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Antique Japanese

Swords For Sale



As of November 22, 2013
Tokyo, Japan


The following pages contain descriptions of genuine
antique Japanese swords currently available for
ownership or recently sold.

Each sword can be legally owned and exported
outside of Japan. All swords have certification
papers (origami) such as from NBTHK & NTHK-NPO.

Descriptions and availability are subject to change
without notice.

Please enquire for additional images and information
on swords of interest to service@uniquejapan.com"


We look forward to assisting you both in Japan.



Pablo Kuntz
Founder, unique japan


Unique Japan, Fine Art Dealer
Antiques license issued by Meguro City
Tokyo, Japan (No.303291102398)

Feel the history.
uniquejapan.com

Index of Japanese Swords for Sale

# SWORDSMITH & TYPE CM CERTIFICATE ERA / PERIOD PRICE
2 A KANETSUGU KATANA 73.0 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Gendaito (~1940) 495,000
3 A KOREKAZU KATANA 68.7 Tokubetsu Hozon Shoho (1644~1648) 3,200,000
8 A KIYOMITSU KATANA 67.6 NBTHK Hozon 2nd Eiroku (1559) 2,500,000
15 A SUKEHIRO WAKIZASHI 46.4 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Eisho era (1504~1520) 600,000
16 AN IESUKE WAKIZASHI 49.2 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Tenbun (1532~1555) 600,000
SOLD A HIRAKUNI WAKIZASHI 32.4 NBTHK Hozon Bunki (1501-1503) 580,000
28 A NOBUTAKA TANTO 20.0 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Kyoho era (1716~1735) 530,000
29 A TSUNAHIRO TANTO 17.8 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Manji era (1658-1660) 545,000
30 A YOSHIMITSU TANTO 21.3 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Daiei era (1521~1527) 450,000
31 A NOBUKUNI TANTO 21.3 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Eikyo era (1429~1441) 600,000
32 A HOKKE TANTO 29.8 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Tensho (1573~1592) 585,000
34 A MUNEAKI TANTO 18.2 NBTHK Kicho Bunkyu (1861~1863) 425,000
35 A TOKUMASA TANTO 20.5 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Keio era (1865~1868) 350,000
36 AN UJISHIGE TANTO 20.4 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Meiwa (1764~1771) 400,000
43 A YOSHIHIRO WAKIZASHI 33.9 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Tenpo era (1830~1844) 530,000
50 A KUNIYOSHI KATANA 63.9 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Oan era (1368~1374) 1,380,000
SOLD AN IESHIGE KATANA 63.4 NBTHK Hozon Kanei era (1624~1645) 925,000
SOLD A TSUNAHIRO KATANA 63.5 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Tensho (1573~1592) 1,190,000
53 A KUNIHIKO KATANA 68.7 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Tenpo era (1830~1844) 1,200,000
55 A SHIGEKUNI WAKIZASHI 45.1 NBTHK Hozon Kanei era (1624~1645) 810,000
56 A MUNETSUGU WAKIZASHI 58.9 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Kanei era (1624~1645) 755,000
57 A NOBUIE WAKIZASHI 48.2 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Meireki era (1655~1657) 610,000
58 A MASATOSHI WAKIZASHI 53.7 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Shoho era (1645~1648) 900,000
59 A NOBUKUNI WAKIZASHI 51.3 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Oei era (1394~1427) 950,000
61 A KUNIKANE WAKIZASHI 44.2 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Kanbun (1661~1672) 790,000
65 A RYOKAI KATANA 66.5 NTHK-NPO & NBTHK Kagen era (1303~1305) 2,380,000
66 A MORIYUKI KATANA 64.2 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Oei era (1394~1427) 1,111,000
76 A KASUGA DAIMYOJIN KABUTO (SAMURAI HELMET) Mid-Edo (~1700s) 700,000
SOLD A MOROKAGE WAKIZASHI 44.5 NTHK Kanteisho x 2 Oei era (1394-1427) 500,000
80 A KUNIHISA TANTO 25.2 NBTHK & NTHK Enpo era (1673-1681) 800,000
81 A KIYOSADA WAKIZASHI 51.2 NB Tokubetsu Kicho Eiroku era (158-1570) 700,000
SOLD A KANETSUNA WAKIZASHI 51.5 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Tenbun (1532~1555) 450,000
83 A MORISHIGE KATANA 76.0 NBTHK Hozon Oei era (1394~1427) 1,500,000
84 A YOSHIMICHI WAKIZASHI 46.8 NB Tokubetsu Kicho Kanbun (1661-1672) 1,290,000
85 AN IEMORI KATANA 75.2 NBTHK Hozon + Kicho Oan era (1368~1374) 1,900,000
86 A KANEMICHI WAKIZASHI 44.7 NB Koshu Tokubetsu Kanbun (1661-1672) 930,000
87 A NOBUHIDE KATANA 73.3 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Bunkyu era (1861-1863) 1,500,000
SOLD A MASAMORI KATANA 67.5 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Tenbun (1532~1555) 1,300,000
SOLD A KUNITOMO WAKIZASHI 52.1 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Tenbun (1532~1555) 880,000
92 A YOSHITAKE WAKIZASHI 55.6 NBTHK Hozon Tenna era (1681-1683) 1,000,000
94 A MARUGAME CLAN YAMAZAKI FAMILY SET OF ARMOR Early Edo Period 1,800,000
96 A YOSHIMITSU KATANA 67.5 NTHK-NPO Kanteisho Kansho era (1460-1466) 1,100,000
97 A SADAYUKI WAKIZASHI 39.3 NBTHK Hozon Jyou era (1652-1654) 990,000
98 A MUNEMICHI WAKIZASHI 56.3 NTHK Kanteisho x 2 Kanbun (1661-1672) 525,000





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To online visitors around the world

Welcome! We completely respect the fact it takes a huge leap of
personal faith in us to commit to a particular sword(s) given the
reliance on photos and descriptions for such a highly valued item.

It is our promise to address all your questions to the best of our
ability. Its important to us that you feel completely confident that
the sword you choose (and chooses you) is destined for your family.

Please can take reassurance that all swords from Unique Japan are
guaranteed authentic and come with a 3-day worry free inspection
period upon arrival to your home.



2 (item no. ujka041)
A KANETSUGU KATANA
unsigned, showa period (circa 1940s)

Swordsmith: IMAI KANETSUGU (atrtribution)
Length (ubu): 73.0cm
Curvature: 2.1cm
Hamon: Suguha (straight) and ko-midare (small peaks of waves)
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Koshirae, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance kit, printed care
guide, DVD, registration and all exportation paperwork to home country

495,000 (~$5,210)

In 1943 a list was published by the Nihon Token Tanrenjo (NTT) and the Nihon Token
Shinbunshi (NTS) ranking what were then "modern" (gendai) swordsmiths.

This was prior to the current system of rating used by either the NBTHK or NTHK-
NPO.

Imai Kanetsugu, who crafted this sword, was ranked as the top Sekiwake a superior
swordsmith. The hamon (temper line) is a mixture of straight suguha and several
beautiful tiny waves appear when drawn to the light.

A gold-colored silk tsuka (hilt) and other quality koshirae (fittings) make up this enviably
muscular katana.



3 (item no. ujka044)
A MUSASHI DAIJO KOREKAZU KATANA
signed, edo period (shoho era: 1644~1648)

Inscription: ,|] (omote)
Location: Musashi, Edo (Tokyo)
Length (ubu): 68.7cm
Curvature: 1.8cm
Hamon: Daichoji Midare (large waves and cloves)
Certificate: NBTHK Tokubetsu Hozon (a sword designated as Especially Worthy of
Conservation issued by the Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya (magnolia scabbard), silk carry bag,
sword stand, maintenance kit, printed care guide, DVD and exportation services

3,200,000 (~$33,684)

Korekazu was one of the very greatest swordsmiths during the Shinto era (16
th
to 17
th

centuries). Korekazu was a member of the Ishido School and eventually became the
finest swordsmith of the Edo Ishido School about 350 years ago.

The Ishido School originated at the Sekido Temple in Omi Province around the Kanei
period (1624). From there the smiths went to various sections of the country to found
branch Ishido schools.

Some went to Kii Province and came to be known as the Kishi Ishido. Later Tameyasu led
this group to Osaka. Others went to Edo, the most famous of these being Ishido Musashi
Korekazu who forged this sword.

The Ishido School smiths were best known for their ability to make swords in the Bizen
tradition of the Ichimonji School. They were well known for their hamon, which was a
robust choji midare, which sometimes reached the shinogi.

A spectacular leather-bound tachi koshirae (~400 years old) mounts this King of katanas.





8 (item no. ujka058)
A KIYOMITSU KATANA
signed & dated, late muromachi period
2
nd
year of eiroku (august 1559)

Inscription: ]|[j[] (omote) 7,=1)| (ura)
Swordsmith: BIZEN NO KUNI JU OSAFUNE KIYOMITSU
Location: Bizen province (present-day Okayama prefecture)
Length (ubu): 67.6cm
Curvature: 1.5cm
Hamon: Wide suguha and notare, gunome and choji midare, midare-utsuri
Certificate: NBTHK Hozon (a sword designated as Worthy of Conservation by the
Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Fujishiro: Jo-Saku (ranked as a superior swordsmith)
Included: Koshirae, shirasaya, silk katana bags, sword stand, maintenance kit,
printed care guide, DVD, and all legal paperwork to export to home country

2,500,000 (~$26,315)

The Kiyomitsu family were prestigious Bizen swordmakers in the Late Muromachi
Period. This is a stunning katana made by the second generation (ni-dai) known as
Magouemon-no-jo Kiyomitsu who is the son of Gorozaemon.

Fujishiro judged his work to be superior, clearly evident in this katana. A strong
hakikakeboshi (brush-stroke tip) formed of nie crystals demonstrates such skill.

The koshirae is made by a metalsmith from Mino province. Fuchigashira is shakudo-nanako-
uchi, its design is the flower of kiku (chrysanthemum, the emblem of the Imperial family)
with gold high relief engraving (takabori).

There is a dragon gold engraving in the mimi (the edge of tsuba). A pure gold ise-ebi
(Japanese lobster) menuki and a saya polished in lacquer with gold dusting caps off this
delightful katana.










15 (item no. ujwa061)
A SUKEHIRO WAKIZASHI
signed, muromachi period (eisho era: 1504~1520)

Inscription: (omote)
Swordsmith: SOSHU JU SUKEHIRO
Location: Soshu province (Kamakura area)
Length: 46.4cm
Curvature: 1.3cm
Nakago: Ubu
Hamon: Gunome and togari with some nijuba
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance kit,
printed care guide, DVD, registration and all exportation paperwork

600,000 (~$6,315)


The Society for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword (NTHK-NPO) judged this sword
as fifth generation Soshu Ju Sukehiro of the Eisho Era (1504~1520), 500 years ago.

Signed Soshu tradition swords are a rare treat and Sukehiro is a highly ranked
swordsmith. Soshu traditions can be traced back to the great Masamune.

The koshirae (mounts) feature a mouse and dango (rice dumplings). Look out for the
mounted Samurai on horseback with a gunbai (war fan) on the menuki.
Referees in Sumo tournaments carry a similar gunbai, and use it to point to the winner of
each match.

A shakudo polished tsuba (guard) finishes off this unique piece of history.






16 (item no. ujwa062)
AN IESUKE WAKIZASHI
signed, muromachi period (tenbun era: 1532~1555)

Inscription: (omote)
Swordsmith: KAGA NO KUNI IESUKE
Length: 49.2cm
Curvature: 1.3cm
Hamon: Midare gunome (wavy circles) with choji (cloves) and a lots of utsuri
Jihada: Itame nagare (rolling grain) and masame (straight grain)
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance
kit, printed care guide, DVD, exportation paperwork to home country

600,000 (~$6,315)

This is a brilliant wakizashi that has recently been given a full polish and it simply looks
amazing.

The hamon is chock full of activity including bari bari utsuri, for sword aficionados, this
is steel craftsmanship to truly appreciate.

It was awarded NTHK-NPO Kanteisho as KAGA NO KUNI IESUKE who was a
swordsmith that lived in the Tenbun Era (1532-1555) in Kanazawa.

The classy koshirae is dominated by an arabesque motif for the fuchigashira (collar and
pommel).

Menuki (ornamental grips in the hilt) is of a Japanese fan and sakura (cherry blossom),
the national tree of Japan.





21 (item no. ujwa072)
A HIRAKUNI WAKIZASHI
unsigned, muromachi period (bunki era: 1501~1503)

Swordsmith: UDA HIRAKUNI (attribution)
Location: Ecchu province (Toyama prefecture)
Length: 32.4cm
Curvature: 0.1 cm
Hamon: Suguha and notare, togari-shin and gunome
Certificate: NBTHK Hozon (a sword designated as Worthy of Conservation by the
Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance
kit, printed care guide, DVD and exportation services to home country

SOLD

The antique shirasaya that holds this interesting wakizashi reads (sayagaki) that it was
made by Hokke Ichijo, which a very prestigious smith from Bingo province in the early
15th century. A respected polisher within our circles believes the sword could be made
by Naoe-Shizu from the Nambokucho era (14th century).

As the piece is unsigned, its up for interpretation. The experts at the NBTHK have
given the nod to Uda Hirakuni, which is a relatively conservative assessment. This
sword feels older and more valuable that its certification leads it to be.

The very pleasing antique koshirae (fittings) is one based on a nautical theme of a plover
birds flying free above the waves below. The kawari-saya is made with crushed mother-
of-pearl sprinkled delicately with depictions of white plover birds within.

The saya's koikuchi (mouth) and kurigata (thread hole) are beautifully wrapped by
samegawa (ray skin) that has been dyed green.



28 (item no. ujta014)
A NOBUTAKA TANTO
signed, edo period (kyoho era: 1716~1735)

Inscription: ]{J, (omote)
Swordsmith: HOUKI NO KAMI NOBUTAKA
Location: Owari province (present day Aichi prefecture)
Length: 20.0cm
Nakago: Ubu
Hamon: Suguha with Ko-Ashi (straight with tiny legs)
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Fujishiro: Jo-saku (ranked as a superior swordsmith of his generation)
Included: Koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance kit,
printed care guide, DVD, registration and all exportation paperwork

530,000 (~$5,578)

Houki no Kami Nobutaka, chairman of the Seki Swordsmiths Association, was the
personal swordsmith of Owari Tokugawa Shogun family.

This is a very high-class Samurai tanto made 300 years ago during the Kyoho era a
time in which Tokyo (Edo) became the worlds largest city with all of 1.1million people!

The kasane (spine) is very thick, especially crafted to penetrate armor. These robust
tantos were highly prized by the Samurai class.

Complimenting the power of the piece is a Higo Zougan koshirae that elegantly secures
the sword. The saya (scabbard) features crushed blue shells, which are skillfully
decorated and secured layer-by-layer with Japanese lacquer.

The shakudo kozuka (paper knife) is signed by ,. (Shitsu Saburou Kaneuchi), a
well-known sword-fitting craftsman.





29 (item no. ujta015)
A TSUNAHIRO TANTO
signed, edo period (manji era: 1658~1660)

Inscription: _`.(omote) [!(ura)
Swordsmith: ISE DAIJO TSUNAHIRO
Length (ubu): 17.8cm
Hamon: Notare, Sunagashi, Yubashiri and Kinsuji
Jihada: Masame (straight grain)
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Fujishiro: Jo-saku (ranked as a superior swordsmith of his generation)
Included: Vintage koshirae, signed shirasaya, silk carry bag, sword stand,
maintenance kit, printed care guide, DVD, registration and all exportation paperwork

545,000 (~$5,736)

Regarded as a superior swordsmith, fifth generation Tsunahiro pays tribute to the greatest of all
sword makers (Masamune), with this signed Samurai family tanto as Momijigari. Momijigari
means appreciating the turning of the maple tree leaves in autumn.

In the same spirit Ohanami (appreciating the blooming of sakura blossoms in spring), it was
popular to observe the maple trees change color by the Yoshino River in the fall. Maple leaves
fall on river turning the water into a flowing canvas of rich, vibrant colors.

This tanto has a famous funa-gata nakago (a tang with a wide bulge that is said to resemble a
boat). It reads _`. (Momijigari) on the front and [! (Masamune) on the back.

The shirasaya (magnolia scabbard) is further signed (sayagaki) and reads )j|' (Soshu Ju
Tsunahiro), 5 Sun 8 Bu (the traditional measurement of the blade). An elegant set of Edo-
period koshirae (fittings) further compliments this little Japanese treasure piece.




31 (item no. ujta017)
A NOBUKUNI TANTO
unsigned, muromachi period (eikyo era: 1429~1441)

Swordsmith: NOBUKUNI (attribution)
Length: 21.3cm
Curvature: Uchizori (inward curving)
Hamon: Gunome midare (irregular waves), yahazu
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Fujishiro: Jo-saku (ranked as a superior swordsmith of his generation)
Included: Shirasaya, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance kit, printed care
guide, DVD and exportation services

600,000 (~$6,315)

Son of Saemonnojo Nobukuni, Shikibunojo Nobukuni is a prestigious swordsmith ranked with
the likes of Bizens Morimitsu and Yoshimitsu. Early on his was known as Nobusada.

Works span from the Oei to Eikyo (1394~1429). The hamon (temper line) is very distinctive, in
some places two continuous gunome are fused together, becoming yahazu (fish-tail shaped). The
Nobukuni School is highly stared for their horimono (engravings).

The vintage issaku koshirae (matching fittings) are absolutely stunning. Fuchigashira and menuki
(collar & pommel & ornamental grips) are made out of shakudo-nanako with gold yo-bori
carvings that feature blossoming peonies, the king of Japanese flowers symbolizing wealth,
good fortune, honor, and bravery. The gold threading on the tsuka (hilt) shows Samurai status.

Saya is lacquered in black and polished with a Samurai Kaeshi-zuno (a hook-shaped fitting).


32 (item no. ujta018)
A HOKKE TANTO
signed, muromachi period (tensho era: 1573~1592)

Inscription:
Swordsmith: HOKKE
Location: Mino (Gifu prefecture)
Length: 29.8cm
Hamon: Koshibiraki-gunome-midare
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the
Society for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance kit,
printed care guide, DVD and exportation services to home country

585,000 (~$6,157)

The Hokke name originates from Bingo province in Hiroshima, so it is likely that the Hokke
smith who made this tanto travelled to Mino from Bingo province as swordsmiths often did.

The hamon (temper line) is a well-crafted koshibiraki gunome midare (which are clove blossoms
following a wavy pattern. It is a distinctive hamon found on swords crafted in the Bizen
tradition in modern-day Okayama.

A most splendid set of koshirae fittings known as Denchu-Sashi-Koshirae meant for wear in the
Imperial palacegrace this tanto. Fuchi(collar) circa late 1700s is made from shakudowith gold
taka-yo-bori carvings of Hakime (sand) and plants. Signed: Kitosai Omori Terumitsu Kao.

Shakudo menuki (ornamental grip) feature a most rare depiction of horin (Dharmachakra, a
symbol of the Buddhist wheel of life that leads to enlightenment). A Ko-kinko-tsuba (antique
guard) from the Muromachi period also features horin with kiku (chrysanthemum flowers of the
Imperial family).

This tanto was surely owned by a Samurai with highly respected status.





34 (item no. ujta020)
A MUNEAKI TANTO
unsigned, late edo period (bunkyu era: 1861~1863)

Swordsmith: ICHINOSEKI MUNEAKI (attribution)
Location: Ichinoseki, Rikuchu (Iwate prefecture)
Length (ubu): 18.2cm
Hamon: Gunome-midare and yubashiri
Certificate: NBTHK Kicho (a sword designated Precious by the Society for the
Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance
kit, printed care guide, DVD and exportation services to home country

425,000 (~$4,473)

According to Fujishiro in Nihon Shinto Jiten, of swordsmith Muneaki both his style and mei
(inscription) have the flavor of Katayama Munetsugu, an he is said to have especially given attention
to sharpness.

Upper-class swordsmith Muneaki was indeed a pupil of the most famous smiths in the late
Edo period, Koyama Munetsugu. They lived in Rikuchu Ichinoseki (Iwate Prefecture).

The aikuchi-koshirae (fittings) is made from iron and splashes of silver pay tribute the milky
waygalaxy. The rather intriguing menuki has yo-bori engraving made in the form of a
spool.

A beautiful Kawari-saya is lined with scatterings of mother-of pearl secures the tanto.


35 (item no. ujta021)
A TOKUMASA TANTO
unsigned, late edo period (keio era: 1865~1868)

Swordsmith: DEN TOKUMASA (attribution)
Location: Mito, Hitachi no Kuni (Ibaraki prefecture)
Length (ubu): 20.5cm
Curvature: 0.1cm
Hamon: Gunome and notare with kinsen
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance
kit, printed care guide, DVD and exportation services to home country

350,000 (~$3,684)

Tokumasa was swordsmith from Mito in Hitachi no Kuni (Ibaraki prefecture) and a pupil of
prominent swordsmiths Katsumura Norikatsu and Ichige Tokurin.

Beautifully crafted with gentle gunome hamon (wavy temper line), the tanto is secured in a
black-lacqured kizamisaya in aikuchi koshirae.

The menuki(ornamental grips)made from shakudo-nanako are in the form of kiku
(chrysanthemum, the floral emblem of the Imperial family) encircled by gosan no kiri (which
was the imperial crest or kamon given by the Emperor to the Ashikaga.)

In 1568, Ashikaga Yoshiaki gave Nobunaga permission to use the "Go-San-no-Kiri" imperial
kamon, as well as the Ashikaga family emblem, the "Futa-Hiki-Ryou".

This very prestigious gift of two family emblems was given to Nobunaga in thanks for his
effectively having Yoshiaki installed as Shogun.




36 (item no. ujta022)
AN UJISHIGE TANTO
unsigned, edo period (meiwa era: 1764~1771)

Swordsmith: DEN HARIMA NO KUNI UJISHIGE (attribution)
Location: Tegarayama, Harima no Kuni (Hyogo prefecture)
Length: 20.4cm
Hamon: Doranba and uchinoke and yo
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya (magnolia scabbard), silk carry bag,
sword stand, maintenance kit, printed care guide, DVD and exportation services to
home country

400,000 (~$4,210)

This very attractive tanto by swordsmith Ujishige belonged to the Tegarayama School in
Hyogo, nestled between Bizen and Kyoto provinces.

There were many generations of Tegarayama Ujishige, the fourth generation of which this
sword was made moved to Shirakawa in Oshu (Iwate prefecture) and changed his name to
Masashige.Tegarayama Masashige then became a prominent swordsmith during Shinshinto (late
Edo) period.

A matching set of fittings (issaku koshirae) made from shinchu is referred to a sogaki-koshirae
beautifully compliments the blade. It consists of kizami-saya and kizami-tsuka (a rounded-
texture) made from leather kawa-maki. The design depicts tanabata a wood considered by the
Japanese to originate from the heavens symbolizing luck and long life.

There is a famous Tanabata star festival in Japan that celebrates the meeting of the deities
Orihime and Hikoboshi (represented by the stars Vega and Altair respectively). According to
legend, the Milky Way separates these lovers, allowed to meet only once a year on the seventh
day of the seventh lunar month of the luni-solar calendar.





43 (item no. ujwa081)
A YOSHIHIRO WAKIZASHI
unsigned, late edo period (tenpo era: 1830~1844)

Swordsmith: DEN EDO IKKANSAI YOSHIHIRO (attribution)
Length (ubu): 33.9cm
Curvature: 0.4cm
Jihada: Wavy Itame
Hamon: Gunome-Midare and Ashi
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance kit,
printed care guide, DVD and exportation services

530,000 (~$5,578)

Ikkansai Yoshihiro was a pupil of Suishinshi Masahide and his name relates to the fact that
he was skilled at creating swords in the style of Go no Yoshihiro - one of Masamunes
infamous Jittetsu (10 students) in the Kenmu period (1334-1336).

Not many of Yoshihiros swords are actually in existence so this is a fortunate find.
Yoshihiro was known for hitatsura-like hamon and midareba. The jihada (surface grain) has
a dazzling wavy o-itame forging technique.

Yoshihiro swords pay tribute to the Soshu tradition of the koto period. Fujishiro
(leading sword appraiser) refers to his works as nothing but beautiful.

One aspect of this sword that can be enjoyed is the funa-gata nakago (fune means boat).
The line of the cutting edge has a deep outward bulge. This is a rare nakago and
associated with Masamune of Soshu and his school. Edo-period koshirae has a lovely
kozuka (paper knife) with the design of a peony and shisa lions.



50 (item no. ujka069)
AN ENJU KUNIYOSHI KATANA
unsigned, nanbokucho period (oan era: 1368~1374)

Swordsmith: Den Higo Enju Kuniyoshi (attribution)
Location: Higo province (present-day Kumamoto)
Length: 63.9cm
Curvature: 1.7cm
Jihada: Itame
Hamon: Hoso Suguha (thin straight temperline). Gunome on only one side!
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

1,380,000 (~$14,226)

The Enju School can trace itself back to both the Yamashiro Rai School and the Yamato
tradition from Nara. The story begins with Hiromura from the Yamato Shikkake School
who moved to Kyoto to study under the great Rai Kuniyuki.

Hiromuras son, Kunimura, who is said to have married one of Kuniyukis daughters,
moved to Higo province (Kumamoto prefecture) to start the Enju School in about 1312.

One of Kunimuras finest students, Kuniyoshi, is attributed to have forged this katana.
It carries all the quality hallmarks of the Rai brand, especially the hoso suguha (thin
straight temper line). It also has a long bo-hi (groove) extending the length of the blade.

The creative koshirae features a fuchigashira made out of shakudo nanako-uchi with
depictions of owls, birds, frogs and a wild chrysanthemum with takabori. The menuki is
formed of shakudo covered with gold with the design of crow and the rising sun. A rare
otsubu samekawa coated tsukamaki is wrapped with brown-lacquered leather cord.

The tsuba is from the Kinko School and made from polished shakudo migaki with katakiri-
bori in the design of wild grass on a field. Saya is layered with an antique ishime-ji finish.



51 (item no. ujka072)
AN IESHIGE KATANA
unsigned, edo period (kanei era: 1624-1645)

Swordsmith: Kashu Fujiwara Ieshige (attribution)
Location: Kaga province (present-day Ishikawa)
Length: 63.4cm
Curvature: 1.3cm
Jihada: Ko-Itame
Hamon: Togari-shin and Gunome Choji-Midare
Nakago: Ubu (original condition tang)
Certificate: NBTHK Hozon (a sword designated as Worthy of Conservation by the
Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

SOLD

Fujiwara no Ieshige is regarded as the founder of Shinto Katsukuni School, which
flourished with his son Darani Katsukuni and several generations that carried on the
Katsukuni name. This katana is attributed to the Kanei era, corresponding to the first
generation Ieshige. It has an extended kissaki and a glorious wavy clove (choji) hamon.

Interesting to note, many swords that were made in Kashu (Ishikawa prefecture) have a
nakago with a distinctive shape where the tip (nakago-jiri) curves upwards. This is called
Ha-agari-Kurishiri. One could easily classify this remarkable sword to that of the Bizen
tradition, but the unique nakagojiri speaks poignantly to swords made from Kashu.

The artistic fittings include a fuchigashira made from shakudo and takabori in the design of
a flowering plant and a singing insect found in autumn in the Mino province. The tsuba
comprises also of shakudo and gold takabori in the shape of mokko-gata with full of
flowering plants in Mino and a powerful dragon in the mimi (edge of the tsuba).

Menuki is further made of shakudo and takabori with depictions of chrysanthemums.
Tsuka is weaved of fine jabara-maki and the saya is black-lacquered Inro-kizami.



52 (item no. ujka073)
A TSUNAHIRO KATANA (2
nd
generation)
unsigned, muromachi period (tensho era: 1573-1592)

Swordsmith: Soshu Tsunahiro 2
nd
generation (attribution)
Location: Odawara province (present-day Kanagawa)
Length (ubu): 63.5cm Curvature: 2.0cm
Jihada: Tight Itame
Hamon: Gunome-midare and Hitatsura
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Fujishiro: Jo-Saku (ranked as a superior swordsmith)
Included: Vintage koshirae, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance kit, DVD,
printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

SOLD

In the mid 1500s, first generation Tsunahiro moved from Kamakura to Odawara in Kanagawa
prefecture and worked for the emerging Hojo clan. Subsequently no less than twenty (20)
dedicated generations of the Tsunahiro swordsmith name supported the Tokugawa Shogunate
throughout the Edo Period to the Meiji period (1600~1867).

Swords made by the first and second generation Tsunahiro are the most prized of all. This
handsome katana is blessed with an eye-catching hamon and a well-forged body.

The powerful warrior-themed koshirae comprises of a fuchigashira made from shakudo-nanako
depicting Samurai in gold, copper and shakudo takabori. The marvelous menuki is formed of
marching Samurai in shakudo and gold takabori.

The iron tsuba is uniquely designed with fighting Samurai with gold, silver and copper inlay
with shakudo fukurin in mimi (tsubas edge). The kojiri (tip of the scabbard) is wrapped and
reinforced in iron with stately floral patterns. The gracefully curved saya is decorated in a rare
olive-green colour.



53 (item no. ujka075)
A KUNIHIKO PHOENIX KATANA
unsigned, edo period (tenpo era: 1830-1844)

Swordsmith: Bingo no Kuni Takenaka Kunihiko (attribution)
Location: Bingo province (present-day Hiroshima)
Length: 68.7cm
Curvature: 2.6cm
Jihada: Tight Nashiji-hada and Muji-fu
Hamon: Notare-Gunome and Togari-ba
Nakago: Ubu (original condition tang)
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage tachi koshirae with phoenix, silk carry bag, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

1,200,000 (~$12,371)

Kunihiko was born in Tajima (Hyogo prefecture). He studied under Kenryushi Toshiyuki
from the Hamabe School who was skilled at producing an excellent tight itame, almost muji-
hada giving the appearance of grainless steel. This is a noteworthy characteristic of
Shinshinto blades (swords made between 1781 and 1868).

Kunihiko first signed as Kunimitsu, then Kunitora, then Kunihiko, and finally to Takenaka
Kunihiko. He became the official swordsmith for the 7th Daimyo of Fukuyama clan, Abe
Masahiro who was worth 110,000 Koku in Hiroshima prefecture.

Tachi swords made 1,000 years ago inspired this
extremely curved katana. An incredible tachi koshirae
features an elaborate kashira in the form of a phoenix
(H!-!). The phoenix was adopted as a symbol of the
imperial household, particularly the empress
representing fire, the sun, justice, and fidelity.

Other fittings are made of shinchu with a gold finish. The saya (scabbard) is of Kinnashiji
(lacquered in gold aventurine) with arabesque swirls. This is a fabulous display piece.




55 (item no. ujwa087)
A SHIGEKUNI WAKIZASHI
unsigned, edo period (kanei era: 1624~1645)

Swordsmith: Monju Shigekuni (attribution)
Location: Kishu province (present-day Wakayama)
Length: 45.1cm
Curvature: 1.0cm
Jihada: Itame and Mokume and Jinie
Hamon: Naka-Suguha and deep Konie and Nijyuba (Double) and Ko-midare and
Kuichigaiba and Sunanagashi and Koashi. Hataraki in Hachu is lively.
Nakago: Ubu (original condition tang)
Certificate: NBTHK Hozon (a sword designated as Worthy of Conservation by the
Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance
kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

810,000 (~$8,350)

Shigekuni was Sai-Josaku (grandmaster), one of the finest swordsmiths of Shinto period.
His skill was regularly compared with the likes of Horikawa Kunihiro among all the
Keicho Shinto smiths. His strength lay in his production of clear and bright jihada
(surface grain) and a ha (cutting edge) that was second to none among other smiths.

Shigekuni belonged to the Monju-ha of the Yamato Tegai School and served Shogun
Tokugawa Ieyasu as one of his personal sword makers. After Ieyasu passed away in
1616, Shigekuni followed Ieyasus tenth son, Yorinobu to Kishu province. This is why
the swordsmith is called Nanki Shigekuni (Nanki is a place within Kishu.)

Fuchigashira is made out of shakudo-nanako and gold, silver and shakudo takabori with the
design of tiger and bamboo grass. Menuki is of a gold male and female dragon. The
tsuba is made out of iron with the shape of mokko-gata. Its design is of gold spray and
waves in katagiribori. Saya is black-lacquered in the form of an inro kizamisaya. The silk
sageo is wrapped in a ronin-musubi knot giving the impression it is the tail of a tiger.



56 (item no. ujwa088)
A MUNETSUGU WAKIZASHI (nearly katana length)
unsigned, edo period (kanei era: 1624-1645)

Swordsmith: Hizen Iyo no Jyo Munetsugu (attribution)
Location: Hizen province (present-day Saga prefecture)
Length: 58.9cm Curvature: 1.2cm
Jihada: Tight itame Hamon: Naka-Suguha and Gunome-Midare
Nakago: Ubu (original condition tang)
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the
Society for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance
kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

755,000 (~$7,947)

Shodai Munetsugu (first generation) was born in Nagase-mura circa (1542~1568) and is
considered to be the founder of Shinto Hizento. In fact, the great Shodai Tadayoshi was his
student from age 13 to 25. In 1606 he was appointed Jo Tsukasa-no-Kashira (person in charge
of all Hizen smiths). He was also the local religious leader, and shrine leader of Tenman-gu.

First and second generations of smiths known as Munetsugu Iyo no Jyo were both highly skilled
smiths. Either one can be credited (perhaps jointly) with this sword as there was an overlap in
the their respective careers. Shodai received the name of Muneyasu from Feudal lord, Nabeshima
Katsushige. He then succeeded his name to Munetsugu in his later years.

This beautiful wakizashi is formed in Katakiriha-zukuri where one side is shinogi-zukuri and
the other is kiriha-zukuri. This type originated at the end of the Kamakura period (1288-1334)
and was fashionable during Japans cultural renaissance from 1596-1643.

The fuchigashira is made out of shakudo-nanako in the design of flying dragon and gold takabori.
Menuki is made out of shakudo also in the design of dragon. The maru tsuba (round-shaped
guard) is exquisitely pounded in shakudo-nanako-uchi. The saya is lacquered in black with
spiraled shells sprinkled throughout. A gold dragon kozuka (paper knife) is signed, Houki no
Kami Fujiwara no Nobutaka and Hosaki. The wari kogai (hair spike) is of yamagane (copper)
expertly carved in a flying dragon.




57 (item no. ujwa089)
A NOBUIE WAKIZASHI
signed, edo period (meireki era: 1655~1657)

Swordsmith: Owari Izumi no Kami Nobuie (partly signed)
Location: Owari province (present-day Aichi prefecture)
Length: 48.2cm
Curvature: 1.4cm
Jihada: Tight Nashiji-hada and Muji-fu
Hamon: Notare-Gunome and Togari-ba
Nakago: Suriage (slightly shortened)
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance kit, DVD,
printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

610,000 (~$6,288)

Swordsmith Nobuie was mentored by second generation Nobutaka one of the finest smiths
of the Owari Seki School. His first kanji signature was J (Nobuie), he later changed it to
Jj (Nobuie) when he received the title Izumi no Kami. Fujishiro ranked Nobuie as Chu-
Josaku an above average swordsmith of his generation.

The sword is in fine condition; signed with part of the signature lost due to shortening.
It is polished in what is known as sashikomi-togi, the classical style polish aimed at showing
the blades natural face. No hadori (white pattern) is used on the blade.
One can admire a very complex yakiba (tempered surface between the ha and hamon).

Fuchi-gashira is of shakudo-nanako in the design of fighting Samurai at war. The menuki is
made out of shakudo and gold inlay with the design of the god Hotei's walking stick and
furoshiki (a parcel wrapped in cloth). This is known as Rusumoyo (Rusu means absent ,
Moyo means design.) This unique piece of art is designed to recall lucky Hotei! An iron
Heianjo tsuba with shinchu inlay of an arabesque pattern and heraldic design comes together
with a saya that is lacquered with mother-of-pearl scattered its entire length.




58 (item no. ujwa090)
A MASATOSHI WAKIZASHI
signed, edo period (shoho era: 1645-1648)

Swordsmith: Heianjo Ishido Ukon Masatoshi
Location: Yamashiro province (present-day Kyoto)
Length: 53.7cm
Curvature: 1.1cm
Jihada: Itame
Hamon: High temperature choji-midare
Nakago: Suriage (complete signature is visible)
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance
kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

900,000 (~$9,278)

A group of smiths that lived in Omi province are said to be descendants of the great
Bizen-province Ichimonji School, calling themselves Ishido. Swordsmiths from the Kishu
Ishido School worked exclusively for Kishu Tokugawa Family in Kishu, Wakayama.

During the Shoho era (1645-1648) swordsmiths from Kishu Ishido School moved to
various locales in the country. The Masatoshi group migrated to Kyo (Kyoto) and
swordsmith Masatoshi became the founder of the Kyo Ishido School.

Collectively the Ishido smiths were famous for producing swords with the iconic gunome
choji-midar hamon (clove-shaped temper line). Masatoshi was particularly skilled and
ranked above smiths of his generation and this sword is a prime example as such.

The fuchigashira is made out of shakudo and ishime-ji with the design of the Sawa family
Hachiyou ni maru kamon (8-planet crest), ancestors to the Fujiwara family. The tsukamaki
(hilt) is wrapped in leather cord. Menuki is of yamagane carved in the design of a crane
representing long life. The round iron maru-tsuba features a lovely arabesque pattern
with sukashi. The saya is lacquered with ishime-ji in an elegant chocolate-brown colour.




59 (item no. ujwa091)
A NOBUKUNI WAKIZASHI
unsigned, early muromachi period (oei era: 1394~1427)

Swordsmith: Yamashiro Shikibunojyo Nobukuni (attribution)
Location: Yamashiro province (present-day Kyoto)
Length: 51.3cm
Curvature: 1.5cm
Jihada: Itame
Hamon: Small Gunome-Midare and Naka-Yakihaba (Yahazu midare), a family trait
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance
kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork


950,000 (~$9,793)

This wakizashi is registered in the 26th year of Showa (1951), where only Damiyo families
(great feudal lords) were invited to submit their swords. It is a mark of great distinction.

Son of Saemonnojo Nobukuni, Shikibunojo Nobukuni is a prestigious swordsmith ranked with
the likes of Bizens Morimitsu and Yoshimitsu. Early on he was known as Nobusada.

Works span from Oei to Eikyo (1394~1429). The hamon (temper line) is very distinctive, in
some places two continuous gunome are fused together, becoming yahazu (fish-tail shaped).
The Nobukuni School is highly stared for their horimono (engravings) and this sword has a
long bo-hi (groove) extending the length of the blade.

The fuchigashira is formed of shakudo and ishime-ji and gold inlay in the design of a pine
needle and family crest. The menuki is formed of shakudo and gold with the design of
traveler on a ship on the wave of the sea.

The mokko tsuba is of yamagane with sukashi openwork in the design of paulownia flowers.
Hundreds of tiny black lines thread their way around the red saya to form a lucky silk spool.




61 (item no. ujwa092)
A KUNIKANE WAKIZASHI
unsigned, early edo period (kanbun era: 1661~1672)

Swordsmith: Yamashiro no Kami Kunikane 2nd generation (attribution)
Location: Sendai province (present-day Miyagi prefecture)
Length: 44.2cm
Curvature: 0.7cm
Jihada: Beautiful Masame-hada
Hamon: Naka-Suguha with Nijyu-ba and Hotsure
Nakago: Ubu (uncut)
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance
kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

790,000 (~$8,144)

Eldest son second generation Kunikane was born Hongo Kichizaemon. He is said to have
inherited the business from his father Shoho Ninen in 1645. He received the prestigious title
of Yamashiro no Kami in December 1667 and died at the age of 81 in 1672.

The family worked directly for the Date Masamune clan in Sendai (present-day Miyagi
prefecture). Following his fathers lead (and some say eventually surpassing his father in
skille), Kunikane swords are blessed with plenty of activity in the blade such as nijyuba
(double hamon), hotsure (strays along the hamon) and sunagashi (streaks of sand).

The masame-hada (straight grain), a distinguishing mark of swords made in the Yamato
tradition is absolutely beautiful and the center point to this wakizashi.

The koshirae carries a splendid dragon theme. Fuchigashira is made out of shakudo with
high-relief gold takabori carvings of a dragon and ume (plum blossom). Menuki is also of
gold dragon takabori.

An iron tsuba with katagiribori gold inlay juxtaposes powerful waves and a spiraling dragon.
Saya was once part of a Samurai daisho and is lacquered in black and polished beautifully.





65 (item no. ujka077)
A RYOKAI HISANOBU KATANA
unsigned, kamakura period (kagen era: 1303-1305)

Swordsmith: Ryokai Hisanobu (attribution)
Location: Yamashiro province (Kyoto)
Length: 66.5cm
Curvature: 2.2cm
Jihada: Itame and Nagaremasa and Jimon
Hamon: Thin Suguha and Konie
Certificate 1: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Certificate 2: NBTHK Tokubetsu Kicho (koshirae (sword fittings) designated as
Especially Precious by the Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Fujishiro: Jo-Saku (ranked as a superior swordsmith of his generation)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

2,380,000 (~$24,536)

This is a katana with truly remarkable pedigree. Yamashiro Ryokai Hisanobu (born
Kurozaemon) is the son of Yamashiro Ryokai and the grandson to one of the finest
swordsmiths that ever lived, Rai Kunitoshi of the Rai School in Kyoto.

Fujishiro ranks Ryokai Hisanobu as a superior smith of his generation. This speaks
volumes about his skill level given he was working at nearly the same time as the infamous
Masamune in Kamakura.

The koshirae (fittings) are certified as Especially Precious by the NBTHK. They include a
black leather wrapped inro-kizami saya and a fuchigashira of shakudo-nanako depicting the
harness and stirrups of a horse (very rare).

Menuki is also made from shakudo and yobori carving of tabanenoshi, a traditional Japanese
design of good fortune and celebration. A vintage round iron tsuba (guard) further
compliments this prized sword from the latter stages of the Japans celebrated period of
Japanese swords - The Kamakura period.





66 (item no. ujka078)
A MORIYUKI KATANA
signed, early muromachi period (oei era: 1394-1427)

Swordsmith: Bishu Osafune Moriyuki (attribution)
Location: Bizen province (Okayama prefecture)
Length: 64.2cm
Curvature: 1.8cm
Jihada: Beautiful Small Tight Itame and Midare-Utsuri from Habaki to Kissaki
Hamon: Gunome-Midare
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

1,111,000 (~$11,694)

First generation Moriyuki flourished during the Nanbokucho period during the Kenmu era
between 1334 and 1338. The signature on the nakago (tang) of the next generation Moriyuki
is on the tachi side, suggesting that this sword might have originally been a kodachi for one-
handed use.

The koshirae's design holds very powerful depictions of waves and dragons, iconic symbols
revered by the Samurai. Even the swords traditional bag design depicts a dragon and
paulownia with gold threading.

A particularly complimentary handachi koshirae (half-tachi) saya is lacqured in black with
scatterings of beautiful mother-of-pearl. Fuchigashira of shakudo continues the theme of
dragons is further signed Seijyo.

There are seven generations of Seijyo dating back from the Keicho period (1596~1615) to
Kaeri (1848~1854). Although it is difficult to determine which generation of metalsmith
created this very set every generation of Seijo metalsmith was held in high regard.

Fine shakudo menuki and a superb iron tsuba carry out the matching dragon and wave theme
in a most inspiring manner. This sword would benefit enormously with a polish that we
can help arrange at a very reasonable price.




76 (item no. ujar007)
A KASUGA DAIMYOJIN KABUTO (samurai helmet)
signed, mid-edo period (~1700s)

Armor Maker: Fujiwara Masamichi
Location: Kept at Kasuga Daimyojin (Kasuga Grand Shrine (|[) in Nara
Hachi (bowl): Shaped similarly to Zenshozan
Included: Vintage kabuto, box, helmet stand, DVD, printed care guide

700,000 (~$7,368)

The marvelous 40-plate kabuto is in the form of helmets that were seen in the Nambokucho
Period (1333-1392) with leather-covered Fukigaeshi that curl elegantly around the piece.

The kabuto is signed (engraved) with the characters (|[ as it was kept at one of the
most famous and prestigious shrines in Japan called Kasuga Daimyojin (Kasuga Grand
Shrine, first established in 768AD). It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Nara, Japan.

Fujiwara Masamichi, the kabuto maker, has signed his name in a black circular formation
(Maruta Magozaemon), over the strikingly red interior.




77 (item no. ujwa102)
A MOROKAGE WAKIZASHI
unsigned, muromachi period (oei era 1394~1427)

Swordsmith: Bizen Osafune Morokage (attribution, o-suriage)
Location: Bizen province (Okayama prefecture)
Length: 44.5cm Curvature: 1.4cm
Hamon: Ko-Gunome-Midare (small circular waves)
Jihada: Itame (whirls of wood grain) with light midare-utsuri (shadow hamon)
Certificate #1: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Certificate #2: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a koshirae (sword fittings) designated as
Important by the Society for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, silk carry bag, sword stand, maintenance kit, DVD,
printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

SOLD

This is a unique 600-year old wakizashi that was once a Naginata (pole arm) attributed to
swordsmith Morokage of the Bizen Kozori School that originated circa 1326. Kozori
means, to gather together. As such, swordsmiths of this Kozori School demonstrate an
independently skilled approach to the art of sword making.

A finely crafted dragon twists and billows its way around the tsuba (guard). This sword has
two certificates of authenticity for both the blade and its koshirae (fittings).



80 (item no. ujta023)
A KUNIHISA TANTO
unsigned, muromachi period (bunmei era 1469~1486)

Swordsmith: Den Uda Kunihisa (attribution)
Location: Musashi Province (Tokyo prefecture)
Length: 25.2cm (ubu nakago)
Hamon: Naka Suguha, good Konie, bright Nioi-kuchi
Jihada: Good and tight Ko-Itame with Jinie
Certificate #1: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Certificate #2: NBTHK Tokubetsu Kicho (a sword koshirae (fiitings) designated as
Especially Precious by the Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and all exportation paperwork

800,000 (~$8,421)

The Uda School in Etchu Province (northern Japan) places its origins from the Uda district of
Yamato (Nara) Province that adhered to the refined Yamato traditions of sword making.

This splendid Uda Kunimune tanto is held in beautiful silver wave fittings that are certified
NBTHK Tokubetsu Kicho. The shakudo nanako menuki represents a carved uryu (dragon).



81 (item no. ujwa095)
A KIYOSADA WAKIZASHI
signed, muromachi period (eiroku era: 1558~1570)

Swordsmith: Nio Kiyosada
Location: Ecchu province (Toyama prefecture)
Length: 51.2cm
Curvature: 0.1cm
Hamon: Naka-Suguha with Nie, Hotsure, Uchinoke and Koashi
Jihada: Good and tight Ko-Itame, Nagareru and Masame-hada, Shirake-Utsuri
Certificate: NBTHK Tokubetsu Kicho (a sword designated as Especially Precious by
the Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

700,000 (~$7,216)

The respected Nio School can trace its origins to the mid-Kamakura Period (~1200s).

The workmanship of the Sue-Nio School of which Nio Kiyosada is a representative smith is
based on suguha (straight temper line) from the Yamato-den. Sue-Tegai and Sue-Mihara
comes to mind when reviewing the characteristics of the finely crafted steel.

All swordsmiths from Nio School use the prefix Kiyo in their names. The two
characters for Nio () on the nakago represent Benevolent Guardian Kings of Buddhism.

Fuchigashira is made out of Shakudo Ishime-ji with the design of pine tree, gold with the
design of Torii (Shinto Shrine Archway) and Takabori Inlay out of Shibuichi.

Shakudo Menuki depicts a falconer. Tsukamaki (hilt wrap) is of beautiful ray skin.

A well-crafted openwork mokko-gata iron tsuba with linear designs rests within a
shu (red) coloured and lacquered saya (scabbard) for luck and good fortune.

Sword comes with Tokubetsu Kicho (Especially Precious) certification from the NBTHK.




82 (item no. ujwa096)
A KANETSUNA WAKIZASHI
unsigned, muromachi period (tenbun era: 1532~1555)

Swordsmith: Noshu Kanetsuna (attribution)
Location: Mino province (Gifu prefecture)
Length: 32.0cm
Curvature: 0.7cm
Hamon: Koshi-biraki and Gunome-Midare
Jihada: Itame
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, silk carry bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

SOLD

This very unique wakizashi can be classified as an extended tanto in a Unokubi-tsukuri (neck
of cormorant construction) with two bo-hi lines running parallel to the blade.

Fuchigashira is made out of Shakudo-Nanako with Gold Takabori with the design of a person
of culture who is reading Chikurinsho (bamboo grove book).

Menuki depicts the Lucky God Hotei's stick and Takarabukuro (treasure bag), which indicates
Rusu-moyo, and a bat. The Kanji for a bat () includes the Kanji of (, representing
happiness.

A small iron tsuba shaped in Mokko-gata with gold and silver inlay depicts of a family of
birds huddled safely under a strong bamboo tree.

The saya is black-lacquered in the form of an Inro (traditional Samurai medicine case).




83 (item no. ujka086)
A MORISHIGE KATANA
unsigned, muromachi period (oei era: 1394~1427)

Swordsmith: Osafune Morishige (attribution)
Location: Bizen province (Okayama prefecture)
Length: 76.0cm (ubu nakago)
Curvature: 2.3cm
Hamon: Ko-Gunome Choji Majiri
Jihada: Itamehada, Kokoro and Utsuri
Certificate: NBTHK Hozon (a sword designated as Worthy of Conservation by the
Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Fujishiro rank: Chu-Koto Chu-Josaku (above average swordsmith in Mid Koto Period)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, sword fabric bag, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

1,500,000 (~$15,625)

Prominent Omiya School in Bizen Osafune has its origins with the swordsmith Kunimori who
founded the line in the middle Kamakura period.

Swordsmiths from this group followed the Soden Bizen tradition, which is a fusion of Bizen and
Soshu sword making. Their best works resemble that of Kanemitsu who was one of
Masamunes ten students and brought this expertise from Kamakura to Bizen province.

The vast majority of swords from the Omiya school are o-suriage (greatly shortened) and
unsigned. Typical lengths are about 62cm long. This particular katana that may very have been
a tachi given its sublime curvature, is a healthy 76cm and in its original shape (ubu, uncut).

Fuchigashira is made out of Shakudo and Takabori Iroe with the design of Samurai riding on a
horse at the Battle of Uji river in 1184 where Minamoto no Yoshinaka tried to wrest power from
his cousins Yoritomo and Yoshitsune, seeking to take command of the Clan.

Gold menuki in the design of a bow and arrow that were typical weapons used at this battle. A
round iron tsuba depicts hills and waters continue the common theme. The Edo-period saya is
dark brown and beautifully lacquered in an ishime-ji finish with its kojiri made of shakudo.




84 (item no. ujwa105)
A YOSHIMICHI GASSAKU WAKIZASHI
signed, edo period (kanbun era: 1661~1672)

Swordsmiths: Front: Yamato no Kami Yoshimichi (|t)
(co-creation) Back: Tanba no Kami Yoshimichi (|t)
Location: Settsu province (Osaka)
Length: 46.8cm
Curvature: 0.7cm
Hamon: (Front, omote): Gunome Midare, Choji Midare, Kobushi Choji Midare
(Back, ura): O-Midare, Sudareba, Tamayaki majiri
Jihada: Good and tight Ko-Itame
Certificate: NBTHK Tokubetsu Kicho (a sword designated as Especially Precious by
the Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Fujishiro rank: Shinto Chu-Josaku (above average swordsmiths in the Early Edo Period)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, sword fabric bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

1,290,000 (~$13,437)

This rare and collectible wakizashi is the collaborative effort of Osaka brothers Yamato no
Kami Yoshimichi and Tanba no Kami Yoshimichi.

Each signed their respective sides of the blade, depicting their unique hamon expertise that
include the iconic sudare-ba (a temper line that resembles a bamboo curtain) that their
ancestry in Kyoto so proudly initiated.

The handsome koshirae fuchigashira is made of shakudo and takabori gold inlay in the design of
dragon. The menuki is gold iroe with a family kamon (crest). Tsuba is formed of iron depicting
Omodaka (threeleaf arrowhead) and a wild goose that representing family bravery.

A kozuka (utility knife) is gilded with pictures of a spear and kabuto (Samurai helmet) is nestled
into a vintage lacquered saya (scabbard) meant for the Samurai daisho.



85 (item no. ujka087)
AN IEMORI KATANA
signed, nambokucho period (oan era: 1368~1374)

Swordsmith: Den Bizen Kozori Iemori (attribution)
Location: Bizen province (Okayama prefecture)
Length: 75.2cm
Curvature: 1.8cm
Hamon: Kozori-like, Ko-Gunome Midare, good Ashi
Jihada: Tight Itame and Utsuri
Certificate #1: NBTHK Hozon (a sword designated as Worthy of Conservation by the
Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Certificate #2: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Fujishiro rank: Chu-Koto Chu-Josaku (an above average swordsmith in Mid Koto Period)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, sword fabric bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

1,900,000 (~$19,587)

What makes the Kozori group of swordsmiths so interesting is that they did not formally
belong to any main school in Bizen province. Their closest ties appear to be with the Kanemistu
School that has its origins from Bizen and Soshu traditions of sword making.

The work of the Kozori smiths illustrates the important transition in which the tachi gradually
changed to a katana. The hamon is also less showy, choosing a subtler wave along the blade.

Given the massive demand for swords during the brutal Nambokucho Period War (1333-1392),
Kozori smiths were called upon to produce swords for the main line smiths of Bizen province.
In a word, they were trusted sub-contractors with their own unique flair.

This brilliantly long katana (read: tachi) is attributed to Iemori by the NBTHK-NPO an
excellent example of swords from 14th century Japan. The NBTHK certificate of authenticity
that also accompanies the sword attributes the sword to purely the Kozori group.

The koshirae is a fine Denchu-zashi (sword made for palace wear) with buffalo horn kashira and a
black-lacquered saya. Fuchi is of Shakudo Nanako and gold Takabori in the design of herons
representing light. Finely carved gold dragons form the menuki and a paulownia leaf tsuba.


86 (item no. ujwa109)
A KANEMICHI WAKIZASHI
signed, edo period (kanbun era: 1661~1672)

Swordsmith: Tango no Kami Kanemichi (|;)
Location: Settsu province (Osaka)
Length: 44.7cm (ubu)
Curvature: 1.2cm
Hamon: Toranba & Gunome Midare
Jihada: Tight Ko-Itame
Certificate #1: NBTHK Koshu Tokubetsu Kicho (a sword designated as
Extraordinarily Precious by the Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Certificate #2: NBTHK Hozon (sword fittings designated as Worthy of Conservation by
the Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Fujishiro rank: Shinto Josaku (a superior swordsmith in Early Edo Period)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, sword fabric bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

930,000 (~$9,687)

In 1593 swordmith Kanemichi, founder of the Mishina School, moved from Seki in
Mino province to Seidonin in Kyoto with his four sons. They are are Iga no Kami Kinmichi,
Echigo no Kami Kinmichi (also known as Rai Kinmichi), Tanba no Kami Yoshimichi and
Etchu no Kami Masatoshi. So starts the prestigious Mishina School.

In Kyoto, Tanba no Kami Yoshimichi (Kyo-Tanba second generation) had two sons. The second
born Yoshimichi decided to expand the school to Osaka in 1625 after he received his title Tango
no Kami. He used the smith name Kanemichi paying homage to his pioneering grandfather.

This magnificent wakizashi carries the honorable distinction of Extraordinarily Precious by the
NBTHK, the iconic blue certificate. The fittings are further certified as Worthy of Conservation.

Fuchi is made out of shakudo nanako with the design of chrysanthemum (imperial symbol) and
an arabesque pattern. The saya is decorated with elegant scatterings of mother-of-pearl inlay.




87 (item no. ujka088)
A NOBUHIDE KATANA
unsigned, late edo period (bunkyu era (1861-1863)

Swordsmith: Den Edo Kurihara Nobuhide (attribution)
Location: Yamashiro province (Kyoto)
Length: 73.3cm (ubu)
Curvature: 1.5cm
Hamon: Yakidaka, Gunome Choji Midare and good Ashi
Jihada: Ko-Itame
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Fujishiro rank: Shinshinto Jojosaku (a highly superior swordsmith in Late Edo Period)
Included: Shirasaya only, sword fabric bag, sword stand, maintenance kit,
DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

1,500,000 (~$15,625)

One of the finest swordsmiths in the Shinshinto period (Late Edo Period), Kurihara Keiji
Nobuhide is regarded as the supreme protg of the infamous swordsmith Kiyomaro.

Born in Echigo province, Nobuhide originally travelled to Kyoto to become a mirror maker.
After a 2-year apprentice with Kiyomaro he struck it out on his own with tremendous success.

Ranked as a highly superior swordsmith by Fujishiro, works by Nobuhide are fondly treasured
in Japan with books dedicated to his work particularly those with horimono (engraving).

This is a fine example of the talent this craftsman commanded a work attributed by the
NBTHK-NPO. Note the grand o-kissaki (tip) of that distinguishes this work of art in steel.




89 (item no. ujka089)
A MASAMORI KATANA
unsigned, muromachi period (tenbun era: 1532~1555)

Swordsmith: Den Bingo Mihara Masamori (attribution)
Location: Bingo province (Hiroshima prefecture)
Length: 67.5cm (suriage) Curvature: 0.7cm
Hamon: Naka Suguha
Jihada: Itame
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, sword fabric bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

SOLD

This is a fine katana attributed to Mihara Masamori from the Hiroshima area of Japan. The
Mihara group of swordsmiths were known for their suguha (straight) hamon skills.

The koshirae (sword fittings) convey a tribute to Japans imperial symbol, the Chrysanthemum.

The saya is elegantly dressed with 16-petal kikumon (chrysanthemum) while the shakudo nanako
fuchigashira displays a takabori carving of chrysanthemum and gold iroe signed by Ishiguro
Masaaki (Kaou). The menuki shows a large hawk representing the importance of keeping ones
talents in reserve. An oversized openwork iron tsuba is decorated in kikumon. The name
Sukenage Shinnou Haitou is on the Kyoto-issued card suggesting it was once a noble kodachi.



90 (item no. ujwa107)
A KUNITOMO WAKIZASHI
signed, muromachi period (tenbun era: 1532~1555)

Swordsmith: Bicchu Jyu Kunitomo (]j[)
Location: Bicchu province (Okayama prefecture)
Length: 52.1cm (suriage) Curvature: 1.6cm
Hamon: Gunome Choji, Yakidaka Kagerouba
Jihada: Tight Itame
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, sword fabric bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

SOLD

Swordsmith Kunitomo from Bicchu province drew his inspiration from the great swords of the
Bizen Fukuoka Ichimonji School. This lovely wakizashi has a hamon that reminds one of power
and majesticness of rolling waves in the ocean. Look for the choji (cloves) within the hamon too.

The hachu has kinsen (bolts of lightning) and midare utsuri (wavy shadow) along the blade. The
hamon is almost identical to National Treasure smith Yoshifusa from the Kamakura period.

Thekoshirae is meant for palace wear or denchuzashi koshirae. The kashira is made from horn and
the polished fuchi (collar) made of shakudo and gold takabori carries the design of Go San no Kiri
Family crest that the Toyotomi family made famous. The tsuba is formed of pure shakudo and its
decorative border is made out of shinchu with the signature of Edo Periods Nagayoshi-san.


92 (item no. ujwa108)
A YOSHITAKE WAKIZASHI
signed, edo period (tenna era: 1681~1683)

Swordsmith: Izumo Daijyo Fujiwara no Yoshitake (,]]]t,)
Location: Edo province (Tokyo)
Length: 55.6cm (ubu)
Curvature: 0.9cm
Hamon: Gunome Midare with Nie, Ashi
Jihada: Good Ko-Itame with Jinie
Certificate: NBTHK Hozon (a sword designated as Worthy of Conservation by the
Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Fujishiro rank: Shinto Josaku (a superior swordsmith in the Early Edo Period)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, sword fabric bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

1,000,000 (~$10,204)

Son of Horikawa Kunitake and a pupil of Horikawa Kunihiro - one the grandmaster swordsmiths
in the Shinto Period - Horikawa Yoshitake who moved from Kyoto to Tokyo was initially titled
Izumo no Daijo and later Izumo no Kami (Lord of Izumo province).

Given such illustrious pedigree and a penchant for producing fabulous blades it comes as no
surprise that Fujishiro ranked Yoshitake as Josaku (a superior swordsmith in the Edo period.)

This o-wakizashi (long wakizashi) is blessed with a classic gunome midare hamon (wavy temper
line) with fine nie (visible crystals) and ashi (legs) that extend to the cutting edge. Yoshitake
was more known for producing katanas, so this wakizashi is rather special indeed.

The completely eye-catching antique saya (scabbard) is wrapped and polished in the skin of a
ray fish. Fuchigashira is of shakudo nanako and gold inlay in the design of the much-adored tsuru
(crane) representing good fortune and life longetivy.

[Goto school] menuki and the sword bag continue the theme of cranes, Japans national bird.
The uniquely designed iron tsuba is comprised of a chrysanthemum and a beloved sakura.




94 (item no. ujar008)
A MARUGAME CLAN SET OF ARMOR
early edo period (17
th
century)

Kabuto (Samurai helmet): Acorn shaped Deer horn maedate (decorative crest) with Nichirin
Menpou (mask): Resseihou with a mustache. Retractable nose.

Yoroi (armor): Navy colored Odoshi Mogamido Gusoku (Armor)
Do (Body): Iron with black leather and black lacquered. Kusazuri is gold lacquered fixed with
leather. Removable.

Sode (shoulder): Tosei Sode comprised of leather with black and gold lacquer
Kote (glove-like sleeves): Ozasa made of iron with gold lacquered with chain connections

1,800,000 (~$18,750)

In the 18th year of Kanei (1641), Ieharu Yamazaki from Tomioka, Higo no Kuni (Amakusa,
Kumamoto prefecture) came and established the Marugame clan.

The clan lasted for three generations. Takakazu Kyogoku from Tatsuno, Harima no Kuni
having 60000 koku took over until the Meiji period.

The Marugame kamon (family crest) on the box of armour strongly suggests this fine set of
armour belonged to Yamazaki family of the Marugame clan.



96 (item no. ujka095)
A YOSHIMITSU KATANA
unsigned, muromachi period (kansho era: 1461~1466)

Swordsmith: Bizen Osafune Yoshimitsu (attribution)
Location: Bizen province (Okayama prefecture)
Length (ubu): 67.2cm
Curvature: 1.5cm
Hamon: Notare and Gunome Choji Midare
Jihada: Tight Itame
Engraving: Tokko ken , Bonji () Gomabashi , Bonji ()
Certificate: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae, shirasaya, sword fabric bags, sword stand,
maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

1,100,000 (~$11,340)

Yoshimitsu is a notable name of the Bizen tradition, particularly during the Muromachi period.

This katana delights in being of original (ubu) length with a classic wavy gunome choji hamon
(clove blossoms).

Well-made engravings that bring good fortune on either side of the blade give the sword
character and providence.

It is said that a sword fitted in a red saya (scabbard) is forever sharp and special.

Koshirae (fitting) elements:
Fuchi (collar): Iron and Dragon Gold Takabori (high relief carving)
Kashira (pommel): Crafted from buffalo horn
Menuki (eyelets): In the design of Omodaka (plants growing in paddy fields)
Tsuba (guard) Of iron with double Masu (square wooden box to measure rice),
Sukashi open work
Saya (scabbard: Shu (lacquered in red)



97 (item no. ujwa116)
A SADAYUKI WAKIZASHI
signed, edo period (jyoou era: 1652~1654)

Swordsmith: Fujiwara Sadayuki (]],)
Location: Bungo province (Oita prefecture)
Length (ubu): 39.3cm
Curvature: 0.9cm
Hamon: Wide Suguha and Notare, Kuichigai-ba, Koashi, and Yo
Jihada: Tight Ko-Itame, Nagare, Midare Utsuri on Shinogi
Certificate: NBTHK Hozon (a sword designated as Worthy of Conservation by the
Society for the Preservation of the Japan Art Sword)
Included: Vintage koshirae in horse theme, shirasaya, sword fabric bags, sword
stand, maintenance kit, DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

990,000 (~$10,206)

Attention horse lovers and those born (and to be born) in the Year of the Horse (1955, 1967,
1979, 1991, 2003, 2015)!

A lovely signed wakizashi by Fujiwara Sadayuki in shobu-zukuri shape (iris-leaf construction)
with a gentle waving hamon. Sword is complimented with an exquisite set of fittings in the
theme of a horse. Collectively, this is a unique piece of Japanese art.

Horses have always played a trusted role in the servitude of the Samurai. They carry with them
notable power, beauty,
grace and nobility.


(From left to right):
Tsuba (guard)
Kashira (pommel)
Menuki (eyelets)






98 (item no. ujwa114)
A MUNEMICHI WAKIZASHI
unsigned, edo period (kanbun era: 1661~1673)

Swordsmith: Kazusa no Kami Munemichi (attribution)
Location: Echizen no Kuni (Fukui prefecture)
Length (ubu): 56.3cm
Curvature: 1.1cm
Hamon: Togari Gunome and Sanbonsugi (three peak cedar)
Jihada: Ko-Itame
Nakago: Ubu-nakago, Iriyamagata, Kakumune and Sujikai Yasuri
Certificate #1: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a sword designated as Important by the Society
for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Certificate #2: NTHK-NPO Kanteisho (a koshirae (sword fittings) designated as
Important by the Society for the Preservation of the Japanese Sword)
Fujishiro rank: Shinto Chu-Josaku (above average swordsmith in the Early Edo Period)
Included: Vintage koshirae, sword fabric bag, sword stand, maintenance kit,
DVD, printed care guide, registration and export paperwork

525,000 (~$5,357)

Fujishiro describes swordsmith Kazusa no Kami Munemichi works as being exuberant.
Well, this extra long o-wakizashi happily displays such exuberance!

The hamon (temper line) is a creative mixture of a wavy gunome and sanbonsugi, which is a
rhythmic pattern depicting three cedar trees. 16th century smith Kanemoto of the Mino
tradition is attributed to having pioneered this iconic temper line.

The Edo-period koshirae is a pleasing collection of a 24-petal chrysanthemum iron tsuba with
unique bow and arrows for menuki. Two NTHK-NPO certificates accompany the sword, enjoy!


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