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February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

The Jumping Frog Investigation


Variables Used During the Investigation:
M= Minimum Number of Moves
R= Red Frogs
G= Green Frogs
N= Number of Frogs on Each Side
Introduction
In this Investigation, We are needed to play around with a game related to
frogs. In this game each player is needed to succeed by getting the red frogs
(on the left hand-side) and green frogs (on the right hand-side) to the opposite
side by the usage of the lilies. There are two rules to successfully do so such
as, Red frogs can only move to the right and Green frogs to the left, They can
only move one at a time with either a jump or a step. Secondly, A frog can only
jump over another frog that is of another colour, once it jumps it goes on an
empty space near the frog it has jumped over. In this investigation I have used
the game in order to help me make tables to help find out the final formulae.
The Final Formulae must be found to answer the main question asked in the
investigation which was, 72 green frogs sit on their stepping stones in a row
to the left and 64 red frogs sit on their stepping stones in a row to the right
with one stepping stone/Lille between them. How many moves will it take for
the green and red frogs to change sides if they follow the rules laid out
below?

Strategy
I came to decide that it would be would be easier to solve the frog problem by
categorizing my data into three different categories because than it would
make it easier for me to find my information faster and can help me with
avoiding confusion. I decided to categorize my data into the three categories,
which were Equal Number of Red Frogs and Green Frogs, Different Number of
Red Frogs and Different Number of Green Frogs.

For Each Of the Categories I tried at least 5 or more attempts, as it would


demonstrate the pattern clearly and would help me find out the formula for
the frog problem. For Each Attempt that was give I put only one Lillie in
between in of the two sides somewhat like this:
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February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

I decided not to put more than one Lillie in-between of the two sides because
the final question needed to be answered stated 72 green frogs sit on their
stepping stones in a row to the left and 64 red frogs sit on their stepping
stones in a row to the right with one stepping stone/Lillie between them.
This means that there is no necessary need to find to use more than one Lillie
because the ultimate formula should answer the original question. I came up
with this strategy because I felt that I would be able to demonstrate a good
sense of communication and organization, which could help me with the
original question consisting of 72 Green Frogs and 64 red frogs. I also decided
to find out the formula for each table because that would be necessary in order
to help find out the answer to the formula for the original question. First of All,
I started by making the First Category, which was Equal Number of Red and
Green Frogs on Each Side (Table Provided Below). Secondly, I decided create
Categories named under Different Number of Red Frogs and Different Number
of Green Frogs, I decided to keep one type of frog on a constant number and
the other one different. For Example, The Tables (Provide Below Categorized
under Different Number of Green Frogs have constant number of Red Frogs
range from 1 to 5 (for the five tables In the Category) and a different number
of Green Frogs ranging from 1 to 21 (for each Table). Once I got the Formulae I
was able to use the formulae to help develop an ultimate formula.

February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

Look below at the table for Assistance on How My tables were structured and
how it looks like:

Equal numbers of frogs

February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

The Diagram Above demonstrates the minimum number of moves for any
number of frogs on each side ranging from 1 to 20. I found that for the table
above it was quite complicated to find formula because Each Time the
Minimum number of Moves changed by a different odd number. The Sequence
of M showed a change each time by a different odd number starting with, 5 and
each time adding by the previous odd number by two, meaning the next odd
number would be 7. As know I knew it is impossible to use the difference
between M to help find the formula, I decided to find the formula by finding
the factors of M. To help me do this I made a table to keep my data collection
organized in a neat fashion.

February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

After Collecting the Factors I found a pattern between the Number of Frogs on
Each Side and the factors of M. I also observed and found that the last factors
of M are increasing by one each time. For Example, from one frog to two frogs
on each side you can see a change in the factors of M. The Factors of M for one
frog on each side change from 1 x 3 to 2 x 4 demonstrating a clear addition of
one to the first and second number of the last factor. This can make us predict
that the next factors after 5 x 7 will be 6 x 8, due to adding one to each side. I
also found that first number of the last factor (Highlighted Blue) are always
counting numbers and are the same numbers provide in the section named,
Number of Frogs on Each Side. This shows that the Formula involves with n
as, n represents the number of frogs on each side and the blue highlighted part
show the same results. Comparing the Orange Highlight part (The Last number
of the Last factors) the difference between the orange highlighted part and n is
two, which makes the n+2 because that equal the orange number. As now we
have two parts of the formula we can see that formula is n(n+2) because in
between the two number of each factor there is a multiplication sign, which
means that we are needed to multiply the two numbers. Though, we have got
the formula we can still simplify it and make the formula n2+ 2n. The Formula
that I have found is a Non Linear Formula.
Now that I know the Formula for Equal Number of Frogs on Each Side, Ill make
a prediction to test my formula and to check if the formula works. I think it
would it would be good to try three different number to Predict and Check for.
I will try predicting and checking 6, 8 and 50.
6 Frogs on Each Side
Prediction Using the Formula n2+ 2n:
6*6+2*6= 36+12= 48
Check:

February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

8 Frogs on Each Side:


Prediction Using the Formula n2+ 2n:
8*8+2*8= 64+16= 80
Check:

50 Frogs on Each Side


Prediction Using the Formula n2+ 2n:
50*50+2*50= 2500 + 100= 2600
Check:
As the game doesnt allow more than 6 frogs per side I wasnt able to find the
actual number of moves for 50 frogs per side. Instead I decided to use my work
to prove the formula and suggest that the formula always works.
To help prove that the formulas always works I have tried to make predictions
(by using my formula) so, I can check with the game If I have met the minimum
number of moves required for the equal number of frogs on each side.

February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

Below I made a few Predictions for Equal Number of Frogs on Each Side:

Check:
6 Frogs on Each Side

7 frogs on Each Side:

8 Frogs on Each Side:

February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

9 Frogs on Each Side:

This show that it works with any number meaning that it will also work with
numbers such as 50 or above.

Different numbers of frogs

February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

The Diagrams Above demonstrates the minimum number of moves for different
number of frogs. The Diagram above demonstrates a change in the number of
red frogs shown as counting numbers and the numbers of green frogs are
staying the same. Though, after each table it is showed that the numbers of
green frogs are changing to different constant, which is 1+, the previous
constant. This can make me predict that the next constant for Table Seven
would be 6 because it is 1+ the previous number, 5. I found that it was very
easy to find out the formula for each table above but, when it came to finding
the main formula, I was clueless. As I was confused I decided to organize my
finding into two different tables and add the individual formula for each at the
end of each. I did this because I felt that maybe this could help me understand
clearly and explain it well during the investigation.

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February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

Full Table: Minimum


Number of Moves and
Formula for Green and Red
Frogs

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February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

After Collecting all the numbers and linear formulae, I inserted them into the
table, which made it look really neat and well organized. I started by getting
the individual linear formulas by the finding the difference of the number in
the rows or columns. For Example, If you look at the First Row in the table
above, it shows that each number is being added by 2 to produce the next
number in the sequence. This makes the Formulae 2g but, 2g doesnt equal to 3
so, this means that we are needed to add the formula by 1. This would make
the final formula 2g+2, but that isnt the main formula. I found the Main
Formulas by look at the co-efficient of each red and saw that r+ 1 always
equals g making the final formula start with (r+1)g. Though formulae was still
incomplete because missing as the red integer above on the section name
Formulae of Green Frogs was missing. As that is number is the same numbers
as r I added r to the formulae making the final formulae, (r+1)g+r. Though, this
is also the same as the Formulae for Red frogs but, in the Red Frogs Formulae
the variable g is used instead of making the formulae in terms of g, (g+1)r+g.

Prediction:
2 Green frogs and 4 Red Frogs:
First Formulae ((r+1)g+r):

(4+1)2+4
=(5)2+4
=10+14
= 14
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February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

Second Formulae ((g+1)r+g):


(2+1)4+2
=(3)4 +2
=12+2
=14

Solve the original problem using your pattern


During the Process of Finding the Information I have found two formulas, which
could help with solving the original problem. I found out that after trying them
the both of the formulas In Terms of G, M= (r+1)g +r and In terms of R,
M= (g+1)r+g.
Below Ill solve the original question using the two different formulas:
Formula In Terms of G (M= (r+1)g +r):
M= (72+1)64 + 72
M=(73)64 +72
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February 3, 2014

Maneesh (Mannav) Tekwani

Year 9B

M=4672+72
M= 4744
Formula In Terms of R (M= (g+1)r+g):
M= (64+1)72 + 64
M=(65)72 +64
M=4680+64
M= 4744

Attempt to write a single algebraic rule that works for all situations.
After Playing around with the Frog Investigation I found two formulas
that help find out Minimum and In Terms of G, M= (r+1)g +r and In
terms of R, M= (g+1)r+g. I feel that the sentence above always works
because I have tried it several times and the result I found always
worked.

Conclusion
In Conclusion, The Frogs investigation is a game that involves with getting two
colours of frogs (green and red) to their opposite sides with the minimum
number of moves by using the lilies. By playing the game several times I found
a pattern between the results and found that there is are a few possible
rules/formulas for this investigation. The two possible formulas that I found
were In terms of g and r. I found that in terms of g, the formula is showed to be
(r+1)g +r and in terms of r is, (g+1)r +g. With these two formulas I tried to find
out the find out the Minimum number of Moves for the original question which
was, 72 green frogs sit on their stepping stones in a row to the left and 64
red frogs sit on their stepping stones in a row to the right with one stepping
stone/Lille between them. How many moves will it take for the green and red
frogs to change sides if they follow the rules laid out below? I tried the
formula and I found that for 72 green frogs and 64 red frogs the formula
present M as 4744.

Bibliography
"The Frog Puzzle - Interactive Mathematical Game - Investigation." The Frog Puzzle Interactive Mathematical Game - Investigation. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Feb. 2014.
"Frogs Investagation." www. Nrich.maths.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Feb. 2014

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