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Client Summary Report

Brain Injury Association Donna Thomson

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

Completed By: Priya Das Elaine Cabrera Sophie Fretwell Sarah Johnson

Fanshawe College - Trends & Technology in P.R. Major Project Professor: Geoff Evans (geoff@socialmediacoach.ca)

CONTENTS
BRAIN INJURY ASSOCIATION LONDON

1.
A. B. C. D. E. F.

SUMMARY/ ORGANIZATION OVERVIEW


Summary of Organization Organizations Primary Tribe Current Communication Strategies & Challenges Goals for Social Media Critical Success Dependencies Overall Summation

2.

BUSINESS GOALS IN ACTION

A. Summary of Primary Platforms B. Secondary Platform Considerations C. Importance & Purpose of Developing Social Media Themes D. Content Themes Identified E. Topic Types within Content Themes F. Key Voice Characteristics G. Sample Optimized Posts

3.

CRISIS MANAGEMENT PROCESS

A. Summary of Decision-Makers & Respective Roles B. Step-by-Step Crisis Management Plan Summation

Client Summary Report

Brain Injury Association

Trends & Tech 2013

Summary of your organization Since 1982, Brain Injury Association of London and Region have helped to maximize the quality of life for individuals affected by brain injury. This organization focuses on their four pillars, education, support, advocacy and increasing public awareness. The association consists of both community members and professionals, and continually growing and expanding their resources to better assist those affected by brain injury, and to prevent brain injury through education. Summary of your organizations primary tribe (and the purpose for building a tribe-based online community) The primary tribe for the Brain Injury Association of London and Region are those who have sustained a brain injury and those who offer support, mainly family members of survivors. This organization also that their audience stems to professionals such as doctors and lawyers. The majority of their audiences live in London Ontario, as other organizations are offered in various other areas. The Brain Injury Association of London and Region use an online community mainly to share times and dates of when support groups and meetings are being held. This is a way for those living with the injury to connect to others in a similar situation and find support. This organization also uses their online community to raise awareness about their cause and ask for support during their fundraisers. The Brain Injury Association of London and Region share photos, articles, an online newsletter, meeting times and upcoming events. Summary of current communication strategies and challenges The Brain Injury Association of London and Region said that they currently use Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, and their own publication called The Monarch as their communication strategy. The organization is very comfortable using Facebook and Twitter but feel that other use of social media is hard to link back to their organization; for example Instagram, the organization claimed it would be hard to post appropriate content. Another challenge that the Brain Injury Association of London and Region said they struggle with is being able to share interesting content, as much of it can be repetitive and depressing. Summary of organizational goals for social media The Brain Injury Association of London and Region said that the main goal for their organization is to raise public awareness about living with brain injuries. This organization uses their four pillars, education, support, advocacy and increasing public awareness to promote information about living with the injury. The Brain Injury Association of London and Region said that they are trying to rebrand themselves for the New Year to hopefully increase their audience. Their goal is to increase their number of volunteers, which will allow them to provide a greater experience on a day-to-day basis and help those living with the injury. Using social media makes it possible to reach a larger audience and create more public awareness about this cause.

Client Summary Report

Brain Injury Association

Trends & Tech 2013

Summary of critical success dependencies The Brain Injury Association of London and Region said that their success is dependent on the events that the organization puts on throughout the year, for example their Casino Night that is held each year. To make these events a success it is critical that all tickets are sold to raise enough money to keep the organization running effectively. It is equally important to have enough volunteers helping to make these events a success, as this organization does not receive any outside funding. Overall summary outlining how recommended social media strategy would impact organizational objectives: The Brain Injury Association of London and Region is not comfortable using certain forms of social media, for example Instagram. It is important to use social media well, and not use it just because it exists. Posting and sharing relevant content to the organization in a way that relates to their audience and generates awareness is the main goal. Sharing information about their events in a way that generates knowledge and excitement will increase their ticket sales, volunteers and followers that will make this organization a greater success. An example of one strategy that the Brain Injury Association of London and Region could use to generate awareness would be if someone living with the injury creates a blog and shares information about their daily life. This would be an interesting way to create further insight about living with the injury and increase more empathy. Using this example could help to create more awareness about the organization and in return generate more volunteers and ticket sales which is one of their main goals. Business Goals in Action: Primary recommended platforms to reach your tribe: 1. Facebook 2. Blog 3. Website Summary of each primary platforms features & benefits that will help your organization achieve its overall social media strategy: 1. Facebook is one of the most popular social media outlets appropriate for the Brain Injury Association. The cover photo on our Facebook page features four different pillars that send out important messages towards our audience. Each pillar consists of support, education, public awareness and advocacy. The features of these four pillars are colour coded into the same colours as the company logo and profile picture, which is the monarch butterfly. The benefits of having the monarch as the company logo helps represent change. Since our audience is mostly focused on brain injury victims, its important to encourage that there is help for not only them, but for their family members as well. When someone is loved and gets hurt, it hurts the family too. The benefits of having these four pillars (which we will get into later on in the document) are to inspire positivity during the recovery process and for the rest of their lives. Our Facebook page is an open door policy, meaning you can ask questions or share concerns Client Summary Report Brain Injury Association Trends & Tech 2013

at any given time. With this open door policy, it helps our guests feel comfortable and satisfied that we are always going to be here to help and respond quickly to the posts. Facebook is the newest brain therapy. Most people involved with brain injury rehabilitation know that a brain injury has a terrible effect on a persons social life. After the injury, its much harder to get out and meet people, and so it becomes even more challenging to maintain old relationships and create new ones. Social networking might play an important role in the recovery of our social lives following injury. People with traumatic brain injury are already using Facebook, Twitter, and other sites to supplement their social lives, and theyre doing it largely without professional help. With brain injury, victims are no longer capable of holding a full-time position; social networking has kept these victims connected to the outside world and relationships. 2. Blogging can be an interesting way to communicate with different audiences on the Internet. Blogging tends to be focused on a more personal approach, with an easy-going, or informative feel. Our organization could benefit from blogging in order to inform publics of agendas within events our organization hosts, or participates in, offering an insider perspective on the program, success and weaknesses, and how others can get involved. Blogging also can be used to describe the four pillars in detail. Using the pillars as themes, blogs can be created in order to promote awareness, educate readers, show support through sponsors and donors, as well as advocate for fellow organizations and those living with brain injuries. Allowing others who are involved in non-profit work, or have a personal connection to brain injury, provides the opportunity to understand what living with a brain injury actually entails, and ways they can assist or volunteer their time with our organization. Instead of shortening posts for social media platforms such as Facebook, and Twitter, in depth conversations can take place on a blogging forum. Blogging can link to the organizations contacts in social media, and their main website information as well, to remain constant among all platforms. 3. The BIA website has all the information you need to know about the association and what it provides. In the about us section of the website, it teaches readers a long history of the association and how it got started. There is a timeline from 1982 and on that shows the changes of the association itself, overall purpose and goals, and to the services provided. The four pillars (support, education, advocacy and public awareness) are on the website for viewers to read and understand what each pillar represents. The website also has links to the Brain Injury Associations most popular social media outlets such as Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube and Twitter. All the social media outlets provide even further information that the website may not have shared. On the home page of the website, there is a did you know slide. The slide provides statistics, how you can support donations, sponsors, and volunteering. All of these resources link on how you can get started and become a part of the BIA. In the how to help section of the website, it is shared that this is an association which does not receive any public funding to do all of the work that we do. It relies on most of the topics shared on the slide of the homepage (volunteers, sponsorships, fundraising, donations etc.). In the same section, you can make a donation in the comfort of your own home and also read about fundraising events and how you can be involved in them. The Monarch logo is represented on each page as you browse through the website with a border background the same colour as the butterfly, keeping the same colour scheme throughout the website. Text headers are the same colour as the border background but the content remains black. In the whats new section of the website, you can read about survivor voices, family & friends, how professionals can submit an article on family life and brain Client Summary Report Brain Injury Association Trends & Tech 2013

injury. You can contact the association by phone, email or go right to office and meet with somebody; it is a very open and friendly atmosphere. Secondary platform consideration 1. Social Media (Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube) Summary of secondary platforms potential purpose and role within your organizations overall social media strategy The purpose of the social media components of the Brain Injury Association of London & Region is to promote their four pillars of education about their organization, and brain injury itself to an appropriate audience varying from all ages. As we have become aware, social media is popular among teenagers, and young adults, as well as business professionals. In order to maintain a good connection to their tribe, utilizing social media can administer information about brain injuries, campaigns occurring within the organization itself, as well as events in the surrounding community. Currently, the Brain Injury Association of London & Region promotes their events, stories regarding living with brain injury, helmet information for their Helmets on Kids program, as well as support with fellow brain injury non-profit organizations. Summary of the importance and purpose of developing themes for social media participation It is important to develop themes for social media participation so we stay current throughout all forms of communication. By maintaining strict guidelines of promoting the four pillars of our organization, we can gain better ground through our rebranding process, allowing the public to view us through those main areas that set our organization apart from others. Through a strong, and informative voice, promoting advocacy, support, education, and awareness through our social media outlets (Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Facebook and The Monarch), we offer the public a new perspective on those living under the affects of a brain injury. Our fifth theme of the monarch sets our organization apart by its logo and colours. The colours of the monarch are incorporated into how the organization describes itself. The monarch also represents a change in one life to the next, which ties into the theme of brain injury quite well. Our organization is well known for its butterfly logo, and by tying in that theme to all aspects of communication it allows them to remain relevant in the public eye of associating the monarch with the organization. Over-arching content themes identified (5 unique themes): 1. Twitter 2. LinkedIn 3. YouTube 4. Facebook 5. The Monarch

Client Summary Report

Brain Injury Association

Trends & Tech 2013

Summary of the types of topics that would be addressed within each content theme: By appealing to audiences with facts about their organization, safety in prevention of injury, and events that promote awareness, and volunteerism, Twitter is a quick way to keep audiences informed of the services the organization provides. Twitter can be used for twoway communication between audiences who reply to tweets, and the education can be shared further. This platform assists our organization by spreading public awareness in a technology-savvy culture. It allows audiences to think informatively about the organization itself, and ways to stay safe, or become educated on brain injuries through quick tweets on a timely basis, available for on-the-go life. Currently, our organizations Twitter is linked to Facebook, so posts are shared equally through each platform. LinkedIn is connected to Executive Director, Donna Thompsons personal account. They use this platform to connect to fellow non-profit organizations, and certain clients that can be valuable sponsors, or connections in terms of event planning, and donations. Our organization understands the platforms value, but finds it tricky since it is connected to Donnas personal contacts as well as the organizations. YouTube has not been used by our organization in nine months. It advertised helmet safety, support groups, and testimonials. This platform can be utilized more through internal communications through short videos of awareness, or event promotion. Events can be advertised through info graphics, or video call to action as well as print. Events can also be filmed internally by staff, and posted to YouTube on a later date summarizing the success. Facebook is the most popular social media outlet in our organization. We have 449 followers and 20 people talking about our organization. We are always active on updating our content on a weekly bases and sharing different information almost everyday. We like to posts our upcoming events and address volunteers to come and be involved. Posts that raise awareness on our Facebook page usually consist of things not to say to someone with a brain injury, support group information, events that are arriving or friendly reminders of upcoming sponsorships. The monarch butterfly represents a change from one to the next. This is a crucial representation of brain injury. Those living with a brain injury have survived from their accident, and now have to adapt to a new way of life. Butterflies symbolize a transformation and metamorphosis in life; they represent renewal and rebirth. Another meaning for the butterfly is to find the joy in life and lightness of being. Through development, butterflies emphasize the ability to move from one state to another. Summary of your organizations key voice characteristics for the creation of posts and engagement of tribe members via social media channels Our organizations voice varies on different social media channels. When using LinkedIn, the Brain Injury Association wishes to remain professional, and to the point with any form of communication. On Twitter, they approach their audience positively, with interesting facts about awareness. Similarly, they stay positive and promote educational awareness on Facebook as well. Our organization has explained their voice as strong, but sturdy. They promote the main points and facts, without overwhelming their audience with lengthy posts. Through the use of YouTube, their voice could remain positive and informative through videos, and graphics, maintaining an interesting atmosphere among all age groups. Client Summary Report Brain Injury Association Trends & Tech 2013

Sample optimized posts for each recommended primary and secondary platform (5 samples per platform addressing each of the individual themes PLUS 3 sample blogs.) Posts for Facebook Page: 1. Support- If someone you love has experienced a Brain Injury, you may benefit from participating in one of our many support groups. We offer resource materials, peer mentoring, and a quarterly journal (The Monarch). We hold annual conferences, provide public awareness presentations, and publish a brain injury services directory. 2. Education- We have informative topics presented by knowledgeable speakers and elaborate exhibits, guests learn tips and trends that can help them live their everyday lives. Our Annual Brain Injury Conference every year lends the opportunity for professionals to network, and family members and survivors to get to know one another. We also offer a brain Basics Training Program, a program designed t provide frontline Health Care Workers, Caregivers and others with a readily understandable introduction to the world of brain Injury. In order to understand the importance of the strategies that might work with someone with an ABI one must first understand the nature and complexity of Acquired Brain Injury. 3. Public Awareness- Presentations are offered throughout the five counties on several topics related to the effects of brain injury, prevention strategies including helmet fitting training and clinics. The Association purchases bicycle helmets that are available for a donation at the many exhibits that staff and volunteers attend. We offer helmets to those who may not have finances to purchase one. We have a program called Helmets on Kids Partnership. Its a collaboration of several community partners with the sole purpose of putting a helmet on the head of every child in the London region who needs one. The program also offers educational material. 4. Advocacy- Our association strives to assist survivors, family & caregivers with complex issues by offering them a place to turn for answers to their questions, guidance in location appropriate services, information about ABI, housing, rehabilitation programs, and financial programs. 5. The Monarch Magazine- The Monarch magazine is issued every four months with newly added content and facts. The issue of The Monarch provides helpful information on Social Isolation after ABI, which is frequently cited as one of the most troubling issues brain injury survivors face. The four pillars as mentioned frequently are also represented within the magazine as their table of contents. They share information about the association, board of directors, memberships, support groups, annual conferences, legal guides and upcoming events and many more.

Client Summary Report

Brain Injury Association

Trends & Tech 2013

Sample Blog Posts 1. Facts and Symptoms of Brain Injury Brain injury, also called acquired brain injury, is any damage to the brain affecting a person physically, emotionally or behaviorally. Brain injuries can happen at birth, or later, from an illness or a trauma, and are called either traumatic or non-traumatic, depending on the specific cause. Physical symptoms of brain injuries include the following: Headaches Difficulty coordinating balance Blurred vision in one or both eyes Milder vision problems Seizures Changes in sensory perception Trouble speaking and swallowing Changes in sleep patterns Lack of bowel and bladder control Changes in sexual function Motor impairment (trouble moving body normally) Functional and Emotional changes caused by brain injury include: Personality changes Difficulty forming sentences or choosing vocabulary Confusion Trouble communicating Difficulty with reason, focus and logic Memory impairments Depression Poor concentration Mood swings Limited attention span Disorientation Difficulty remembering conversations/forgetfulness Acting inappropriately Please feel encouraged to share details about your loved one with medical staff so they can get a sense of his or her intellect, behaviour around people, and the things he or she liked to do before the injury/diagnosis. This information will be useful during the trauma care stay and later rehabilitation process to help reestablish the persons life. 2. Annual Conference Each year, the Brain Injury Association of London & Region holds a conference to help educate survivors and family members. Between talented speakers and elaborate exhibits, guests learn tips and trends that can help them live their everyday lives. The conference also lends the opportunity for professionals to network, family members and survivors to get to know one another in a laidback, exciting environment.

Client Summary Report

Brain Injury Association

Trends & Tech 2013

This past June, the Brain Injury Association of London & Region hosted its sixteenth Annual Conference, entitled Falling Through The Cracks. The Annual Conference not only provides speakers and discussions on hot topics in the industry, but it also brings together leaders whose knowledge and experience you can tap into for the benefit of your business. Take advantage of the education and networking opportunities available to a wide spectrum of professionals, from entry-level to middle, and senior management. The schedule of events took place from 7:30 A.M. until 4:00 P.M., complete with exhibits to view, guest speakers, and discussions surrounding brain injury and working together to improve individuals futures. Special thanks goes out to our speakers, Judy Gargaro, Omer Vandevyvere, Aaron Prevost, Matthew Villeneuve, Michelle McIntyre, Terry McGurk, Brandon Agnew, Jenn Martin, Bob LaBrecque, and Glenn Warren for donating their time and expertise at our event! Registration for the conference can be performed online directly from our website, through a secure account information page, which will then direct you to a PayPal page to complete your transaction. 3. Peer Support Mentoring Program Our peer support-mentoring program offers an additional resource to those experiencing the effects of brain injury and the resulting life changes. There are opportunities for both those adjusting to the effects of brain injury in their lives, and those who wish to offer help and support through sharing of their experience. For both survivors and their family members, the peer-mentoring program offers an alternative and much needed form of support. You are partnered with a fellow survivor or family member who has experienced a similar situation first-hand and is empathetic to your frustration. Mentoring takes place over the phone, focusing on discussion and resolution (where possible) of particular problems or issues. The peer support-mentoring program partners up a survivor or their family member with a volunteer who is a fellow survivor/family member. The volunteer has first-hand experience with the particular issues, having experienced a similar situation and is empathetic towards their frustration. As a peer mentor, you would communicate by phone and discuss (or resolve where possible) particular problems or issues, becoming an additional resource for support and education for those adjusting to the effects of ABI. Mentors have been trained to offer a listening ear as you sort through the effects of ABI on your life, share their experience in coping with injury, share strategies and resources that worked for them, and support you while you figure out the strategies that might help you. The Peer Support Program is open to all adults (16 years or older) who have sustained a brain injury, or their family members. For more information on how to find a mentor, contact Jamie Fairles, Peer Support Coordinator.

Client Summary Report

Brain Injury Association

Trends & Tech 2013

Website

Posts for 3rd primary platform

1. About us- Learn about the history of the BIA and how it has become really successful over the years in a time line format. We share information about the board of directors, which is managed by 12 members as well as a number of standing committees. This page shares how you can help be a part of the association without using public funding, you can do so by volunteering, sponsoring, fundraising and donating. We cooperate with other agencies attempting to ensure an optimum level of service to persons with brain injuries in particular and to disable persons in general. 2. Workshops- Workshops are offered throughout the year on various topics surrounding brain injury. These exciting half-day workshops help to keep health professionals up to date on current research in the field of brain injury as well as information financial programs or the impact legislation may have on their clients. 3. Volunteer- Volunteers are by far one of the greatest assets to any organization and the Brain Injury Association of London and Region is absolutely no exception. The BIA has strived to support individuals living with the effects of brain injury to maximize their quality of life whether it has been in the capacity of advocacy and support, or providing resources, educational awareness campaigns, forums and effective programming. The reality is, that with a staff of one and a five county area to serve, the Association truly would not be able to be there to support those who need our serves without our volunteers. Volunteerism truly touches almost every aspect of the Association. 4. Events- Members can receive email updates and view events on a calendar to be a part of support group meetings, committee meetings and events coming up. Also listed under this section is a list of archived events from the past, which you can read about when and where the event took place. Support group meetings can take place in the Elgin County, Huron County, London & Middlesex County, Oxford Country and Perth County. The most popular event is the annual gala, which 300 guests appear including survivors, service providers, family, caregivers, and lawyers. The event includes a dinner, dance, guest speakers, silent and live auctions at the London Convention Centre. Another popular even is the Annual Brain Injury Golf Classic; a day filled with fun, great food and prizes for 144 golfers of all skill levels. Its a great opportunity for those working in the brain injury field to network with colleagues while enjoying a day out on the links. This event takes place at Greenhills Golf & Country Club. 5. The Brain Injury Association along with the Ontario Trial Lawyers Association started Helmets On Kids- Helmets on Kids Community Partnership in 2002. Since its first event, held here in London, this initiative has disturbed more than 15,000 helmets to students. This program is intended to put a helmet on the head of every child who needs one, and provides education and awareness about bicycle helmet use. In addition, the program also includes a videotape presentations and educational material for distribution at local schools. Local members of the OTLA generously give their time and money to both organize these community partnerships and fund the cost of the bike helmets.

Client Summary Report

Brain Injury Association

Trends & Tech 2013

Posts for secondary platform 1. Twitter Brain Injury London @BrainInjuryON Reminder: The Huron Support Group will meet tonight. 7:00-9:00pm at the Huronview Home for the Aged. Generously sponsored by Siskinds. 2. Twitter Brain Injury London @BrainInjuryON Check out this radio station that discusses brain injury specific topics! http://fb.me/2vA3WX8iN 3. LinkedIn

Client Summary Report

Brain Injury Association

Trends & Tech 2013

4. YouTube Success at the Annual Casino Night A big thank you to everyone who made our 6th Annual Casino Night a tremendous success! (Info graphic measurement, photos from the event, video footage of the night, and a thank you to all sponsors) 5. YouTube Brain Injury Support Group Brain Injury Association of London & Region recognizes Bonnie who is stepping down from Leadership in Oxford County after 12 years of service. (Staff testimonial with informative education on the support group offered to those living with the affects of a brain injury) Crisis Management Process: Summary of decision-makers and their respective roles: In the event of a social media crisis, Stephanie McGill and Donna Thomson would be the primary handlers of the issue. Ms. McGill is the BIA Social Media Specialist and Ms. Thompson is the Executive Director of the organization. Both McGill and Thomson would be responsible for identifying the crisis. In order to create a plan to address and resolve the crisis, the entire team at the Brain Injury Association would be consulted. The next step, developing and communication a response to concerned clients and partners would be the responsibility of Ms. Thomson, who would follow the communication policy to do so. In monitoring and aggregating questions or concerns, Ms. McGill and Ms. Thomson would collaborate. After consulting the BIA Code of Conduct and Ethics model, Ms. McGill and Ms. Thomson would determine when the crisis has been resolved. Therefore, Donna Thomson and Stephanie McGill would be the key online advocates who would help spread your message during a crisis. Client Summary Report Brain Injury Association Trends & Tech 2013

The size of the crisis would play a key role in the delegation of roles to deal with the crisis. Ms. McGill and Ms. Thomson would handle a small crisis. If a large-scale crisis were to transpire, Ms. Thomson, backed by the BIA would serve as the official spokesperson to the news media. Were this to occur, Ms. Thomson would emphasize greatly on the four pillars upheld by the Brain Injury Association: support, education, advocacy and awareness. Step-by-step crisis management plan summary: The Brain Injury Association avoids posting any strong opinions in order to remain a neutral organization. The BIA takes a politically impartial stance as they eschew posting or taking a stance on policy debate or party rivalry. In terms of relevant policy changes, the Brain Injury Association maintains a positive outlook on by law and policy alterations. The organization focuses on the output of valuable information that could concern their clientele. The Brain Injury Associate chooses to take action by launching awareness campaigns as opposed to protest-like demonstrations. This strategy has been emplaced to circumvent a scandal. As articulated by both Ms. Thompson and Ms. McGill, worries of negative feedback or press through social media are the two worst-case scenarios. A client or ex client who spreads slurs regarding BIA events would exemplify a social media crisis. If an individual were to post extremely negative content concerning the BIA, such as an insult to a BIA staffer would categorize as a crisis. Although it is a rarity, ex-Brain Injury Association clientele may hold a vendetta against the organization, and could take negative action, hurting the BIA. These ex clients are often under a lot of stress because of their injury, and this could result in lashing out against the Brain Injury Association. In order to insure that the staff member are safe, and that they have no done anything wrong to provoke this type of scandal, BIA staff must maintain accountability and transparency to its organization and management. To maintain accountability, staff must not post personal photos and stories about clientele, at least not without first asking for consent. Online monitoring of the Brain Injury Association brand occurs through a vetting of Facebook, Twitter, and website posts. This is the responsibility of Stephanie McGill. However, it is difficult for Ms. McGill to monitor everything that is being said via Facebook, as she can only view tags of the Brain Injury Association. The Brain Injury Association has expressed its concern regarding a lack of manpower to be able to vet all social media commentary.

Client Summary Report

Brain Injury Association

Trends & Tech 2013