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Lander University Teacher Education Lesson Plan Template

Rev. 2013

Teacher Candidate: Sabrina Cheek Subject/Grade: World History/9th grade

Lesson #8 (Chapter 16.4) Time Allotted: 5 days (March 24-28)

Learning Objective: After taking notes on a PowerPoint lecture, looking at a biography, two primary source activities, and a Youtube video, students will be able to fill in an outline of the information as well as make a map of the Columbian Exchange and the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. Alignment with Standards: EEDA Standard(s): Government and Public Administration SSCA Element(s): Students will understand how some African rulers pushed to end the Trans-Atlantic Slave trade because of what it was doing their Africa nations. Common Core Standards: (3) Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them. We will look at the Columbian Exchange and its impact on America and Europe. NCSS Standards: (9) Global Connections: Students will understand how America, Africa, and Europe connect through the Columbian Exchange and the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. SC State Standards: MWH- 1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the major factors that facilitated exchanges among groups of people and how exchanges influenced those people in the fourteenth and the fifteenth centuries. MWH-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the benefits and costs of the growth of kingdoms into empires from the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries. MWH-4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the conflicts of the seventeenth and the eighteenth centuries in Europe, America, Africa, and Asia. o SC State Indicator: MWH-1.1: Describe the diffusion of people and goods between Europe, Asia, and Africa during the fourteenth and the fifteenth centuries to show the networks of economic interdependence and cultural interactions. MWH-2:6: Describe the impact of the competition among European countries on the various kingdoms of the Americas and Africa, including the Columbian Exchange and the slave trade. MWH-4.7: Explain the disruption within West African kingdoms as a result of the competition between European countries over slave trade. Developmental Appropriateness or Cross-curricular connections: The learning objective is appropriate for this lesson because it meets the standards placed by the SC Department of Education. Students are also able to complete activities that will benefit them in retaining the information. This lesson also incorporates Common Core Standards with the usage of answering questions to a primary source activity.

Lander University Teacher Education Lesson Plan Template

Rev. 2013

Assessment(s) of the Objectives:


Lesson Objective(s) Assessment(s) of the Objective(s) Pre-Assessment: Students will complete bell ringers each day pertaining to the information learned on the previous day or will be learning on that day. (Refer to the Procedures) During-Assessment: Students will complete the notes outline given to them by the instructor. Students will also answer questions to biographies and primary sources. Post-Assessment: Students will complete a map of the Columbian Exchange and the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. Use of Formative Assessment The information presented will be used to determine if students are retaining the information.

After taking notes on a PowerPoint lecture, looking at a biography, two primary source activities, students will be able to fill in an outline of the information as well as make a map of the Columbian Exchange and the TransAtlantic Slave Trade.

Accommodations:
Students will be given an outline for note taking. Student will be given 3 extra days to complete the map activity.

Activity Analysis:
The first activity that students will complete will be the table on the Columbian Exchange. It is important for students to see how the past has affected us now. Students will understand what the Exchange was and what goods were passed from America to Europe. This will help students not think in presentism but will help them to imagine how it was when the goods were first exchanged and the impact it had on European populations. The second activity will be a map activity. This is useful so that students have a visual aid of the goods that were passed. Students will be able to create the map so they will also have to know where continents are. This is extremely useful for the students to learn about geography. The students have been having a hard time telling me where countries and continents are so I feel a map activity will be extremely useful for them.

References: Inc., P. E. (2008). World History: Connections to Today. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall.