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Andrew Remillard Curriculum Project Phase 1 UNIT: Intro to theatre.

This unit will be for high school students, mainly freshman. They will meet two times per week, for 1 hour and 20 minutes, for 5 weeks. EQs What are the benefits of having a working knowledge of all of the major aspects of theatre? What does it mean to have theatre etiquette? What are the main avenues available for someone looking to have a career in theatre? Curriculum Project Phase 2 Rationale: It is important to me to teach students about the different paths available to them in their future, and to give them the skills and knowledge to execute these different jobs at a very high level. Learning about these options in high school is vital as students will be able to make informed decisions when applying to colleges or professional jobs. Being taught that theatre is fun is great and true, but I also want students to know that they need to work hard and efficiently if they want to have a career in theater. Along with the benefits post graduation, while in school the students will learn how to most effectively and safely communicate with their peers. This will happen through many opportunities to comment and share on their peers work using the vernacular being taught to them throughout the unit. As well as having opportunities to perform the duties of every role in theatre for student projects and main stage productions. Students will know that There is an etiquette that goes along with working in theatre, no matter what road of theatre a student chooses. Students will know the main general skills necessary to have good theatre etiquette for whatever path they choose (actor, director, stage management, theatre technician). Respecting one another, whether doing technical theatre or being an actor, is the standard universal expectation. Students will be able to Share critical feedback about their peers work using a universal vernacular accepted in the theatre world. Accept critical feedback from their peers, and use it to improve their craft. Demonstrate the ability to recognize and use basic tools used everyday in technical theatre.

Demonstrate the ability to be organized. Demonstrate the ability to show up each day with a positive attitude. Curriculum Project Phase 3 Scope and Sequence Class 1- Acting Hook: Popular music playing as they walk in, letting people know they need to leave their baggage at the door. For the next 15-20 minutes. I would play Dont Wake the Dragon to start things off. Get people on their feet, using their bodies, and learning names. Then, Bomb and Shield, a relatively low risk warm up, yet still physically engaging and energizing. I would follow this up with a brief comment on what worked that made these games exciting and those types of risks are what actors need to take. Body: For this first lesson on Acting, I would talk about the way a typical production runs from the viewpoint of an actor. I would have a typical timeline of events, from audition, rehearsal, tech week, the run, strike. This lesson would include a lecture, and some techniques, on: professionalism, being early, leaving baggage at the door, auditioning and the knowledge that once you commit to a show, you need to stay committed to your ensemble. Closure:10 minutes. Circle up, have each class member say one thing they learned about acting/being an actor. Homework(if applicable):10 minutes class time. Assign scene partners. Send them home with a packet of scenes to review, they should have an idea of what they want to do and will have a few minutes to decide with their partners next class.(These scenes will be short, 1 page scenes that will be worked on next class, also there will only be 3 or 4 options.) Class 2- Acting Hook: Guided meditation, focus on breathing from the core and releasing tension. Body: We will have the partners decide on their scenes, then take some time to read their scenes multiple times and start to create their given circumstances. I will have a handout explaining given circumstances and asking for certain information to be decided upon. I will then lecture on the process of reading your play, determining your GCs and then getting up on your feet to try it out. We will follow this lecture with a tableau exercise, focused around creating relationships informed by the words friendship and love. We will comment on these tableaus objectively and subjectively. This is intended to inform the students of how the choices they make physically, truly impact how the audience interprets what is happening on stage. Closure: Brief lecture on the actors body and how to respect your tool and your craft, now that we have gotten them on their feet and starting to use and develop that tool. Homework(if applicable): Meet with scene partner over the weekend for at least an hour to rehearse scene and get off book.

Class 3- Acting Hook: 15 minutes. Circle up and play yes, speaking yes, then just nodding, then with music, moving to the beats. Body: 25 minutes to work on their short scenes, 20 minutes to share scenes with each other. Practicing being a good audience and what it means to give good critical feedback in a respectful manner. Closure: 20 minutes. Story circle, telling a story with a beginning, middle and end Homework (if applicable): No homework. Class 4- Stage Management Hook: Columbian Hypnosis Body: Lecture on my experience as a professional stage manager, explain major responsibilities of the job, highlighting necessary skills, (not forgetting a sense of humor and strong inter-personal skills). Go more into how to take blocking notation, give out short scripts set up to take blocking notes and have them fill in short hand blocking notes from written out sentences of blocking. Have them get in groups and compare to see what they liked about what other students had done. Closure: 5-10 minutes. Get in small groups and talk about what they think they might like about stage managing and what they think they wouldnt and why. Also, talk about the connections between Columbian Hypnosis and Stage Management. Homework (if applicable): No homework. Class 5- Stage Management Hook: Shake hands, make eye contact, maintain these two things, share something fun that happened over the weekend. Body: We will look at all of the organizational paperwork that goes with being a stage manager and/or assistant stage manager. From props lists, to contact lists, run lists, pre-set lists, sign in sheets etc. Closure: Play improv games for last 10-15 minutes, theyre theatre kids dealing with paper work all class, plus this will help reinforce saying yes and being a team player. Homework (if applicable): Study notes and handouts from todays class and the previous class as there will be a test on stage management next class. Class 6- Stage Management Hook: 20 minutes. Ask two of the pairs of students to perform their scenes from earlier on in the unit. The rest of the class will watch the scene and do their best at taking blocking notes for the scene. Well see each scene twice, and see if there are any improvements in blocking notation watching for the second time. Body: 20-30 minutes. Have classical music playing while administering test on the paperwork and job requirements of being a stage manager or assistant stage manager. Closure:10 mins Pass out and go over a single page recap of highlights of being a professional stage manager, focusing on professionalism and responsibilities as something on paper to look back at in the future.

Homework (if applicable):Last 10-15 minutes. Assign and pass out a play to read for next class. Explain we will be looking at the play from a Directors point of view. Class 7-Directing Hook:10 minutes. Mill and Seethe, move through the space with different prompts aimed at getting in touch with larger, abstract ideas and themes. Body: Students will work in groups discussing the play and working on filling out a provided worksheet aimed at attaining said theme and given circumstances of the play. Students will also have to answer questions about character relations to each of the other characters in the play. Keeping the class in groups, one representative from the group will share what they came up with for each question. We will then move into talking about positions of power on the stage, and how certain positioning of actors on the stage will automatically send messages to the audience about what is going on in the world of the play. Worksheet(s) provided. I will use volunteers from the class to model the different looks on stage so we can see first hand where the power is and which actor has the power. Closure: We will sit in a circle and go around giving everyone the opportunity to say one word about the work they saw going on today. Homework (if applicable): Write a one page essay about which characters play this is and why. Class 8- Directing Hook: Story circle, this story circle would be aimed at telling a story that overcomes a problem. Body: I will split the class into two groups, one abstract art, one word play. One paper full of words that describe the themes, tones and plot lines of the play. One paper full of abstract art to describe the themes, tones and plot lines of the play. We will see what is similar and what is different about each page, talk about what we can learn from doing this exercise. Then lecture on incorporating themes, images, brainstorming and big ideas, into the small details of the play. Closure: 10 minutes of discussing what we learned about directing. Homework (if applicable): Pass out packet of pictures of tools most commonly used in technical theatre, along with a sheet on safety protocol in the shop. Class 9- Theatre Technician Hook: I will have a table or two covered with all of the most common tools used in technical theatre, with a number next to each tool. I will have music playing. As students walk in I will tell them they are not to talk and they need to walk around the tables and write the name of each tool corresponding to the number next to the tool. Body: After about 10-15 minutes of identifying tools, I will have them get into small groups and share with each other to see how complete they can make their list. Well then together go over the sheet from start to finish to make sure that everyone has all of the correct names corresponding with the correct tools. Well then talk about making all set pieces safe for actors, showing pieces in different stages, some

actor ready and others not. I would then ask them which tool they would use to make the pieces actor safe. (I will have different safety issues, i.e. edges that need sanding, a flat with a screw poking out etc.) Closure: I will give a brief demonstration of how to properly use power tools. (Table saw, radial arm saw, circular saw, band saw, drill press.) Homework (if applicable): Send students home with packets labeling all of the different parts of a theater space, they will need to study this as we will be having a quiz the next class. Class 10- Theatre Technician Hook: Once all are gathered, I will say I want you to go to the place in the theater that I am name, or if its not a place you can get to, point to what Im talking about. Body: Well then talk about how knowing the spaces in the theater is very useful in being able to communicate clearly. We will also talk about common warnings that are given when working on stage, as well as all safety measures that are taken working in theatre. Safety is always first, proper protocol when climbing scaffolding, going up to the grid, loading weight and so on will be explained. When going into technical theatre, technicians and designers and stage managers often have to talk with directors and actors and producers and sharing a vernacular will help the communication between the two groups. Closure: Watch a time lapse video of a concert going in and out of Fenway Park. After the 3 minute video, ask what people noticed and talk about why it relates to theatre technicians. Homework (if applicable): End of unit, no homework. Curriculum Project Phase 4 Three full lesson plans in Understanding by Design format. Lesson 1- Acting (Class 2) Standards for theater strand 1: Acting. Students will develop acting skills to portray characters who interact in improvised and scripted scenes. 1.17 Demonstrate an increased ability to work effectively alone and collaboratively with a partner or in an ensemble. EQ: How do you know what the given circumstances are in a play? How do you interpret different prompts into a tableau? How do you use your body to help tell the story on stage? K: Students will know that the given circumstances are found in the script. the given circumstances inform the actor about the character, and are intended to be used to create a more truthful character. a tableau is a frozen image. the specificity of their physicality is important in telling a story on stage.

Students will be able to: Identify the given circumstances in a play. Interpret the given circumstances in a way that shapes their character on stage. Create tableaus around word prompts. Use their physicality to help tell the story. Stage 2 Students will complete given circumstances worksheet, which we can then correct. Students will attempt to let the prompts love and friendship inform how they create tableaus. I will inquire with each group about the relationship dynamics in the tableau. I will be able to comment on each tableau and point out physicality that is working or not, and say why or why not. Stage 3 Hook: Guided meditation, focus on breathing from the core and releasing tension. Body: We will have the partners decide on their scenes, then take some time to read their scenes multiple times and start to create their given circumstances. I will have a handout explaining given circumstances and asking for certain information to be decided upon (filling in the missing pieces to complete the story). I will then lecture on the process of reading your play, determining your GCs and then getting up on your feet to try it out. We will follow this lecture with a tableau exercise, focused around creating relationships informed by the words friendship and love. We will comment on these tableaus objectively and subjectively. This is intended to inform the students of how the choices they make physically, truly impact how the audience interprets what is happening on stage. Closure: Brief lecture on the actors body and how to respect your tool and your craft, now that we have gotten them on their feet and starting to use and develop that tool. Homework(if applicable): Meet with scene partner over the weekend for at least an hour to rehearse scene and get off book.

Lesson 2- Directing (Class 7) Stage 1 Standard 3: Directing. Students will rehearse and stage dramatic works. 3.1 In creating and rehearsing informal classroom dramatizations, experiment with and make decisions about the visual configuration of the acting space (e.g., actors exits, entrances, placement of set pieces, and the location of the audience)

How do you mill and seethe in a way that is safe and productive? How do you use the given circumstances to determine the relationships between characters? How do you use what we know about power positions on the stage to help tell your story? Students will know that milling and seething is a time for them to focus, and to shed any baggage they may be carrying with them from the day. given circumstances lead us to the truths behind each character, and these truths determine the relationships between each character. there are physical locations on the stage that have more and less power, and how we choose to utilize these locations will affect how the story is told. Students will be able to mill and seethe effectively. identify given circumstances, and then use them to understand character. dynamics, helping them determine how to create powerful stage pictures. recognize power positions on the stage. Stage 2 I will be able to assess their level of focus and seriousness during milling and seething. When the groups respond aloud, I will be able to assess their understanding based on their answers. I will know who is on the right track and who may have wandered off. Also, this will show artistic differences and highlight that though the given circumstances may lead us one way, not everyone will interpret them exactly the same way. I will ask for volunteers to take the positions on the stage that we have discussed and modeled to see if they can re-create them accurately while demonstrating knowledge of why these positions create different dynamics. Stage 3 Hook:10 minutes. Mill and Seethe, move through the space with different prompts aimed at getting in touch with larger, abstract ideas and themes. Body: Students will work in groups discussing the play and working on filling out a provided worksheet aimed at attaining said theme and given circumstances of the play. Students will also have to answer questions about character relations to each of the other characters in the play. Keeping the class in groups, one representative from the group will share what they came up with for each question. We will then move into talking about positions of power on the stage, and how certain positioning of actors on the stage will automatically send messages to the audience about what is going on in the world of the play. Worksheet(s) provided. I will use

volunteers from the class to model the different looks on stage so we can see first hand where the power is and which actor has the power. Closure: We will sit in a circle and go around giving everyone the opportunity to say one word about the work they saw going on today. Homework (if applicable): Write a one page essay about which characters play this is and why. Lesson 3- Theatre Technician (Class 10) Stage 1 Standard 4: Technical Theatre Students will demonstrate skills in using the basic tools, media, and techniques involved in theatrical production. 4.9 Describe characteristics of theatre technology and equipment based on a tour of a high school or professional theatre 4.10 Show appropriate respect for the safety and maintenance of the work space, tools, and equipment How do you communicate clearly with other members of the technical production team? How do you take the proper safety methods when working on the stage? Students will know that there is a proper term for each part of the theater building that is nationally recognized. safety is always first in theatre. communicating clearly with other production members is an extremely important skill to have. Students will be able to identify the different parts of the theater building. take the proper steps in using safe practices when working in theatre. use a vernacular that is recognized nationally in the theatre world. Stage 2 I will assess using a quiz at the top of class on identifying theater locations. Asking the group to identify the steps that must be taken to ensure a safe working environment. I will give each student a piece of paper with a place in the theater on it and they will need to go to that place, there shouldnt be more than one person in each place. Stage 3

Class 10- Theatre Technician Hook: Once all are gathered, I will say I want you to go to the place in the theater that I am naming, or if its not a place you can get to, point to what Im talking about. Body: Well then talk about how knowing the spaces in the theater is very useful in being able to communicate clearly. We will also talk about common warnings that are given when working on stage, as well as all safety measures that are taken working in theatre. Safety is always first, proper protocol when climbing scaffolding, going up to the grid, loading weight and so on will be explained. When going into technical theatre, technicians and designers and stage managers often have to talk with directors and actors and producers and sharing a vernacular will help the communication between the two groups. Closure: Watch a time lapse video of a concert going in and out of Fenway Park. After the 3 minute video, ask what people noticed and talk about why it relates to theatre technicians. Homework (if applicable): End of unit, no homework.