volume 15, Issue 370 • July 31–August 13, 2009 Editorial Managing Editor
July 31–August 13, 2009 Volume 15, Issue 370 • July 31–August 13, 2009 Editorial Managing Editor

Volume 15, Issue 370 • July 31–August 13, 2009

Editorial

Managing Editor Ethan Boatner 612-436-4670 Associate Editor Russell Remmick 612-436-4671 Copy Editor George Holdgrafer 612-436-4672 Podmaster Bradley Traynor 612-436-4669 Contributors Kolina Cicero, Meryl Cohn, Carla Continenza, Julie Dafydd, Chad Eldred, Heidi Fellner, Lawrence Ferber, Terrance Griep, Ed Huyck, Steve Lenius, John Michael Lerma, Charlene Lichtenstein, Jennifer Parello, Sara Rogers, Darin Schwinkendorf, Vince Sgambati, Carisa Sibbet, Elizabeth Stiras, John Townsend, Carla Waldemar

Advertising

Sales & Advertising Director Barry Leavitt 612-436-4690 Senior Account Executive Suzanne Farrell 612-436-4699 Account Executives Jonathan Halverson 612-436-4696, Michael Ladzun 612-436-4697 Sales & Advertising Traffic Coordinator Linda Raines 612-436-4694 Advertising Associate George Holdgrafer 612-436-4672 Sales & Advertising Intern Chris Wood 612-436-4695 Classifieds Suzanne Farrell 612-436-4699 National Sales Representative Rivendell Media

212-242-6863

Creative

Creative Director Hubert Bonnet 612-436-4678 Creative Assistants Carisa Sibbet 612-436-4677, Mike Hnida 612-436-4679 Photographer Sophia Hantzes Cartoonist Rodro Lavender Studios Hubert Bonnet, Mike Hnida

Administration

Publisher Lavender Media, Inc. President & CEO Stephen Rocheford 612-436-4665 Vice President & CC Pierre Tardif 612-436-4666 Chief Financial Officer Carolyn Lima 612-436-4664

Administrative Assistant Austin Lindstrom 612-436-4661

Founders George Holdgrafer, Stephen Rocheford Inspiration Steven W. Anderson (1954-1994), Timothy J. Lee (1968-2002), Russell Berg (1957-2005), Kathryn Rocheford

(1914-2006)

Letters are subject to editing for grammar, punctuation, space, and libel. They should be no more than 300 words. Letters must include name, address, and phone number. Unsigned letters will not be published. Priority will be given to letters that refer to material previously published in Lavender Magazine. Submit let- ters to Lavender Magazine, Letters to the Editor, 3715 Chicago Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55407; or e-mail <editor@lav- endermagazine.com>.

Lavender Media Inc. 3715 Chicago Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55407 LavenderYellowPages.com 612-436-4660 phone 877-515-9969 toll free 612-436-4685 fax 612-436-4664 subscriptions 612-436-4671 distribution To advertise, call 612-436-4698

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8 LavenderMagazine.com BigGayNews.com WandaWisdom.com Entire contents copyright 2009. All rights reserved.
8 LavenderMagazine.com BigGayNews.com WandaWisdom.com Entire contents copyright 2009. All rights reserved.

Entire contents copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Publication of the name or photograph of any person, organization, or business in this magazine does not reflect upon one’s sexual orientation whatsoever. Lavender® Magazine reserves the right to refuse any advertising. This issue of Lavender Magazine is available free of charge during the time period published on the cover. Pickup at one of our distribution sites is limited to one copy per person.

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Community Dialogue > A Word in Edgewise

[ by E.B. Boatner ]

Community Dialogue > A Word in Edgewise [ by E.B. Boatner ]

Just How Fat Is Too Fat?

“Is Surgeon General Ap- pointee Too Fat?” a recent Fox news segment asked. The interviewee, sporting a T- shirt emblazoned “No Chub- bies,” estimated that Dr. Re- gina Benjamin was “50 to 60 pounds” overweight, proving she is “lazy,” and makes “poor food choices.” I first read about President Barack Obama’s recent pick for the post of Surgeon General in the February 2006 Reader’s Digest. Benjamin, then 49, of Bayou La Batre, Alabama, was fea- tured because of her heroic work for her town and her clinic, ravaged by Hurricane Katrina. According to the Digest, Benjamin had used her own money to start the clinic in 1990 in the shrimping village of 2,300, one third of whose inhabitants were from Viet- nam, Laos, and Cambodia. In 1998, she re- built the clinic after Hurricane Georges. In 2005, Benjamin and her nurse again

Hurricane Georges. In 2005, Benjamin and her nurse again donned rubber gloves, and worked to clean

donned rubber gloves, and worked to clean up after Katrina. The rebuilt clinic was to have opened on January 2, 2006, but was gutted by fire on New Year’s Day. Benja- min, undaunted, started over again. Quoted as saying, “The patients keep me going,” Benjamin makes house calls, treats those who cannot pay, and helps buy the medicines she prescribes. A graduate of Xavier University, More- house School of Medicine, and the Univer- sity of Alabama School of Medicine, Ben- jamin was a 1998 Mandela Award Winner, a former Kellogg National Fellow, and a 2008 recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship (the so-called “genius” grant). In 1995, she became the first African-American woman under 40 to be elected to the American Medical Association Board of Trustees. This “lazy” woman’s commitment to delivering primary care to rural and under- served communities is a valuable resource

for someone who will need to look at the big health picture in America. After her nomination, Benjamin comment- ed, “My hope is to be America’s doctor, Amer- ica’s family physician. I want to ensure that no one—no one—falls through the cracks, as we improve our health care system.” Denise Stewart in The Root quotes Bayou La Batre Mayor Stan Wright as saying, “It means we may be losing a good doctor, but it also means the whole United States will have a good doctor.” In full disclosure, I was so moved by the Reader’s Digest article that I have sent donations to Benjamin’s clinic, and would be happy to see her in the position of Surgeon General. But this column is written not as a push for Benjamin—there are, no doubt, many dedicated, qualified candidates for the post in this country—but rather as a plea to judge candidates on their record, not on

their race, gender, or avoirdupois.

as a plea to judge candidates on their record, not on their race, gender, or avoirdupois.
July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009
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Queer As Folks |

Queer As Folks |
Queer As Folks | Photo by E.B. Boatner Three Head to World Outgames in Copenhagen The

Photo by E.B. Boatner

Three Head to World Outgames in Copenhagen

The second annual World Outgames is a little more local with three community members competing > in this year’s event in Copenhagen, Denmark. Doug Caldwell ran the 5K on July 26; Dr. Paul Mittelstadt will compete in the Olympic Distance Triathlon on August 1; and Terrell Brown is participating in five separate swimming events plus a RainBow Random Relay over four days. World Outgames is an inter- national event for the body, mind, and spirit, celebrating the talents and contributions of homosexual, bisexual, and transgender men and women from every corner of the globe Though it is geared toward the GLBT community, heterosexual men and women are equally welcomed to participate. The 2009 Outgames, July 25 through August 2, encompasses 38 different sports.

(From left) Dr. Paul Mittelstadt, Doug Caldwell, and Terrell Brown celebrated at a bon voyage party, as they prepared to leave for the 2009 World Outgames in Copenhagen, Denmark.

  Shades of Yellow (SOY) Organizes
 

Shades of Yellow (SOY) Organizes

>

Shades of Yellow is an organization that was formed based on the personal experiences of Phai Xiong and Xeng Lor, two gay men in the Hmong community. The duo felt that they, among other GLBT individuals in the Hmong community, were invisible, marginalized, and in need of support. SOY has taken on the role of confronting this isolation through services in education, cultural awareness, social gatherings, and advocacy. Executive Director Kevin Xiong said, “I’ve received so many criticisms from the community on the existence of SOY. This is the exact reason why I want to make SOY a strong and effective organization.” For more information, visit <www.myspace.com/shadesofyellow_hmong>, or call (651) 291-1811, ext. 201.

Photo by Sophia Hantzes

Shades of Yellow Executive Director Kevin Xiong.

July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009
ext. 201. Photo by Sophia Hantzes Shades of Yellow Executive Director Kevin Xiong. July 31–August 13,
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July 31–August 13, 2009

July 31–August 13, 2009 Vivacity Vivacity Flair Flair Produced Produced by by Mike Mike Hnida Hnida

Vivacity Vivacity Flair Flair

Produced Produced by by Mike Mike Hnida Hnida

Hair Hair & & Makeup Makeup by by Adam Adam Lang Lang

Photography Photography by by Mike Mike Hnida, Hnida, Lavender Lavender Studios Studios

Model: Model: Darin Darin

Clothing Clothing provided provided by by Len Len Druskin Druskin - - Galleria, Galleria, N2N N2N Bodywear Bodywear

Accessories Accessories provided provided by by STYLEDLIFE STYLEDLIFE - - Galleria Galleria

LavenderMagazine.com

Copa Sport swimsuit $26, N2N Bodywear Fleur-de-lis pendant necklace $58, STYLEDLIFE

July 31–August 13, 2009

John John Varvatos Varvatos black black leather leather jacket jacket with with removable removable sleeves sleeves $995, $995,

G G Star Star screen screen print print tee tee $80, $80,

Levi Levi Raw Raw denim denim $138, $138,

Timberland Timberland black black ankle ankle tie tie boot boot $260, $260, Len Len Druskin Druskin

Fad Fad Treasures Treasures tarnished tarnished double double gate gate wallet wallet chain chain $98, $98,

Fad Fad Treasures Treasures small small chain chain link link and and leather leather bracelet bracelet $68, $68,

Fad Fad Treasures Treasures leather leather cuff cuff $48, $48, STYLEDLIFE STYLEDLIFE

bracelet $68, $68, Fad Fad Treasures Treasures leather leather cuff cuff $48, $48, STYLEDLIFE STYLEDLIFE 18

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Ben Sherman black and white stripe jacket $239, Gregory Quinn white V-neck tee $56, Rag & Bone black pant $250, Gordon Rush black slip on loafer $126, Len Druskin Missoni black and white scarf $210, STYLEDLIFE

On the Runway > Onward Style

[ by Sara Rogers ]

July 31–August 13, 2009

Shady Character

Hot picks from MOA ® Trend Specialist Sara Rogers

Whether you wear them to block the sun’s harmful rays, to hide yourself from the paparazzi or because you had one too many martinis last night, there are a million reasons to own a great pair of sunglasses! Just like apparel and shoes, sunglasses follow their own trend curve each season so check out the stylish pairs below to make sure your eyes are covered in style.

pairs below to make sure your eyes are covered in style. RIMLESS SOLSTICE / LEVEL 1,
pairs below to make sure your eyes are covered in style. RIMLESS SOLSTICE / LEVEL 1,
pairs below to make sure your eyes are covered in style. RIMLESS SOLSTICE / LEVEL 1,

RIMLESS

SOLSTICE / LEVEL 1, WEST (W131)

If you’re tired of going incognito in over- sized sunglass styles, pick up a pair of chic, rimless shades. Gucci even agrees that it’s time to show more of your beautiful face to the world so they’ve brought back their classic rimless style with a few new twists.

AVIATORS

BLOOMINGDALE’S

Once made famous by the classic Tom Cruise flick Top Gun, Aviators are back with a vengeance for the hipster crowd. With gold accents and brand name labels, the new aviators are more about looking ‘fly’ than taking flight.

are more about looking ‘fly’ than taking flight. GOOD SPORT OAKLEY / LEVEL 1, NORTH (N107)

GOOD SPORT

OAKLEY / LEVEL 1, NORTH (N107)

In addition to lookin’ good on the outside, this pair of Jaw Bone LIVESTRONG™ shades from Oakley are also about feelin’ good on the inside. Each pair purchased benefits the Lance Armstrong foundation which supports the fight against cancer.

PLASTIC

SOLSTICE / LEVEL 1, WEST (W131)

If you spent your elementary school years in glasses, this Oliver Peoples pair may look eerily familiar. The plastic eye glass frame style from back in the day has re-emerged as a top trend for summer. Pocket protec- tor not included.

PATTERN

PUMA / LEVEL 1, NORTH (N106)

Unique patterns and prints were all over the runways for spring apparel – and now it looks like the trend has migrated to the world of sunglasses. This funky black & white pair from Puma is the perfect way to wear a trend without going overboard.

is the perfect way to wear a trend without going overboard. Onward Style is Lavender’s exclusive

Onward Style is Lavender’s exclusive column written by Sara Rogers, MOA ® Trend Specialist. She has worked in the fashion industry for more than 20 years as a model, fashion specialist, wardrobe therapist, and television host. As the Trend Specialist and Personal Shopper for Mall of America ® , her “office” spans 4.2 million square feet and more than 520 stores, providing her with extensive resources to research what’s hot in retail trends.

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On the Runway > Isn't Fashion Fun

[ by Tim Creagan ]

July 31–August 13, 2009

Fashion Fun [ by Tim Creagan ] July 31–August 13, 2009 City Gentleman T he City

City Gentleman

T he City Gentleman is a refined man who has not lost his edge. So too are his accessories, pol-

ished and hip

The City Gentleman likes his music.

never contrived or stuffy.

While Red Martini is the perfect choice for

an at home CD, when on the run

is the way to go. The sleek iPod case from Dunhill is as cool as his choices in music. When on a date, the City Gentleman is quick to pick up the tab for the man of his dreams. Cash and a card are held secure in this mock alligator money clip. For a guy who is a City Gentleman, be- ing on time for a show or workout is essen- tial. A watch from Android keeps time and looks sexy on the wrist. Details count! Whether the splash of color, unexpected cufflink or dashing hat one or two are a must every day. When it is time to unwind at the end of the night the Dunhill Sidecar ball point pen is a perfect writing companion when sitting down to write the lyrics to a song or do a journal entry for a future autobiography. If you are the kind of guy who appreciates

an iPod

the fine things in life, but still can navigate

downtown and the late night party are a City Gentleman.

you too

and the late night party are a City Gentleman. you too Isn’t Fashion Fun is your
and the late night party are a City Gentleman. you too Isn’t Fashion Fun is your
and the late night party are a City Gentleman. you too Isn’t Fashion Fun is your

Isn’t Fashion Fun is your monthly go-to resource for tips, suggestions, and fashion expertise on how style-related material plays into your wardrobe and vis-à-vis your busy life. Isn’t Fashion Fun is brought to you by fashion leader STYLEDLIFE ® and the wardrobe experts ® team at styledlook ® , the premier at-home wardrobe consulting company with clients nationwide. Got a big event or hot date coming up, and don’t know what to wear? No worries—we’re here for you. What’s the best accessory gift or music CD for a particular recipient? Yes, we can dial you in on that, too. E-mail all of your fashion questions and/or wardrobe dilemmas to <info@wardrobeexperts.com>. You deserve to look your best, feel your best, and strut your stuff looking dynamite! Isn’t fashion fun.

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2009 PRIDE in Pictures

2009 P R I D E in Pictures Twin Cities Pride Parade June 28 Minneapolis Part
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Twin Cities Pride Parade June 28 Minneapolis Part
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Twin Cities Pride Parade June 28 Minneapolis Part
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Twin Cities Pride Parade June 28 Minneapolis Part
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Twin Cities Pride Parade June 28 Minneapolis Part

Twin Cities Pride Parade

June 28

Minneapolis

Part 3
Part 3
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Twin Cities Pride Parade June 28 Minneapolis Part
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Twin Cities Pride Parade June 28 Minneapolis Part
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Twin Cities Pride Parade June 28 Minneapolis Part

Photos by Sophia Hantzes

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2009 PRIDE in Pictures

2009 P R I D E in Pictures Rochester Pride July 11 Rochester Part 3 Photos
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Rochester Pride July 11 Rochester Part 3 Photos
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Rochester Pride July 11 Rochester Part 3 Photos
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Rochester Pride July 11 Rochester Part 3 Photos
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Rochester Pride July 11 Rochester Part 3 Photos

Rochester Pride

July 11

Rochester

Part 3
Part 3
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Rochester Pride July 11 Rochester Part 3 Photos
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Rochester Pride July 11 Rochester Part 3 Photos
2009 P R I D E in Pictures Rochester Pride July 11 Rochester Part 3 Photos

Photos by Sophia Hantzes

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July 31–August 13, 2009

> Outdoor Adventure

July 31–August 13, 2009 > Outdoor Adventure ALL IN A SUMMER SEASON CORNUCOPIA OF OUTDOOR OPPORTUNITIES

ALL IN A

SUMMER SEASON

13, 2009 > Outdoor Adventure ALL IN A SUMMER SEASON CORNUCOPIA OF OUTDOOR OPPORTUNITIES AT MINNEAPOLIS

CORNUCOPIA OF OUTDOOR OPPORTUNITIES AT MINNEAPOLIS PARK SYSTEM

[ by Chad Eldred ]

S o, the biggest Twin Cities event of the summer for many inside and outside the GLBT community, Pride, has come and gone. As well, two summer months al- ready have faded into the past.

Despite the presence of noticeably cooler winds drifting in with greater and greater force, not all is lost. Just ask Dawn Sommers, Public Information and Marketing Manager for the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB).

Sommers says, “Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board’s regional parks attract 18 million visits a year, and offer a host of outdoor opportunities year-round for a diverse population. Minneapolis has the coun- try’s only urban scenic byway, the Grand Rounds, a 53-mile parkway complemented by bike and pedestrian trails, historical

sites, and scenic landscapes. The

Minneapolis park system is an urban nirvana, so people do not need to travel beyond Minneap- olis to experience the outdoors. Depending on the park location and the activity, the parks are hip and trendy; peaceful and refreshing; and energizing and invigorating. The parks are a great place to visit for a few hours or all day.” But the summer possibilities don’t stop at the parks—or paths, for that matter. From biking to hik- ing to movies and more, Minneapolis has a variety of outdoor venues everyone should take advantage of before fall comes a-knocking.

SUMMER FUN!
SUMMER FUN!
take advantage of before fall comes a-knocking. SUMMER FUN! 1 CONCERTS Running through early September, free

1 CONCERTS

Running through early September, free concerts take place at a multitude of locations, including Lake Harriet, Minnehaha Falls, Father Hennepin Bluffs, and Bryant Square Park. The concerts feature some- thing for every musical taste: jazz, Latin, folk, rock, and bluegrass. Sommers notes, “Performances range from full

bluegrass. Sommers notes, “Performances range from full Sailing on Lake Harriet . Photos by Hubert Bonnet

Sailing on Lake Harriet. Photos by Hubert Bonnet

orchestral and jazz ensembles to community cho- rales and original solo artists. Bring a picnic, come early, or stay late to explore the parks.”

2 MOVIES IN THE PARK

Many neighborhood parks host a variety of free movie nights loaded with films from every genre, in- cluding classics, comedy, drama, and newer releases. For example, Loring Park partners with Walker Art Center for Movies and Music, spotlighting Paul New- man flicks. For pet enthusiasts, Canines for Clean Wa- ter presents dog-oriented movies, with dog-focused activities and environmental education.

3 CANOEING, KAYAKING, AND SAILBOATING

Minnesota isn’t known as the Land of 10,000 Lakes for nothing, so get out there and enjoy the

OBVIOUSLY, THEY USE HOTELS THAT ARE PET-FRIENDLY. OTHER CAST THEIR PETS. THE SHOW ITSELF EMPLOYS TWO CHIHUAHUAS AND TWO BULLDOGS WHO STAY WITH THEIR HANDLERS. GULSVIG SHARES THAT BONDING.

natural resources this state has to offer be- fore they freeze over. Sailing lessons are available at Lake Harriet. Or, Sommers recommends canoeing the lakes with a nat- uralist to learn about a lake, its history, and its wildlife. Why not try your luck at catch- ing the big one while you’re at it?

4 TRAIL TRAVELING

Explore the Mississippi River by trail, starting at St. Anthony Falls, and rolling or strolling down West River Parkway six miles to Minnehaha Park. Then, reward yourself with lunch and drinks at Sea Salt. View the historic falls and the Mississippi River from a variety of breathtaking overlooks. Sommers suggests Eloise Butler Wild-

flower Garden in Wirth Park. This 15-acre garden is home to more than 500 plant spe- cies and 140 bird species. It has spectacular seasonal displays of native wildflowers in woodland, wetland, and prairie areas. The trail has 49 interpretive stations for guided and self-guided tours. The most popular paved walking and biking trails are the ones that wind around the Chain of Lakes. Lake Calhoun never is at a lack for visitors. For those looking to walk, or take a look at walkers, the beaches are a great way to spend an afternoon.

5 GOLF

Providing five 18-hole and two 9-hole

courses,

Minneapolis

courses

are

an

five 18-hole and two 9-hole courses, Minneapolis courses are an Kayaking on Lake Calhoun. LavenderMagazine.com 29
Kayaking on Lake Calhoun. LavenderMagazine.com
Kayaking on Lake Calhoun.
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July 31–August 13, 2009

July 31–August 13, 2009 Jazz Festival in Downtown Minneapolis . Biking on Midtown Greenway . House,

Jazz Festival in Downtown Minneapolis.

31–August 13, 2009 Jazz Festival in Downtown Minneapolis . Biking on Midtown Greenway . House, the

Biking on Midtown Greenway.

House, the oldest surviving frame home in the Twin Cities, in Chute Square, across the Mississippi from Downtown. In Min- nehaha Park are Stevens House, the first wood frame dwelling west of the Missis- sippi, and Longfellow House, a replica of the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s home in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

9 MINNEAPOLIS BIKE TOUR

Cap the summer with the Minneapolis Bike Tour on September 20. The 14-mile route around the Chain of Lakes is perfect for families, kids, and biking novices. The 37-mile route on the Grand Rounds may take some training, but it’s still a doable family out- ing. Closed to all motorized traffic, the routes offer refreshments and bike mechanics.

traffic, the routes offer refreshments and bike mechanics. [Outdoor Adventure] inexpensive yet challenging way to enjoy

[Outdoor Adventure]

inexpensive yet challenging way to enjoy a round of golf. Sommers says, “Several are award-win- ning, have hosted national tournaments, and have Audubon designation.” Never golfed before? Get a feel for the sport at the new miniature golf course at Northeast Park.

6 GARDEN GAZING

Walk among elegant roses at Lyndale Park Rose Garden, or amid rocks, conifers, and sculptures at Peace Garden. Check out the blooms at Longfellow Garden, which went organic this year. Minneapolis Sculpture Garden displays works of art by leading American and international artists among plazas, walkways, and plantings.

7 BIKING

For those who want a woodland expe-

rience, Wirth Park has the just-completed Luce Line Trail and an off-road cycling

trail. Get off the bike for a nature walk through Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden, or along the Quaking Bog boardwalk. If you want a trip with an urban feel,

try out the newly repaved

St. Anthony Parkway from Stinson Avenue to the Camden Bridge, with its challenging climb up Deming Heights, the highest point in the Twin Cities.

8 HISTORY LESSONS

Take a step back in time to when lum- ber mills and flour mills dominated Minne- apolis commerce at Mill Ruins Park, where mills, canals, and tailraces have been exca- vated. Historic homes include Ard Godfrey

While Minnesota may be known better for its harsh winters and mountainous bliz- zards, Sommers knows better, and hopes thousands of others will, too. Sommers shares, “A re- cent survey by the Minneap- olis Parks Foundation found

overwhelming public per-

SUMMER FUN!

ception that the Minneapolis Park System is the ‘jewel in the crown’ of the city’s qual- ity of life. Ninety-nine per- cent see the parks and lakes as a unique and valuable asset for the city, and 96 percent favorably rate the quality, overall appear- ance, and maintenance of the Minneapolis Park System.” For more information, or for even more ideas about how to spend the remainder of

your summer, check out the MPRB Web

site at <www.minneapolisparks.org>.

LavenderMagazine.com 31
LavenderMagazine.com 31
LavenderMagazine.com 31
LavenderMagazine.com
LavenderMagazine.com

> Outdoor Adventure

INSIDE OUT

OUTWOODS AND HOIGAARD’S OFFER INSIGHTS

[ by Terrance Griep ]

T he very best way to put it is this: What you do outside is
T he very best way to put it is this: What you do outside is
To encourage safety and responsi-
bility in the outdoors.
an expression of who you are inside. That’s not Doctor
To serve as an education and infor-
Phil talking, but rather a practical reality.
Just ask Dan Vega, ardent member of Outwoods.
He’s a biking enthusiast and an amateur photographer.
Recalling some recent Outwoods-
hosted outdoor adventures, Vega says,
“We went out in the woods, and took
pictures at camp sites. We’ve also done
some cycling.”
According to its Web site, Outwoods
“is a vehicle for the gay, lesbian, bisexual,
and transgendered (GLBT) community
and their friends in Minnesota and adjacent
states to publicize quality, enjoyable, non-
competitve, outdoor recreational activities.”
Vega adds, “Outwoods is a way to
connect with other members of the
GLBT community. There is something
for anyone who wants to join.”
Outwoods is observing its 20th anni-
versary this year. The group’s longevity is
mational resource concerning all the or-
ganization’s values.
Each outdoor adventure employs
these principles to some degree.
Any member is allowed to propose a
trip, and when it comes to be, he or she
serves as that journey’s alpha, leading the
other members through the twists and
no accident. It’s the direct result of a la-
serlike focus brought to brightest gleam
by virtue of the core values:
turns of the adventure.
Recent events included two different ur-
ban camera safaris. Gayly enough, each was
To bring members of this commu-
nity together in a sharing, supportive, re-
spectful, and cooperative atmosphere.
themed: One was “Word on the Street,” and
the other was “Yellow.” Evening paddles and
strolls have appeared in the recent sched-
To foster a spirit of enjoyment and
appreciation for the natural environment,
and its conservation and protection.
ule…happily, not at the same time.
Sometimes, the expression of who you
Photo by Hubert Bonnet
July 31–August 13, 2009

are can manifest differently where open-air adventuring is concerned, according to Ryan Anderson, Advertising Manager for outdoor equipment and clothing retailer Hoigaard’s. Anderson muses, “‘Outdoor Adventure’ definitely means a lot of different things to different people. For me, I tend to think about things like riding my bike along the trails in both the Twin Cities and Northern Minnesota, and stopping for lunch and a lo- cal beer along the way.” And if Anderson is without wheels? No problem. Other forms of adventuring include, in Anderson’s words, “biking and camping in Minnesota’s great state parks and forests, and snowboarding both on the hills in the Mid- west and in the mountains outside of Minne- sota. I love that I don’t have to travel in order to do these things, yet the option still exists.” Anderson, whose passion is as obvious as his expertise, shares, “I’m certainly no Griz- zly Adams, but I’d like to think that I can handle the outdoors without complaining too much. I work at Hoigaard’s, so I’d say that enjoying the outdoors is required!” Sometimes, the unadventurous inside world bleeds into adventuring in abstract

ways—in the form of attitudes. As Anderson explains, “I think people often think of people who enjoy the out- doors as hippies and health nuts. Is that good or bad? I’m not really sure. I’ve never thought of myself as either, and while gra- nola isn’t part of my vernacular, it might be fitting, at least in a comical sense, for some outdoor enthusiasts.” Vega, who also has brushed up against the prejudiced expectations of the more urban- centric, relates, “They don’t picture gay men and women—or anyone else in the GLBT community—doing outdoor stuff. When they find out about Outwoods, they’re kind of taken aback. They don’t think it’s real.” And the dependable tilting of the Earth has no effect on these outdoor stalwarts…unless it’s to steel the resolve of true adventurers. Commenting on seasonal shifts and how they affect aspirant adventurers, Anderson observes, “It definitely varies from person to person, though in Minnesota, there seems to be a lot of overlap. I originally got into snow- boarding after skateboarding for years.” Anderson, whose experience is second- hand as well as firsthand, points out, “A lot of my friends who ski—both downhill and

cross country—are avid cyclists. Others en- joy canoeing and kayaking, or camping. I think our common ideal is to get outside, and have fun, regardless of weather—with- in reason, of course!” Vega corroborates Anderson’s observa- tions: “Definitely, in wintertime, there’s less to do in the outdoors, because, you know, it’s frigid cold. We in Outwoods do go out, though. There are picture-taking events. Some of us go out for cross-country skiing and snowboarding—stuff like that.” That said, its fleeting nature makes sum- mer seem like Minnesota’s most precious season—the time when self-expression is its most profound. Anderson offers this simple sugges- tion: “Play outside. Summer is short. En-

joy it!”

tion: “Play outside. Summer is short. En- joy it!” OUTW OODS PO BO X 8855 MINNEAPOLIS,

OUTWOODS PO BOX 8855 MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55408 <WWW.OUTWOODS.ORG>

HOIGAARDS 5425 EXCELSIOR BLVD., ST. LOUIS PARK (952) 929-1351 <WWW.HOIGAARDS.COM>

LavenderMagazine.com
LavenderMagazine.com
July 31–August 13, 2009 Big Gay News > [ Written & Compiled by Bradley Traynor
July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009

Big Gay News >

July 31–August 13, 2009 Big Gay News > [ Written & Compiled by Bradley Traynor ]
July 31–August 13, 2009 Big Gay News > [ Written & Compiled by Bradley Traynor ]

[ Written & Compiled by Bradley Traynor ]

NATIONAL NEWS
NATIONAL NEWS

KISS-IN AT MORMON TEMPLE LEADS TO CONFRONTATION

In early July, a mass kiss-in near a Mor- mon temple in Utah made headlines after two gay men were removed from the prem- ises and cited for trespassing after security guards observed them kissing. About 100 people attended the protest. Demonstra- tors were greeted by a group of counter- protesters carrying large signs denouncing homosexuality. A shouting match erupted between the groups, but no one was ar- rested or cited besides the two men.

FORT WORTH MAYOR APOLOGIZES FOR RAID ON GAY BAR

Fort Worth Mayor Mike Moncrief has apologized for a raid on one of the city’s gay bars in June that left one victim hospitalized. The mayor and city officials briefly discussed the incident at City Hall. After someone called out for an apology, Moncrief said, “If you want an apology from the Mayor of Fort Worth—I am sor- ry about what happened in Fort Worth.” The Texas Alcohol Beverage Commission and Fort Worth Police Department are investigating the raid, which was conduct- ed jointly by their agencies.

EPISCOPAL CHURCH OKS OPENLY GAY CLERGY

by their agencies. EPISCOPAL CHURCH OKS OPENLY GAY CLERGY The Episcopal Church, the US branch of

The Episcopal Church, the US branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, approved a measure to allow the ordina- tion of openly gay and lesbian clergy. It passed by wide margins in both decision- making bodies of the church. The reso- lution affirmed: “God has called and may call such individuals [gay or lesbians] to any ordained ministry in The Episcopal Church.” Adoption of the measure comes as divisions between liberals and conser- vatives have threatened a schism within

the worldwide church.

measure comes as divisions between liberals and conser- vatives have threatened a schism within the worldwide

Preview |

Preview | Out in the Stands Lavender ’s Summer of Pride Continues 2008 Out in the

Out in the Stands

Lavender ’s Summer of Pride Continues

| Out in the Stands Lavender ’s Summer of Pride Continues 2008 Out in the Stands.

2008 Out in the Stands. Photo by Sophia Hantzes

C rowd-pleasing Out in the Stands

makes its third annual appearance

on August 15, Noon-2:30 PM.

Festivities kick off at Noon with the Miller Lite Pregame Picnic, catered by Park Tavern, at the Aloft Hotel courtyard, 900 Washington Avenue South, Minneapolis. Next, a Pregame Celebration takes place at the Metrodome, 34 Kirby Puckett Place, Minneapolis. Finally, at 2:50 PM, fans will watch our Minnesota Twins versus the Cleveland In- dians at the Metrodome. Whether you’re an athlete or an ath- letic supporter, this fun day at the Twins game is a community favorite. It’s a great way to bring all different parts of the com- munity together. Event tickets, $25 each, include the pregame picnic, a complimentary gift bag, and great seats at the Twins versus Cleve- land game. In addition to watching an exciting sporting event, your ticket sale will benefit a number of local groups: All God’s Chil- dren Metropolitan Community Church, Arena Dance, Brothers Circle/Pillsbury House, Furballers Softball Team, Guthrie Theater, Minneapolis Movie Bears, Min- nesota GLBTA Campus Alliance, North Country Bears, PFLAG, South Central Minnesota Pride, and Strange Capers. Tickets can be purchased at <laven- dermagazine.com/summerofpride>, or by contacting any of the foregoing organiza-

tions.

dermagazine.com/summerofpride>, or by contacting any of the foregoing organiza- tions. LavenderMagazine.com 35
LavenderMagazine.com
LavenderMagazine.com

July 31–August 13, 2009

> Arts & Entertainment

FRINGE FESTIVAL

Featurers Queer Bumper Crop

Entertainment FRINGE FESTIVAL Featurers Queer Bumper Crop The Actor's Nightmare . Photo by Michelle Schwantes W
Entertainment FRINGE FESTIVAL Featurers Queer Bumper Crop The Actor's Nightmare . Photo by Michelle Schwantes W

The Actor's Nightmare. Photo by Michelle Schwantes

W e rightly applaud estab- lished theaters for stag- ing queer plays, but it’s crucial that more experi- mental, grassroots queer

work gets nurtured. That’s why the Minneso- ta Fringe Festival is so vital for tracking cur- rents cutting the edge of the queer zeitgeist.

Fringe Festival Communications Di- rector Matthew Foster calls it a “proving ground for new talent and new voices, es- pecially for people who for whatever reason don’t have the résumé or wherewithal to ac- cess a big established theater.” Hence, Fringe always features numer- ous queer shows running about an hour each at various Minneapolis venues plus St. Paul’s Gremlin Theatre. Same-sex marriage gets warm laughs in Joanie Loves Chachi. Playwright Robert Thompson centers on two brothers. One is gay and getting married, while the other, in Thompson’s words, is “very not gay, and very not on board with the proceedings. For these two, it’s kind of like Richard Sim- mons colliding with Dick Cheney.”

[ by John Townsend ]

mons colliding with Dick Cheney.” [ by John Townsend ] The Gayer Show . Photo by

The Gayer Show. Photo by Dan Bernitt

A black straight woman gets impreg- nated by her white gay friend in Oops, with Colin Waitt—who wrote the script—and Jasmine Rush. Waitt says, “As a gay man, an unplanned pregnancy seems like nothing I’d ever have to worry about. So, I thought it would be great fodder for comedy to cre- ate characters like me and my friends, and see how they have to deal with it.” Trans actors perform Lane McKiernan’s Food Shelf Follies, drawn from real-life ex-

periences. What happens when competing identities and issues within a single person affect one’s well-being? Being disabled, be- ing trans, and being poor present their own specific, separate problems. When playwright Rachel Nelson work- shopped her pansexual Mammal Stories, she realized that “the process of coming out as yourself can be terrifying for anybody— straight, bisexual, or deeply queer. In the privacy of our own homes, we all have atyp-

LavenderMagazine.com

ical identities, and we all have atypical sexualities.” Asked if his solo show Moby Dick Tonight! honors the intrinsic homoeroticism within Herman Melville’s milestone novel, adaptor Loren Niemi answers, “Yes. I am not shying away from it. I treat the homoerotic relationship of Ishmael and Queequeg as a given.”

Kentucky’s Dan Ber- nitt and LA’s Les Kurkendaal give us The Gayer Show. Bernitt shares, “Les cracks me up. He sent me his portion of the performance, and I wrote my monologues around the ideas he explored. What’s so in- teresting to me about the piece is that though Les and I are 20 years apart, our experiences are surprisingly alike.” Bernitt also reprises Phi Alpha Gamma, his chilling solo piece on frat boy homopho- bia, which was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in Drama. Peter Neofotis takes on frats, too, in his solo piece Concord, Virginia. He explains that protagonist “Simon Donald is put on trial after a few fraternity brothers walk in on him performing oral sex on his lover, who, embarrassed, feigns that he was passed out, and panics. Mr. Donald is also the town’s prized rose gardener. The friends he gained through his gardening, including some grand Southern matriarchs, banish old prejudices, and defend him in court.” Brian Columbus and Nancy Ruyle wrote The William Williams Effect, based on the 1905 transcript, letters, and news articles about the last man executed in Minnesota. Columbus notes, “The precise relation- ship between Williams and teenager John- nie Keller remains ambiguous to this day, likely a result of family dynamics, as well as taboos around homosexuality at the turn of the last century. Despite what appears to be some acceptance early on of Williams’s presence in Johnnie’s life, we know that his parents tried to separate him from Williams on numerous occasions.” Top-notch gay satirist Dennis LeFeb- vre, of the zany Marvel Ann troupe, waxes lesbianic with The Bee-Lievers, a dark com- edy about Julie Fast (Kelly Gilpatrick), a closeted teenage girl who joins a les-bee-an bee-worshipping cult in the early ’70s. He observes that it addresses “obsession with ‘the second coming,’ and how everything can be interpreted as ‘a sign.’ I wanted to explore the Christian notion of an afterlife, and how fears about it can be exploited.”

of an afterlife, and how fears about it can be exploited.” Oops . Photo by Cody

Oops. Photo by Cody Baldwin

about it can be exploited.” Oops . Photo by Cody Baldwin GRRL . Photo by Salvatore

GRRL. Photo by Salvatore Salerno

Kushner Celebration star Jim Lichtscheidl directs the all-female cast. Iconic performer Heidi Arneson’s GRRL! lets loose on the breakdown of language and the proliferation of plastic. She tells us, “From S&M games with neighbor boys to lesbian costume parties to making love with partners made of plastic, GRRL! gets her groove on in any way she possibly can. Not to be cubbyholed, not to be downsized, not to be made extinct, this raging female ex- emplifies the pratfalls and poignancy of a human heart trying to connect, in the face of past shame, present consumerism, and future disaster—all while donning a series of fabulous outfits.” Fringe Encore Winner Allegra Lingo updates Greek myth in Crescendo. Accord- ing to her, it’s “interwoven with small glimpses of my life with my fiancée, Amy, and our dog, James, as we continue to carve our own place in the world, and plan our life together in the face of a society which doesn’t quite understand or accept us for either our sexuality or our commitment to our arts: me, the writer; she the knitter.” Crescendo incorporates gay composer Aaron Copland’s transcendent music. Iconoclastic Mic Weinblatt points out that his new play triptych Needs, Wants, Desires “was conceived with the notion that gay people seem to be looking for similar things: a flawless body, an object of de- sire, and the perfect partner. Latana [Re- nee Karen Werbowski] in Needs discovers a repairman in the doctor’s office, and in a desperate attempt for image validation, al- lows him to thoroughly examine her body. When the real doctor appears, she decides to stay with the Dunwoody graduate, be- cause he’s more familiar with her body. In Wants, when a strange object is delivered to June and Ward’s new home, it brings out the latent bisexual tendencies in both of them, as they deliberate where to ‘put’ the object for maximum satisfaction.” Weinblatt lovers will like outrageous gay

satisfaction.” Weinblatt lovers will like outrageous gay Concord, Virginia . Photo Courtesy of Minnesota Fringe

Concord, Virginia. Photo Courtesy of Minnesota Fringe Festival

playwright Christopher Durang, whose clas- sic The Actor’s Nightmare spins characters de- scribed by director Carney Gray as “‘hyper- sexual.’ He does this in an effort to unhinge social attitudes toward sexual behavior.” Gray also plays the role of George as gay. In similar spirit, Professor Damon Rud- man, creator of The Problem of the Body, re- marks, “We are mired in conventional out- looks. My mission is to flush them away with a torrent of provocative evidence from soci- eties that were much more open about bodi- ly urges. I touch on the advent of modern gay identity in early 1700s and lesbian ‘Bos- ton Marriages’ in the late 1800s. Through- out history, the ideal of resisting or ‘rising above’ bodily appetites has been repeatedly employed to differentiate. Projection of re- pressed desires onto ‘others’ has time and again abetted all manners of bigotry. It has also been divisive within individuals, compel- ling many to compartmentalize, to construct public masks behind which they struggle to hide their shameful private ‘failings’ from others and often from themselves.” Two stellar young directors are worth checking out. Paul Von Stoetzel stages The Underachiever’s Manifesto, which reflects on the suicide of Freddie Mac’s David Keller- man. Amanda Sterling tackles sexual revo- lutionary August Strindberg’s Dream Play. Face it: You have to catch a classic play at

Fringe, and this is one I’d bet on.

a classic play at Fringe, and this is one I’d bet on. MINNESOTA FRINGE FESTIVAL THRO

MINNESOTA FRINGE FESTIVAL THROUGH AUG. 9 VARIOUS VENUES IN MINNEAPOLIS AND ST. PAUL (866) 811-4111 <WWW.FRINGEFESTIVAL.ORG>

Arts & Entertainment > On the Townsend

[ by John Townsend ]

Arts & Entertainment > On the Townsend [ by John Townsend ]

July 31–August 13, 2009

Townsend [ by John Townsend ] July 31–August 13, 2009 THE BALLET RUSSES 10 0 YEAR

THE BALLET RUSSES 100 YEAR FESTIVAL / AUG. 7-8 / O’SHAUGHNESSY AUDITORIUM, COLLEGE OF ST. CATHERINE, 2004 RANDOLPH AVE., ST. PAUL / (612) 673-0404 / <WWW.METROBALLET.ORG>

ST. PAUL / (612) 673-0404 / <WWW.METROBALLET.ORG> Nina Novak . Photo Courtesy of The Ballet Russes

Nina Novak. Photo Courtesy of The Ballet Russes 100 Year Festival

Renowned Prima Ballerina Nina Novak hosts Metropolitan Ballet and Kenwood Symphony’s centenary tribute to penul- timate gay dance figure Sergei Diaghilev, founder of The Ballets Russes. In less than three years, Metro Ballet already has be- come a treasure for revitalizing dance work reflecting such gay composers as Aaron Co- pland and Tchaikovsky from a sumptuously classical perspective. And Kenwood’s musi- cians are first-rate. Metro Ballet Founding Artistic Director Erik Sanborn says, “Diaghhilev’s passion for the art of dance blurred with his passion for Nijinski himself. The two men were lovers for many years, and what was born of their tumultuous relationship changed the course of performing art history forever. I am particularly enthralled with what went on in those early years of The Ballets Russ- es, as I have personally been the catalyst for a new organization combining talents of local and international artisans. I feel as though in some small way that I am con- necting with these great genius minds of the era that moved a society forward. Every patron and artist interested in dance and music for dance needs to see works such as these to appreciate the heritage our current world of movement art is based upon.”

heritage our current world of movement art is based upon.” When a Man Loves a Diva

When a Man Loves a Diva. Photo by Stephen Voegeli

WHEN A MAN LOVES A DIVA / THROUGH AUG. 16 / LAB THEATER, 700 N. 1ST ST., MPLS. / (612) 333-7977 / <WWW.THELABTHEATER.ORG>

Men singing songs composed for women may sound like grist for the gay stereotype mill, but when done as vulnerably, wittily, and effervescently as in this show, it be- comes truly universal, whatever your sexual orientation. The always-hip Sanford Moore directs the music of the newly remounted revue you can take your queer buddies to, as well as your grandparents. Beloved singer/actor Dane Stauffer shares, “There are certainly men who sing about vulnerable emotions like Smokey Robinson, but there’s a certain range of songs that seem to be the woman’s domain, from ‘I’m Nothing Without You’ to ‘I Will Survive.’ She is triumphing over those emotions that invite us to despair. I think that’s why Divas is so popular with GLBT folks. Gays, lesbians, and women in general share the status of being ‘outside the main- stream’ in so many ways that when a ‘diva’ gets up on a stage, and sings the shit out of some pop anthem, she is triumphing over the pain of separation. She is standing up to the ‘powers that be,’ and saying, ‘I matter! I

count!’ She is making something of herself in the arena of power. Watching a woman empower herself in performance is liberat- ing to the audience as well.”

IS THERE A DOCTOR IN THE HOUSE? / THROUGH AUG. 29 / MINNESOTA CENTENNIAL SHOWBOAT, HARRIET ISLAND, ST. PAUL / (651) 227-1100 / <WWW.SHOWBOAT.UMN.EDU>

ST. PAUL / (651) 227-1100 / <WWW.SHOWBOAT.UMN.EDU> Is There a Doctor in the House? Photo by

Is There a Doctor in the House? Photo by Cody Baldwin

The gleefully glorious Is There a Doctor in the House? is the freshest and funniest sum- mer Showboat offering in years. Kenneth Noel Mitchell’s inspired, free-wheeling ad- aptation of The Imaginary Invalid may not jive with original playwright Molière’s sav- age take on religious hypocrisy, but it cer-

tainly thrusts lots of juicy digs on neocon- led resistance to public option health care. Mitchell, who is also the director, rel- ishes a flourishingly excessive style that brazenly overdoes French accents, and sends up sexual rebelliousness in spades— like Anna Hickey’s sinister dominatrix Nurse Fannay, costumed naughtily by Ja- son Lee Resler. Two extraordinary young comic tal- ents to watch out for: Skyler Nowinski’s deliriously hypochondriacal Argan, as well as Noah Putterman’s Cleante and Emcee, seem to spring from the mystical vapors where the spirits of Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin frolic. Along with Hickey and Elizabeth Griffin’s magnificently savvy Toinette, I swear, this show dazzles with some of the most luminous young talent to tread local boards in years. Denise Prosek’s music direction bounces with Moulin Rouge vitality, though some vocals could be fuller and broader. Sari Ketter’s movement consulting also breathes buoyant zest into this outra- geously wonderful production.

THE BRAVE NEW WORKSHOP SAVES THE PLAN- ET; OR YES WE CAN, BUT DO WE HAVE TO? / THROUGH OCT. 31 / BRAVE NEW WORKSHOP, 2605 HENNEPIN AVE., MPLS. / (612) 332-6620 / <WWW.BRAVENEWWORKSHOP.COM>

This vibrantly performed collabora- tion illuminates how current geopolitical madness wears and tears on average folks. An Old MacDonald’s Farm kiddie sing- along is thwarted by fears of swine and bird flu. Global terror is spoofed, as slick Kim Jong-Il (Josh Eakright) constantly mispro- nounces the name of his harried partner in crime, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (Joe Bozic). A weirdly hilarious segment involves heteroeroticim, homoeroticism, and bes- tialeroticism, with Eakright looking hot in body tights as an oil-drenched seal. Also oddly sexy is Ellie Hino as Megan Fox with a Barbie-filled uterus. Poor Bobby Gardner is left holding the bag with three grotesque stereotypes:

Asian tyrant, gay femme, and homely mid- dle-aged virgin. The fab Lauren Anderson fares better as a gal who sees Jews as the center of all ills. The problem with not putting such figures in a bigger context is that they flirt with the Michael Savage school of psychocomedy. That said, with a smart cowriter or dramaturg—like, say, Kenneth Noel Mitchell or Ben McGovern—direc- tor Caleb McEwen could explore and flesh

these figures out more adventurously.

McGovern—direc- tor Caleb McEwen could explore and flesh these figures out more adventurously. LavenderMagazine.com 39
McGovern—direc- tor Caleb McEwen could explore and flesh these figures out more adventurously. LavenderMagazine.com 39
LavenderMagazine.com
LavenderMagazine.com

Arts & Entertainment > On the Record

[ by Ed Huyck ]

Arts & Entertainment > On the Record [ by Ed Huyck ]

July 31–August 13, 2009

On the Record [ by Ed Huyck ] July 31–August 13, 2009 Art Brut vs. Satan
On the Record [ by Ed Huyck ] July 31–August 13, 2009 Art Brut vs. Satan

Art Brut vs. Satan

ART BRUT

] July 31–August 13, 2009 Art Brut vs. Satan ART BRUT Sometimes, it’s worth waiting before

Sometimes, it’s worth waiting before forming an opinion. While this album has been lurking on my hard drive for

a couple of months, I really

didn’t give it a listen until

a couple of the tracks bore

their way into my brain via repeated airings on the radio. The band’s ragged postpunk sound has been done by many groups in recent years, but it’s Eddie Argos’s lyrics that

really seal the deal. He’s a wry commentator on everyday life—a more shouty end of a long-standing British tradi- tion. Art Brut also celebrates some distinctly geeky joys. As someone who has haunted used music stores for decades,

I absolutely understand the

pleasures detailed in “The Replacements,” where the singer is amazed finally to hear the signature Minneapo- lis band after finding a disc in

a secondhand shop. And “DC

Comics and Chocolate Milk” could have been drawn from my own youth, as I always preferred the second-place superheroes.

Dirty King

THE CLIKS

preferred the second-place superheroes. Dirty King THE CLIKS While this band may get attention for postop

While this band may get attention for postop trans- sexual leader Lucas Silveira (pictured shirtless on the

cover—if you look closely, you can see the scars), rock

music fans should give it a whirl for The Cliks’s tough and impassioned playing. Silveira—who sounds an aw- ful lot like Gwen Stefani— reaches into the rock play- book for a collection of tunes about betrayal and lost love. From the opening “Haunt- ed,” it’s clear that the trio has a tough ride in store for the listener, as the singer leaves behind a faithful love for the unknown. Silveira makes it all clear on “Not Your Boy”:

“The only thing inside I can see/Is in the lie that tells me I’ve been dreaming.” Ouch. And it doesn’t get any easier on the back half of the record, where the band runs

through “Career Suicide”; “We Are the Wolverines”; and the closer, “Animal Farm.” Dirty King leaves you spent, exhausted, and ready to listen again.

leaves you spent, exhausted, and ready to listen again. Greatest Hits FRITZ HELDER AND THE PHANTOMS

Greatest Hits

FRITZ HELDER AND THE PHANTOMS

to listen again. Greatest Hits FRITZ HELDER AND THE PHANTOMS Cheeky title aside, this Canadian combo

Cheeky title aside, this Canadian combo does a fine job in bringing the goods. The quartet obvi- ously loves to party and make people dance (e.g., “Making a Scene” and “All

Over the Place”). Later on, things settle down to the nitty-gritty, such as the cold techno of “Sex Robot” and the driving punk of “Punch Me in the Neck.” It has plenty of camp—one of the players is holding a keytar, for heaven’s sake—but also

a lot of deep love for the

varied musical styles, from

straight-up disco to electro- funk to more obscure sounds. Some hitches creep in along the way. The album has far too many interludes that do little more than just interrupt the fun, and

it ends with a couple of

remixes that do little more than pad out the album length. In between all that, however, is a core of tunes that will do plenty to pack any stylish dance floor.

tunes that will do plenty to pack any stylish dance floor. Songs for Sorrow MIKA Mika

Songs for Sorrow

MIKA

to pack any stylish dance floor. Songs for Sorrow MIKA Mika follows up Life in Cartoon

Mika follows up Life in Cartoon Motion with this delightful confection of an EP. The minialbum seemed to have been a lost art, but the ascendancy of digital distribution gives artists a

reason to put out a handful of tracks at a time. This not only keeps them in the pub- lic eye, but also takes some pressure off having to craft

a dozen or more new songs

at a time. Per the title, Songs for Sorrow is a slightly darker set than Cartoon Motion, but

the singer’s skills are still in full effect. In fact, he moves

a bit out of the Freddie

Mercury shadow this time

around, and begins to forge

a more distinct identity.

Sure, it the jolly “Toy Boy”

is there, but that’s just a

counterpoint to the rest of

the set, especially “Lady Jane,” which moves Mika more into Rufus Wain- wright territory. No matter the influence, it’s worth a listen—and you can hear three/fourths of it at <www.

mikasounds.com>.

influence, it’s worth a liste n—and you can he ar three /f ourt h s o
LavenderMagazine.com 41
LavenderMagazine.com 41
LavenderMagazine.com
LavenderMagazine.com

July 31–August 13, 2009

Bar Advertiser Guide > Twin Cities

08 12 05 11 06 02 03 09 01 13 07 10 04 19 BAR
08
12
05
11
06
02 03 09
01
13
07 10
04
19 BAR
01
GLADIUS
06
10
213
E. 4th St., St. Paul, (651) 225-GLBT
19 W. 15th St., Mpls. (612) 871-5553
Shoot pool or play darts at your neighbor-
hood bar—the Twin Cities’s oldest GLBT
establishment.
1111 Hennepin Ave., Mpls.
Opening Soon. The New York Chic of Min-
neapolis.
<www.rumours-stpaul.com>
Newest, hottest dance club with fabulous
DJs, plus shows featuring the best local
talent.
BOLT
07
INNUENDO
SALOON
513
Washington Ave. S., Mpls.
213
E. 4th St., St. Paul,
02
(612) 338-0896
<www.boltbar.com>
Best video bar in Twin Cities. Huge selec-
tion of music/comedy video clips & Show
Tune Sundays. Best patio in town.
11
830
Hennepin Ave., Mpls.
(651) 225-GLBT
<www.rumours-stpaul.com>
Casual, intimate “Cheers” ambience for
quiet conversation, Happy Hour, and com-
munity organization shows and fund-raisers.
(612) 332-0835
<www.gaympls.com>
Long regarded as Minneapolis’s cutting-edge
dance club, with friendly staff and discern-
ing customers.
BOLT UNDERGROUND
TICKLES
03
08
LUSH FOOD BAR
501
Washington Ave. S., Mpls.
12
1032
3rd Ave NE., Mpls.
990
Central Ave NE, Mpls.
(612) 338-0896
<www.boltbar.com/underground>
Industrial & carnal nightclub hidden
beneath the city. Join us for CHAMBER
every Thursday night.
<www.lushfoodbar.com>
Video Bar, Eclectic Live Entertainment,
Mixing Artists. Eat. Drink. Be LUSHious.
(612) 354-3846
<www.ticklesbar.com>
Live Piano Music, Full Service Menu,
Happy Hour, Sports on 4 Flat Panel TVs,
Pool, Darts
04
CAMP
MINNEAPOLIS EAGLE
TOWN HOUSE
26th Ave. S.
490
N. Robert St., St. Paul
09
515
Washington Ave. S., Mpls.
1415
University Ave. W., St. Paul
Central Ave. NE
13
(651) 292-1844
<www.camp-bar.net>
An upscale but casual spot with great video,
dancing, cabaret, and the friendliest staff in
town!
(612) 338-4214
<www.minneapoliseagle.com>
Gay-owned & -operated for 10 years.
Home of famous Friday 3-for-1 Happy
Hour & Sunday afternoon Beer Bust.
(651) 646-7087
<www.townhousebar.com>
Fun neighborhood bar with a great mix of
men and women. Visit our piano lounge.
05
GAY 90’S
RUMOURS
408
Hennepin Ave., Mpls.
w
(612) 333-7755
<www.gay90s.com>
Upper Midwest’s Largest Gay Entertainment
Complex. Six bars: Main Bar, Happy Hour,
Dance Annex, Men’s Room, La Femme, Retro.
e
N
e
h
T

> Regional

IA
IA

The Blazing Saddle, Des Moines

WI
WI

Scooter’s, Eau Claire

416

E. 5th St., (515) 246-1299

411

Galloway St., (715) 835-9959

Buddy’s Corral, Des Moines

My Place, La Crosse

418

E. 5th St., (515) 244-7140

3201

S. Ave., (608) 788-9073

The Garden, Des Moines

Players, La Crosse

112

SE 4th, (515) 243-3965

 

218

Main St., (608) 784-2353

Kings & Queens Tap, Waterloo

Chances R, La Crosse

304

W. 4th St., (319) 232-3001

417

Jay St., (608) 782-5101

Rio Video/Patio Bar, Des Moines

The Flame, Superior

1500 SE 1st., (515) 288-0382

1612

Tower Ave., (715) 395-0101

J.T.’s, Superior

1506

N. 3rd St., (715) 394-2580

The Main Club, Superior

1217

Tower Ave., (715) 392-1756

SD
SD

David, Sioux Falls 214 W. 10th St., (605) 274-0700

Bar Scene > Bartender Spotlight

[ by George Holdgrafer ]

Bar Scene > Bartender Spotlight [ by George Holdgrafer ]
TROVER
TROVER

WHO

Trover

Spotlight [ by George Holdgrafer ] TROVER WHO Trover WHAT Recipe: Raspberry Truffl e Martini 1

WHAT

Recipe: Raspberry Truffle Martini

1 oz. Stoli Vanil

1 oz. Chambord Black Raspberry Liqueur

1 oz. Bailey’s Irish Cream Liqueur

1 /2 oz. Kahlúa Liqueur

WHEN

Sun. • 7 PM-Midnight

WHERE

Town House 1415 University Ave. W., St. Paul (651) 646-7087 <www.townhousebar.com>

WHY

“Premier Entertainment hosts the best karaoke Sunday through Tuesday. You couldn’t find better regular customers and fun staff than at the Town House.”

July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009

Bar Scene > Leather Life

[ by Steve Lenius ]

Bar Scene > Leather Life [ by Steve Lenius ]

A Masseur Tells All

Massage and bodywork can be—pardon the pun—touchy subjects. Considering the hang-ups, expectations, and fantasies many people in our society have about touch and nudity, communication between massage therapist and client (or prospective client) can be fraught with mixed messages, subliminal contexts, and speaking in code that may or may not be understood by the other party. Over the years, I have read many books on massage, but until now, I never encoun- tered one that approaches the topic from the angle taken by author R.D. Cain in Do You Work in the Nude? Confessions of a Masseur & Bodyworker. He discusses his profession in a charming, disarmingly honest, and straight- forward manner that tries to cut through un- easiness, embarrassment, and taboos. Cain has been a massage and bodywork therapist since 1991. With that many years of experience, he has built up a supply of entertaining stories and practical advice that

will be interesting to anyone who either does massage/bodywork professionally or who enjoys the services of someone who does. This is a fun, breezy confection of a book. Cain covers many facets of massage and bodywork, starting, as all good writers do, with a definition of terms. He then de- scribes how he got into the business, and how he developed his practice over the years. He delineates the many different schools of massage and bodywork (accord- ing to him, more 80 at last count). Cain shares advice and philosophy on advertising and running a massage busi- ness. As a way of illustrating massage and bodywork etiquette, he describes his favor- ite (and least favorite) client types. The book ends with a few quotes from notable people on the subject of massage. Adding to the fun are witty, and sometimes snarky, illustrations by Revo Yanson and Ethan Young.

If you are a massage therapist or body- worker, you will enjoy reading a compatriot’s thoughts. If you are considering becoming a massage therapist or bodyworker, this book offers pointers on what to do, as well as some warnings about pitfalls along the way. If, on the other hand, you are a client look- ing for a massage or bodywork professional, this book will tell you what (and what not) to do, along with what questions to ask (and not ask). Working with a massage professional is like any other professional relationship: You’ll get better results if you act appropriately. If you already have a favorite massage professional, buy him or her a copy. It will

make his or her day.

buy him or her a copy. It will make his or her day. DO YOU WORK

DO YOU WORK IN THE NUDE? CONFESSIONS OF A MASSEUR & BODYWORKER R.D. CAIN THIRD MILLENNIUM PUBLISHING, TEMPE, AZ

<WWW.3MPUB.COM>

July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009
LavenderMagazine.com
LavenderMagazine.com

> Bar Scene

[ by George Holdgrafer ]

> B a r S c e n e [ by George Holdgrafer ]

July 31–August 13, 2009

FABULOUS RENOVATION OF HAPPY HOUR AT GAY 90’S IS COMPLETE

Oldest Part of Megabar Is Now the Newest

1960 Frescoes by Marvin Anderson. Photos Courtesy of Gay 90's
1960 Frescoes by
Marvin Anderson.
Photos Courtesy of Gay 90's

Before. Photo Courtesy of Gay 90's

After. Photo by George Holdgrafer

T he Happy Hour bar, which debuted

in 1957, is the oldest part of the Gay

90’s megabar. Now, with the comple-

tion of a fabulous renovation of the 52-year-old establishment, it’s really the newest space—the first phase of a complete remodeling of the en- tire Hennepin Avenue landmark. Gone is the former drab look, and a chic

new ambience prevails at the Happy Hour. Attractive stone work and cherrywood pan- eling line the walls. The unsightly clutter of yesteryear has given way to a rustic cop- per high ceiling that makes the room much more capacious. State-of-the-art LED light- ing lends a warm glow. Enhancing the decor

is custom-designed carpeting. A spectacular video/satellite and sound system, with 10 large HD display screens, provides endless entertainment to customers. Cushioned swiv- el bar stools are the ultimate in comfort. In a nod to the past, the two stained glass windows at the Hennepin Avenue en- trance remain in the redesign, but they’ve been cleansed of a half-century of grime. The construction process, from mid- May to early July, took on the dimension of an archeological excavation. It uncov- ered the quaint frescoes created by Marvin Anderson in 1960, just three years after the Happy Hour opened. A renowned artist

who died in 1989, he took particular pride in his restoration of the ceiling at the Swed- ish-American Institute in Minneapolis, among a bevy of other local achievements. At the renovated Happy Hour, patrons have a marvelous spot to meet friends and enjoy delicious beverages served by friend- ly bartenders. It’s open the longest hours of any Twin Cities GLBT bar: Monday through Saturday, 8 AM-2 AM, and Sun- day, 11 AM-2 AM. Watch for the start of the next phase of the Gay 90’s remodeling—on the second

floor.

and Sun- day, 11 AM-2 AM. Watch for the start of the next phase of the
LavenderMagazine.com 49
LavenderMagazine.com
LavenderMagazine.com

> Bar Scene

[ by George Holdgrafer ]

> B a r S c e n e [ by George Holdgrafer ]

Imperial Court of Minnesota Coronation XVIII

Organization Heads in New Direction

Although it’s primarily a fund-raising or- ganization bringing in thousands of dollars annually for local charities, the Imperial Court of Minnesota (ICOM), founded in 1992, does so by hosting fun events, mainly drag shows with plenty of crowns and gowns. On August 15, ICOM is mounting its grandest spectacle of the year, Coronation XVIII, with the theme “A Wild Journey under the Egyptian Sky: Exploring the Temples of Celestial Beings.” That night, Empress XVII, Billie La Tease Austin, and Regent Emperor XVII, Darin Hatch, will step down after a very successful reign. For the first time in ICOM history, no monarchs actually will be crowned at Cor- onation XVIII. Rather, the organization is planning to spend the next year revitalizing itself. Instead of new monarchs taking the lead, as in the past, the entire membership, especially past monarchs, will guide ICOM.

But fund-raising for local groups will take place as usual.

CORONATION XVIII CALENDAR

SAT., AUG. 8

AWARDS & IN TOWN SHOW

9 PM-MIDNIGHT

INNUENDO

213 E. 4TH ST., ST. PAUL

THU., AUG. 13

FAMILY SHOW

9 PM-MIDNIGHT

INNUENDO

213 E. 4TH ST., ST. PAUL

FRI., AUG. 14

OUT OF TOWN SHOW 6-9 PM

HILTON GARDEN INN

411 MINNESOTA ST., ST. PAUL

BUS TOUR BOARDS 9:30 PM HILTON GARDEN INN

411 MINNESOTA ST., ST. PAUL

SAT., AUG. 15

CORONATION XVIII

DOORS OPEN AT 6 PM STARTS AT 7 PM HILTON GARDEN INN

411 MINNESOTA ST., ST. PAUL

SUN., AUG. 16

VICTORY GATHERING 10 PM-1 AM

HILTON GARDEN INN

411 MINNESOTA ST., ST. PAUL

10 PM-1 AM HILTON GARDEN INN 411 MINNESOTA ST., ST. PAUL Emperor XVII, Darin Hatch (left),
10 PM-1 AM HILTON GARDEN INN 411 MINNESOTA ST., ST. PAUL Emperor XVII, Darin Hatch (left),

Emperor XVII, Darin Hatch (left), and Empress XVII, Billie La Tease Austin. Photo by Paul Nixdorf

July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009
XVII, Billie La Tease Austin . P h o t o b y P a u
LavenderMagazine.com 51
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LavenderMagazine.com
July 31–August 13, 2009 Bar Scene > Bar Calendar For club addresses, phone num bers,
July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009

Bar Scene > Bar Calendar

July 31–August 13, 2009 Bar Scene > Bar Calendar For club addresses, phone num bers, and

For club addresses, phone numbers, and Web sites, see “Twin Cities Lavender Bar Advertiser Guide” and “Regional Bar Guide” on page 42. For other events, see <LavenderMagazine. com/calendar>.

other events, see <LavenderMagazine. com/calendar>. FRIDAY, JULY 31 Hips ’N Lips Drag Show 9 PM. Rumours.
other events, see <LavenderMagazine. com/calendar>. FRIDAY, JULY 31 Hips ’N Lips Drag Show 9 PM. Rumours.

FRIDAY, JULY 31

Hips ’N Lips Drag Show

9 PM. Rumours.

Circus Party: Cast & Crew of Cirque du Soleil’s KOOZA 11 PM. Rumours.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1

Ball Busters Softball Team Fund-raiser

6 PM. Saloon.

Carlita Santiago’s

All Out Birthday Party Show

7 PM. Innuendo.

Lip Service

9 PM. Town House.

Underwear Party

Bolt Underground

THURSDAY, AUGUST 6 Bingo-Palooza

Benefits The Aliveness Project

8 PM. Bolt.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 8

Minnesota Storm Patrol Night

5 PM. Minneapolis Eagle.

Imperial Court of Minnesota Awards & In Town Show

9 PM-Midnight. Innuendo. TNT Show

9 PM. Town House.

Leather Dress Code Night Bolt Underground

MONDAY, AUGUST 10 Harder Monday:

Fetish Night

Saloon

THURSDAY, AUGUST 13 Family Show

9 PM-Midnight. Innuendo.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14

Minneapolis Movie Bears Bar Night

7 PM. Rumours.

Total DiscTraction 9 PM. Town House

SATURDAY, AUGUST 15 Golf Tourney Saloon Booby Trap Bolt Underground

SUNDAY, AUGUST 16

Singles Pool Tournament

4 PM. 19 Bar.

ONGOING

MONDAYS

Biz-R-Bingo

9 PM. Innuendo.

Karaoke with Dana

9 PM. Town House.

Men’s Night: Male Dancers 9:30 PM. Town House. Karaoke with Killer B’s

10 PM. Gay 90’s.

Hard Monday

Saloon

TUESDAYS Mega Bingo Benefits MS Society 6:30 PM. Gay 90’s. Team Trivia

7:30 PM. Innuendo. Idol Karaoke

9 PM. Bolt.

Karaoke with Killer B’s

9 PM. Saloon.

Karaoke with John

9 PM. Town House.

Diamond Diva Drag Show

10 PM. Gay 90’s.

Fiesta Latina

10 PM. Saloon.

WEDNESDAYS Bango with Mother Pearl

Benefits The Aliveness Project 5:30 PM. Saloon. Debbie Duncan

8 PM. Camp.

Encounter: Male Dancers

9 PM. Innuendo.

Project 5:30 PM. Saloon. Debbie Duncan 8 PM. Camp. Encounter: Male Dancers 9 PM. Innuendo. LavenderMagazine.com
LavenderMagazine.com
LavenderMagazine.com
July 31–August 13, 2009 [Bar Calendar] Drag Show 9:30 PM. La Femme Show Lounge. Gay
July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009

[Bar Calendar]

Drag Show 9:30 PM. La Femme Show Lounge. Gay 90’s. Hump Night Saloon

THURSDAYS Trivia with Carl Saloon Mega Bingo Benefits MS Society 6:30 PM. Gay 90’s. Progressive Bingo

Benefits The Aliveness Project

8 PM. Bolt.

Chamber

9 PM. Bolt Underground.

The Girls (1st Thu.) or Lori Dokken & Guest

9 PM. Town House. Drag Show

9:30 PM. La Femme Show Lounge. Gay 90’s. Pumps and Pearls Drag Revue

10 PM. Town House.

Karaoke with John

9 PM. Innuendo.

Boys Night Out Saloon

FRIDAYS

Erin Schwab

6 PM. Camp.

Red Carpet with Candi Stratton

9:30 PM. La Femme Show Lounge. Gay 90’s. Male Dancers

10 PM. Gay 90’s.

Mineshaft Bolt Underground Wet! Male Dancers Saloon

SATURDAYS

Drag Show

9:30 PM. La Femme Show Lounge. Gay 90’s. Male Dancers

10 PM. Innuendo/Rumours

Male Dancers

10 PM. Gay 90’s.

SUNDAYS

Showtunes

5 PM. Bolt.

Karaoke with John & Trover

7 PM. Lounge. Town House. Mia Dorr

8 PM. Camp.

Karaoke with Jamie & Jeremy

9 PM. Innuendo.

Pumps and Pearls Drag Revue

9 PM. Town House.

Drag Show 9:30 PM. La Femme Show Lounge. Gay 90’s. Amateur Shower Contest

11 PM. Saloon.

Lounge. Gay 90’s. Amateur Shower Contest 11 PM. Saloon. Check out our online “Bar Advertiser Guide”

Check out our online “Bar Advertiser Guide” Web links at <www.lavendermagazine.com>.

LavenderMagazine.com
LavenderMagazine.com
July 31–August 13, 2009 Regional Pride Preview | [ by George Holdgrafer ] Chippewa Valley
July 31–August 13, 2009 Regional Pride Preview | [ by George Holdgrafer ] Chippewa Valley
July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009

Regional Pride Preview |

July 31–August 13, 2009 Regional Pride Preview | [ by George Holdgrafer ] Chippewa Valley Pride

[ by George Holdgrafer ]

Chippewa Valley Pride

Eau Claire Is Closest Gay Getaway from Twin Cities

This year, the LGBT Community Center of the Chippewa Valley, in con- junction with Scooter’s bar, is hosting Chippewa Valley Pride on August 14-16 in Eau Claire, Wisconsin—75 miles from the Twin Cities, an easy hour-and-a-half drive on I-94.

FRI., AUG. 14

Open House 7-10 PM LGBT Community Center

of the Chippewa Valley

510 Farwell St., Eau Claire, WI

Adonis Midwest Male Dancers 10:30 PM Scooter’s

411 Galloway St., Eau Claire, WI

SAT., AUG. 15

Chippewa Valley Pride Picnic 11 AM-5 PM Riverview Island, Eau Claire, WI

Movie Marathon 6:30 PM LGBT Community Center

of the Chippewa Valley

510 Farwell St., Eau Claire, WI

Pride Drag Show 10:30 PM Scooter’s

411 Galloway St., Eau Claire, WI

SUN., AUG. 16

Ice Cream Social & Pontoon Boat Ride Benefits LGBT Community Center of the Chippewa Valley Chippewa River, Eau Claire, WI Call (715) 552-GLBT (4528) for Details & Reservations

Pride Karaoke with Sarge 9 PM Scooter’s

411 Galloway St., Eau Claire, WI

(4528) for Details & Reservations Pride Karaoke with Sarge 9 PM Scooter’s 411 Galloway St., Eau

[ by Heidi Fellner ]

Cuisine > Off the Eaten Path

July 31–August 13, 2009

[ by Heidi Fellner ] Cuisine > Off the Eaten Path July 31–August 13, 2009 58

what

elegant

tin

Perhaps the world’s oldest cocktail, its recipe has changed little since the 1840s. I found it an especially fitting choice, consider- ing The Sample Room’s first incarnation. Built in the

graph-

sample kegs.

($8.50).

in a light

concept.

for restored

ceiling and handsome wood paneling. Anywhere

Hubert Bonnet

trend—is

Photos by tossed

’60s-style

its

Sazerac

plate

and oil. eggplant,

could

fully

market

me

small

with

where one

the the did establishment’s complete

ordering

not prepare

and basil

restaurant’s

mushrooms,

not current

tomatoes

it housed a tavern

resist

roma peas,

interior,

1800s, history—and

with snow

couldn’t

inspired

signage

oven-dried

However,

Victorian

Gnocchi

actually

and

Squash with

I

This

but

Hill Goat Cheese

ics

Stickney Butternut

to go. howls of jealousy

However, my last few forays into epicurean territory have been…well, no

all, in The Sample Room’s own tagline. I was treat- ed to sips of my friend’s festive French 75 ($8.50),

I had heard good things about The Sample Room, but quite frankly, the re-

high-

Yes,

yes,

home.

Baked mustard;

at me. of

right And,

surprised

combination

and country

tapas.

onions, sprouts;

feel

of

daikon radish

elicited

my list

a Minneapolitan

version

caramelized

next quirky

more eager

glaze and

on

the column

hot kraut,

it Lutheran’s

easy—a

a miso

with with

was

it made me of all this

served

makes

beer, Tuna

too

a

friends

Seared in Rare

is almost

alongside

announcement

after

cocktails

that

deglazed

drizzle;

a few first,

my

thing

seared and

concept

of told

with balsamic

are featured

cuisine,

adults,

partner and I sampled

Bratwurst,

I

kind

I got the when

So, when

Asparagus

restaurant’s

potatoes. mature

low-brow

Housemade

our evening—they

just

Roasted

small otherwise

sauce; left)

action

that’s

(Clockwise from upper

and

the

My dining

eggplant-tomato

to start

LavenderMagazine.com LavenderMagazine.com

from

r o m u p p e r and the My dining eggplant-tomato to start LavenderMagazine.com

59

59

July 31–August 13, 2009

July 31–August 13, 2009 IT’S A FROM-SCRATCH PLACE, AND THE SHEER VARIETY OF THE SMALL PLATE

IT’S A FROM-SCRATCH PLACE, AND THE SHEER VARIETY OF THE SMALL PLATE LIST IS DIZZYING. THE THOUGHT OF THE INCREDIBLE AMOUNT OF PREP WORK IS OVERWHELMING.

OF THE INCREDIBLE AMOUNT OF PREP WORK IS OVERWHELMING. else, that inconsistency might be off-put- ting,

else, that inconsistency might be off-put- ting, but The Sample Room seems to work very hard at being unpredictable.

A brief scan over the menu makes me

feel for the kitchen staff. It’s a from-scratch place, and the sheer variety of the small plate list is dizzying. The thought of the incred- ible amount of prep work is overwhelming. But I’m hungry, darn it, so after a few sec- onds, I quickly put everyone to work.

Baked Stickney Hill Goat Cheese ($6.50) arrived in a luscious bath of basil oil and oven-dried Roma tomatoes. After the cheese had—ahem—disappeared, restaura- teur Darren Ennis caught me poking a fin- ger directly into the oil, and made a good show of not judging me. One probably needs at least three small plates per person at The Sample Room to make a meal of it. Though I know I always leave an “Off the Eaten Path” restaurant stuffed to the gills, I selfishly wanted more. If you have more than two people in your party, it may be wise to double-order on the most popular item. Next was PreTenderloin ($6.50), a re- sponse to shrinking consumer budgets that grants diners the red-meat experience without a hefty price tag. The savings is partly because of the cut of meat—hence the name. It arrives perfectly medium rare, served with horseradish-mustard pepper- corn sauce atop mashed potatoes. The re- sult is right on target—a good way to satisfy a craving without the sticker shock. It was nice to see Wisconsin “Sun Fish”—petite bluegill—on the menu. This dish is accompanied by butternut squash cake and tarragon aioli that easily can over- power the fish, so diners should alternate forkfuls to enjoy both properly.

If you’re going the way of the small

plate, The Sample Room offers its equiva-

lent in intoxicants: Liquor and wine flights are both approachable and affordable.

defies wine theory, I know, but our full

glass of Calesa Fair Trade Semillon ($7.50/30) goes with just about everything on the menu— even our hearty entrée, housemade Bratwursts ($15.95). Sautéed in bacon, deglazed in beer, and served with a cheerful helping of onions and sauerkraut, it is a smash hit.

It

helping of onions and sauerkraut, it is a smash hit. It ABOVE Butternut Squash. BELOW (from
helping of onions and sauerkraut, it is a smash hit. It ABOVE Butternut Squash. BELOW (from
helping of onions and sauerkraut, it is a smash hit. It ABOVE Butternut Squash. BELOW (from

ABOVE Butternut Squash. BELOW (from left) Bar area; Bratwurst, tuna, asparagus, tomatoes, and goat cheese.

At this point, no way could I could finish both brats, and the accompanying mashed

potatoes and roasted vegetables. So, it be- came my take-home peace offering to those who could not be there in person. Would that token appease their jealousy?

Perhaps

sert, the Toffee Caramel Vanilla Cheesecake ($5.50). It takes special chutzpah to serve me cheesecake, and I was up-front about this with the server. My mother is an admitted cheesecake zealot who judges them on her version of the four C’s: consistency, color,

I didn’t tell them about des-

if

crust, and can-I-eat-the-whole-thing. I am similarly rigid—I like mine firm but creamy, and only lightly sweet. Nevertheless, the cheesecake boldly was fetched for me, and I was grateful, because it was all those things. Parking is plentiful, even if your vehicle of choice is a boat. Just dock at the back,

and come on in.

of choice is a boat. Just dock at the back, and come on in. THE S

THE SAMPLE ROOM 2124 MARSHALL ST. NE, MPLS. (612) 789-0333 <WWW.THE-SAMPLE-ROOM.COM>

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Cuisine > Nutrition

[ by Darin Schwinkendorf ]

C u i s i n e > N u t r i t i o

July 31–August 13, 2009

n [ by Darin Schwinkendorf ] July 31–August 13, 2009 FAT Friend or Foe? Healthy fats?

FAT

Friend or Foe?

Healthy fats? What is that all about? Fats are the demons in food—or wait, was it carbohydrates that are the doom- sayers? Hmm. Most of us have heard the term “fad diets,” and most of us also have succumbed to the failures of these dietary recommendations. That is, these diets are only short-term solutions to more complex underlying problems with dietary habits. Dietary fat often is given the cold shoulder in these fad diets, and many people have been led to believe that fats are the culprit for most of the world’s health problems. Well, let me introduce you to a little se- cret: Fat, in and of itself, is not so bad, and the type of fat consumed can result in dras- tically different health effects within the body. Let this be the last time I ever hear anyone talk about how a new fat-free diet is working wonders for his or her health. First of all, fat is an essential compo- nent of the human body. Adipose (i.e., fat) tissue provides insulation, and acts as the protector of all organs by maintaining body temperature and absorbing shock. It serves as a storage area for fat-soluble toxins, effectively removing them from the bloodstream to prevent acute negative health effects. Last but not least, adipose tissue synthesizes and releases many adi- pokines (i.e., hormones and hormone-like compounds) that are important for normal body functioning. Although adipose tissue plays these im- portant roles, most of us have plenty (with extra) of it to serve these functions. We just need to change its composition a bit to ob- tain most of the beneficial effects, and avoid the negatives. Different types of dietary fat affect you differently.

SATURATED/TRANS FATS

Thumbs Down Saturated fats and trans fats are mostly responsible for fat’s bad reputation over the years. Both are associated with increased

risks of just about every chronic disease, such as heart disease and cancer. Foods high in saturated fats include full-fat dairy products (milk, cheese, butter, etc.); many fatty meats (beef, pork); chocolate; and certain tropical plant oils, like coconut and palm kernel oils. Trans fats tend to be abun- dant in fried and baked goods, as well as anything containing partially hydrogenated vegetable oils in the ingredients list.

UNSATURATED FATS

Thumbs Up In general, unsaturated fats, including both monounsaturated and polyunsatu- rated varieties, are healthier than saturated and trans fats. In fact, many unsaturated fats have been associated with improved blood lipid and cholesterol levels, effectively re- ducing the risk of heart disease and other chronic diseases. Foods rich in unsaturated fats include many types of plant oils, nuts/ seeds, and avocados.

OMEGA-3 FATS

Three Thumbs Up Omega-3 fats, specific types of polyun- saturated fats, are nutritional powerhouses. They aid in reducing inflammation (asso- ciated with many chronic diseases). They are thought to help reduce the risk of many types of health complications, such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and arthritis. Omega-3 fats also aid in brain and immune functioning. They are rich in fatty fish (salmon, tuna, etc.) and fish oils, flax seeds, walnuts, and meats/animal products from grass-fed animals. Shoot for more omega-3 fats in your diet on a daily (preferably) or weekly basis.

CONJUGATED LINOLEIC ACID

Two Thumbs Up Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) is ac- tually a trans fat. However, its effects on health are very different from other trans fats. CLA is still under active research, but it appears to reduce visceral adiposity (the bad stuff surrounding your abdominal organs), and promote lean tissue growth, such as muscle. In addition, it has been as- sociated with potent antioxidant properties, and may help ward off cancer. CLA can be found mainly in grass-fed animal products like meat, eggs, and dairy.

Several years of education led me to the conclusion of everything in moderation— for the most part, you never can go wrong with that. I am convinced that broccoli would give you cancer if you ate enough of it. Just because a fat is deemed unhealthy does not mean it should be removed com- pletely from the diet, nor just because a fat is considered a dietary savior should it be eaten in excess. Moderation is key. A balanced diet with a variety of healthy fat sources (grass-fed animal products, fish, nuts/seeds, nut/seed butters, avocados, olive oil) and limited saturated/trans fat sources (non-grass-fed animal products, fried foods, baked goods, chocolate) is per- fect regardless of your weight and/or health goals. Don’t forget that dietary fat is need- ed to absorb those all-important fat-soluble vitamins (vitamins D, E, K, and A). Your body needs dietary fat to function effectively. You certainly would be bet- ter off if you selected more beneficial fats, which the body is able to put to good use—

improving your health.

bet- ter off if you selected more beneficial fats, which the body is able to put

Dining Guide Listing |

Dining Guide Listing | AVERAGE PRICE OF A TYPICAL ENTREE $ LESS THAN $15, $$ $15-$25,

AVERAGE PRICE OF A TYPICAL ENTREE $ LESS THAN $15, $$ $15-$25, $$$ MORE THAN $25

Our Guide to the Metro Eateries Featured in This Issue Lavender Magazine’s Dining Guide is your resource to GLBT-friendly restaurants. We rec- ommend calling restaurants before visiting to confirm information. All bars, restaurants and private clubs have been smoke-free since Minnesota became the 20th state to pass a statewide smoke-free law on Oc- tober 1, 2007. However, many restaurants may have a designated outdoor area for smoking. Lavenders cuisine section and updated dining guide appears each issue. Please direct ques- tions about the directory and cuisine advertising to dining@lavendermagazine.com.

and cuisine advertising to dining@lavendermagazine.com. BAD WAITRESS DINER & COFFEESHOP $ American Casual/Diner

BAD WAITRESS DINER & COFFEESHOP $

American Casual/Diner

A retro-themed diner, all-day food; coffee, free wi-fi.

All-day Breakfast & Lunch, Late-Night 2 E. 26 th St., Minneapolis 55401 (612) 872-7575 Mon – Sat: 7 AM – Midnight • Sun: 7 AM – 11 PM

BOCA CHICA RESTAURANT $

Mexican

Family owned restaurant, made from scratch, lovely murals on the wall; authentic. Lunch, Dinner

11 Cesar Chavez St., St. Paul

Sun – Thurs: 11 AM – 10 PM • Fri – Sat: 11 AM – 11 PM

DANCING GANESHA $$

Contemporary Indian

We would like you to come & enjoy our novel Indian cuisines in an extraordinary ambiance. Lunch, Dinner

1100 Harmon Pl., Minneapolis (612) 388-1877

Mon – Sat: 11 AM – 2 PM, 4 PM – 10:30 PM • Sun: 11

AM – 2 PM, 5 PM – 9 PM

ELSIE’S $

American

New banquet room and cozy bar for private parties. Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner

729 Marshall St. NE, Minneapolis (612) 378-9701

Mon – Thurs: 6 AM – 11 PM • Fri: 6 AM – 12 AM

• Sat:

8 AM – 12 AM • Sun:

8 AM – 11 PM

IT’S GREEK TO ME $

Greek

Family-owned & run for over 25 years, we’ve treated generations of diners to our authentic menu & warm Greek hospitality. Dinner only weekdays, Lunch & Dinner on weekends

626 W. Lake St., Minneapolis (612) 825-9922

Tues – Fri: 4:30 PM – 11 PM • Sat: 11 AM – 11 PM

• Sun:

11 AM – 10 PM

KINDEE THAI $

Thai

This isn’t your traditional everyday Thai restaurant. Lunch, Dinner

719 S. 2 nd St., Minneapolis (612) 465-8303

Mon: Closed • Tues – Thurs: 11:30 AM – 9 PM • Fri:

11:30 AM – 10:30 PM • Sat: 11 AM – 10:30 PM • Sun:

11 AM – 9 PM

MIDORI’S FLOATING WORLD CAFÉ $

Sushi, Tempuru

Sushi, tempura, noodles, traditional, contemporary, home-styled specials, beer, wine, sake. Lunch, Dinner

3011 27 th Ave. S., Minneapolis (612) 721-3011

specials, beer, wine, sake. Lunch, Dinner 3011 27 t h Ave. S., Minneapolis (612) 721-3011 LavenderMagazine.com
specials, beer, wine, sake. Lunch, Dinner 3011 27 t h Ave. S., Minneapolis (612) 721-3011 LavenderMagazine.com
specials, beer, wine, sake. Lunch, Dinner 3011 27 t h Ave. S., Minneapolis (612) 721-3011 LavenderMagazine.com
specials, beer, wine, sake. Lunch, Dinner 3011 27 t h Ave. S., Minneapolis (612) 721-3011 LavenderMagazine.com
specials, beer, wine, sake. Lunch, Dinner 3011 27 t h Ave. S., Minneapolis (612) 721-3011 LavenderMagazine.com
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July 31–August 13, 2009 [Dining Guide] Mon: Closed • Tues – Wed: 11:30 AM –
July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009 [Dining Guide] Mon: Closed • Tues – Wed: 11:30 AM – 2
July 31–August 13, 2009 [Dining Guide] Mon: Closed • Tues – Wed: 11:30 AM – 2
July 31–August 13, 2009 [Dining Guide] Mon: Closed • Tues – Wed: 11:30 AM – 2

[Dining Guide]

Mon: Closed • Tues – Wed: 11:30 AM – 2 PM, 5 PM

– 9 PM • Thurs – Fri: 11:30 AM – 2 PM,

• Sat:

5 PM – 10 PM

4 PM – 8 PM

12 noon – 2 PM,

5 – 10 PM • Sun:

PARK TAVERN BOWLING & ENTERTAIN- MENT CENTER $

American 50 years of dining & entertainment – award winning food, groups up to 300. Weekend Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Late Night Daily

3401 Louisiana Ave., St. Louis Park (952) 929-6810

Mon – Fri: 10:30 AM – 12:30 AM • Sat – Sun: 9 AM

– 12:30 AM

RESTAURANT MAX $$

Lifestyle cuisine Have the experience you are looking for – food, por- tions and cocktails that support your lifestyle. Lunch, Dinner

215 4 th St. S., Minneapolis (612) 340-0303

Sun – Sat:

11 AM – 2 AM

SEA CHANGE $$

Seafood Under the masterful eye of chef Tim McKee, the core menu focuses on sustainable seafood. Sea Change uses only the freshest fish & shellfish from sustainable fisheries & environmentally responsible farms. Lunch, Dinner Guthrie Theater, 818 S. 2 nd St., Minneapolis (612) 225-6499 Lunch: Tues – Sun. 11:30 AM – 2 PM • Dinner: Mon – Thurs: 5 – 10 PM, Fri – Sat: 5 – 11 PM, Sun 5 – 9 PM

SPYHOUSE COFFEE SHOP $

Coffee, espresso, pastries

2451

Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis

(612) 871-3177

2404

Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis

Mon – Fri: 6:30 AM – Midnight • Sat – Sun: 8 AM -- Midnight

SUSHI TANGO $$

Japanese Exciting and eccentric mix of Japanese cuisine and Uptown attitude. Lunch, Dinner Calhoun Square, (612) 822-7787 Mon – Wed: 5 PM – 1 AM • Thurs – Sun: Noon – 1 AM

TIGER SUSHI $

Asian Fusion

A bold fusion of flavors and cultures take you beyond traditional sushi. A hip vibe & exceptional chefs. MOA location: Lunch & Dinner 11 AM – 9:30 Daily (952) 876-9410 Lyn-Lake location: Daily Dinner, Weekend Lunch

2833 Lyndale Ave. S., Minneapolis (612) 8774-1800

Mon – Fri: 5 – 10:30 PM • Sat: Noon – 10:30 PM • Sun:

Noon – 9:00 PM

TOAST WINE BAR AND CAFÉ $

Wine bar with Italian influence

Neighborhood wine bar serving pizzas, cured meats and small plates. Dinner

415 N. 1 st St., Minneapolis, MN

(612) 333-4305

Tues – Thurs: 5 PM – 11 PM • Fri – Sat: 5 PM – 12 AM

• Sun:

5 PM – 11 PM

WILDE ROAST CAFÉ $

American

Homemade, comfort food, outstanding desserts, beer, wine, espresso drinks. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

518 E. Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis (612) 331-4544

Mon – Sat: 7 AM – 11 PM • Sun: 7 AM – 9 PM

ZEN FUSION RESTAURANT $

Asian Contemporary

Authentic

French twist.

Lunch, Dinner

3016 Lyndale Ave. S., Minneapolis (612) 822-8896

Sun – Thurs: 11 AM – 9 PM • Fri – Sat: 11 AM – 10 PM

pan-Asian

food

with

a

contemporary

(612) 822-8896 Sun – Thurs: 11 AM – 9 PM • Fri – Sat: 11 AM
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The Network

The Network A ccounting A ddiction Info A s t r o l o g y
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The Network A ccounting A ddiction Info A s t r o l o g y
The Network A ccounting A ddiction Info A s t r o l o g y

Astrology

A ccounting A ddiction Info A s t r o l o g y A t

Attorneys

July 31–August 13, 2009
July 31–August 13, 2009

Attorneys

e y s July 31–August 13, 2009 A t t o r n e y s
31–August 13, 2009 A t t o r n e y s A utomotive B a

Barbers

A t t o r n e y s A utomotive B a r b e
e y s A utomotive B a r b e r s B usiness Services Out

Out in the Stars |

B a r b e r s B usiness Services Out in the Stars | [

[ by Charlene Lichtenstein ]

Horoscope for July 31-Aug. 13 Welcome the dog days of August, as our personal planets move into new signs and new energies. We pant at the expectation, and sit up and take notice of oppor- tunity. How long will it take us to manifest our cosmic destinies? Ah, therein lies the tale.

to manifest our cosmic destinies? Ah, therein lies the tale. ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 20) Everything starts
to manifest our cosmic destinies? Ah, therein lies the tale. ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 20) Everything starts

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 20)

Everything starts out all fun and gaymes this period, but soon enough, your party plans may get out of hand. Proud Rams are in the middle of all the festivities. But will you take on too much at once? Stop grabbing for glories before you find yourself stalled, dissipated, or just plain overwhelmed. Better find a few able hands to help out. Lower. Lower.

TAURUS (APRIL 21-MAY 21)

It is a good time to attend to home-based chores and issues. But if you allow relatives to demand too much of your time and attention, you will jeopardize your ca- reer opportunities. Draw a line in the sand, and parse out your energies carefully. Queer Bulls should do what they can when they can, and no more. Try to defer all important family decisions until the fall.

GEMINI (MAY 22-JUNE 21)

Pink Twins with a yearning to gossip should wait un- til the end of August before they leak their headlines. The fates will conspire to blow anything you say out of proportion, and deliver you certain unpleasant conse- quences. All eyes are upon you. Why take the risk with any indiscretions? Tittle-tattle lost the battle. Try more for the former and less of the latter.

CANCER (JUNE 22-JULY 23)

Lavish spending may make you very popular in certain circles and among some very sexy company. Life looks exciting through most of the period. See how long you can keep your pricey popularity index rising. In the long run, however, you will find that those who love you for yourself and not for your bank balance are worth more than gold. But not now.

The Network

The Network LEO (JULY 24-AUGUST 23) Proud Lions need to command center stage. But your demanding

LEO (JULY 24-AUGUST 23)

Proud Lions need to command center stage. But your demanding personal presence may begin to grate on those close to you. Try to share the spotlight (or at least the credit) with partners. You will not be able to per- form at your peak unless you have their support. For Leos on the prowl, talk less about yourself and more about the other person. Difficult to do, I know.

VIRGO (AUGUST 24-SEPTEMBER 23)

Things going on behind the scene might cause you ex- tra stress. The best thing to do is to open up your closet, and air it out. Unleash all secrets, and let things shrink in the light of day. Nothing is so burdensome that you can’t lighten the load. Also, deferring any unpleasant job task will not make it go away. But delegating it will.

LIBRA (SEPTEMBER 24-OCTOBER 23)

Your presence is demanded at every top-tier event. How can you disappoint your admirers by staying at home? You can’t, proud Libra. Resolve to dance at as many social events as possible without getting tossed out for bad behavior. You will have plenty of time in the autumn to warm yourself by the fire with some hot toddy. Search for your hot toddy now.

SCORPIO (OCTOBER 24-NOVEMBER 22)

You finally gain some traction in your career path, only to be sideswiped by a family issue. Balance, diplomacy, and patience will mean everything to you now. Find ways of making people do what you want them to do without their realizing it. Queer Scorps will learn how to develop a keen sense of perspective…but, from what height and angle?

SAGITTARIUS (NOVEMBER 23-DECEMBER 22)

Travel is highlighted, so don’t sit at home, and wait for inspiration. Find it far afield. Gay Archers with a sense of adventure will find it in the most unlikely places. Bring a camera, and keep a diary. If you decide to try the local tongue, practice and carefully monitor your communication. Things could get lost or misunder- stood in the translation.

CAPRICORN (DECEMBER 23-JANUARY 20)

You have a certain animal magnetism now. Will you share your sizzle with some well-done sides of beef? Or will you be content to share your sugar with an array of sweet cakes? Whatever your tasting menu has to offer, make good use of time. Before you know it, palates and prefer- ences will change. Don’t become an after-dinner mint.

AQUARIUS (JANUARY 21-FEBRUARY 19)

Reach out and make important connections all through August. Aqueerians have an ability to bring people together, and in doing so, enhance their own social standing. Important folks gravitate to you, so don’t let your best ideas lie fallow. Push your agenda; start new things; and enlist help and advice. Everything blooms in the winter, as you will see.

PISCES (FEBRUARY 20-MARCH 20)

Your work environment becomes a place of harmony and mellowness. At least, it will seem that way. Go with the collegial flow, making new friends and alliances. Guppies with some long and arduous projects to com- plete will find some colleagues willing to help out. So, allow yourself to be wafted on a cloud of cooperation

before it loses air in September.

on a cloud of cooperation before it loses air in September. © 2009 THE STARRY EYE,

© 2009 THE STARRY EYE, LLC. All Rights Reserved. For Enter- tainment Purposes Only. Lichtenstein’s blog <www.thestarry- eye.typepad.com> covers everything New Age. Her astrology book HerScopes: A Guide to Astrology for Lesbians is the best in tongue-in-cheek astrology.

is the best in tongue-in-cheek astrology. C hiropractors C omputer Services F uneral Services F inancial
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