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American Government Thematic Unit

JT Tremaine

Table of Contents Pg 2: Bulletin Board (Shows on ActiveBoard)

Pg 3-6: Lesson 1 Public Service Pg 7-9: Lesson 2 Voting Pg 10-12: Lesson 3 Local and State Government Pg 13-15: Lesson 4 Political News and Issues Pg 16-22: Lesson 5 Branches of Government Pg 23: Book List Pg 24: Additional Resources

Constitution
Day 1: Public Service Day 2: Voting Day 3: Local and State Government Day 4: Political Issues Day 5: Branches of Government

Voting Public Service

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT
We the People Bill of Rights

President
Elections

Subject

Social Studies/Language Arts

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Grade Duration of lesson Materials 4 One Class Lesson Period 45 minutes Lesson and Activity teaches students the importance of the voting process, how candidates campaign for office, and how to make a persuasive statement. ActiveBoard Pencil Paper Markers Crayons Colored Pencils Images of public servants Kennedy Speech http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLdA1ikkoEc

Sunshine State Standard(s)

(SS.4.C.2.3) Explain the importance of volunteerism.

(LACC.4.SL.1.1.b,c,d) I can ask and respond to different questions and contribute to the discussion. Lesson/Instructional Objective(s) After viewing the portion of John F. Kennedys inaugural speech that includes Ask not what your country can do for you and receiving explicit instruction about what volunteerism is, how different people volunteer for public service (police, firefighters, soldiers, public officials, politicians, teachers, charity workers, etc. and especially, Presidents of the United States, and completing the what can I do for my country project, students will be able to understand the importance of volunteerism and public service and create a drawing of themself in a public service role which includes a sentence about the public service theyve chosen and an illustration with 100% accuracy.

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Hook/Anticipatory Set On the active board, after receiving a brief contextual lesson on President Kennedy and the major events going on in the 1960s, students will view the short clip of President Kennedys famous inaugural speech.

Procedures

1. Teacher will ask the class if they know what volunteerism is, and what people who volunteer do. 2. Teacher will engage students in conversation about the importance of volunteerism, what kinds of things people volunteer for, and why those things are important to us. 3. Teacher will queue the short excerpt of JFKs speech for the students to watch. Teacher will ask the students what kind of message they think President Kennedy was trying to convey to the people of America, and the world. 4. Students will be asked to take out a piece of paper and their crayons, colored pencils or markers. 5. Teacher will give students instructions for the activity. Students will write two sentences about one way they can volunteer either now, or when they grow up, that will help people. Student will include at least one sentence stating what they would volunteer for. Poster will include I can volunteer to help by __________________. 6. Students will include an illustration to accompany their sentence showing how they can volunteer and be helpful to their community or country. 7. Teacher will play on the ActiveBoard a slideshow showing many forms of volunteerism to help students with inspiration. 8. When the students have completed their artwork, a few will be shown as examples, and the student will identify their form of volunteerism and read their sentence. 9. Teacher will then close the lesson by once again emphasizing the importance of volunteering, and pointing out examples of public servants who make our lives better in America. Suggested focus vocabulary: Volunteerism, Volunteer, public service, community, charity, first responder

Assessment of Learning

1. Assessment of student learning achieved through creation of volunteerism project. Students will choose a

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Outcomes

method of volunteerism and public service in which to represent the concept. (50%) 2. Student will include at least one sentence that begins with a phrase such as, I can volunteer to help by. (25%) 3. Poster will include an illustration of the form of volunteerism theyve chosen. (25%) Closure (approximately 5 minutes) . 1. A few students will be chosen to show their artwork as example of volunteerism. Student will name their form of volunteerism and read their sentence.. 10. Teacher will review the importance of volunteerism, emphasizing the importance of volunteering, and pointing out examples of public servants who make our lives better in America. *If it appears that remediation is necessary, students may need explicit instruction regarding choice of type of public service they can engage in or writing. If class, overall, has difficulty with the lesson, students may need practice assignments to reinforce the concept.

Closure

Accommodations and Modifications for ELLs Accommodations and Modifications for ESE

Level 2 ELL Students may receive a copy of Kennedys speech translated into their native language. Additional vocabulary words will be added to ELL students vocabulary journal in order to assist in comprehension. ESE Accommodations met based on childs 504 or IEP requirements. Students with fine motor control issues may verbally describe the type of public service they could engage in and may choose to cut pictures out of a magazine to represent their chosen form of public service. Gifted students are encouraged to think more deeply about why volunteerism is important and what the world would be like if no one volunteered for public service. The student may draw an additional picture, if time allows, that shows some of the consequences of a world without volunteerism. Crossover potential for reading newspaper and internet articles about

Extensions for Gifted Students

Possible connections to

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other content areas charity workers and public servants and their works. Crossover with reading lessons about specific public service related stories.

Subject

Social Studies/Language Arts

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Grade Duration of lesson Materials 4 One Class Lesson Period 45 minutes Lesson and Activity teaches students the importance of the voting process, how candidates campaign for office, and how to make a persuasive statement. ActiveBoard Pencil Paper Markers Crayons Colored Pencils Famous campaign posters. Sunshine State Standard(s) (SS.4.C.2.3) Explain the importance of voting.

(LACC.4.SL.1.1.b,c,d) I can ask and respond to different questions and contribute to the discussion. Lesson/Instructional Objective(s) After receiving explicit instruction about what voting is, how voting contributes to the election of public officials, and specifically, Presidents of the United States, and completing the campaign poster project, students will be able to understand the importance of voting and create a campaign poster which shows at least one persuasive statement with 100% accuracy. On the active board, students will see a sample of a Campaign poster for a presidential election.

Hook/Anticipatory Set

Procedures

11. Teacher will ask the class if they know what voting is, and what voting helps us to do. 12. Teacher will engage students in conversation about the importance of voting, what kinds of things that people can vote on, what effect voting has on the lives of the people, and that not everyone in the world has the right to vote.

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13. Teacher will queue samples of Campaign posters, and show examples of how these posters helped inform people, and influence people to vote for a candidate. Teacher will ask the students what kind of message they think that each poster is trying to tell voters. 14. Students will be asked to take out a piece of paper and their crayons, colored pencils or markers. 15. Teacher will give students instructions for the activity. Students will use the campaign posters shown as examples to inspire them to create their own campaign posters. The posters can use anyone as a candidate, Darth Vader, a Power Ranger, The Little Mermaid, Optimus Prime, or the student themself; anyone the student knows, that they think might make a good President. 16. Student will include at least one slogan statement on the poster that shows why they think their chosen candidate will be a good president. Strong leadership! or We will win! are good examples. Poster will include _____ For President somewhere on the poster. 17. When the students have completed their posters, a few will be shown as examples, and the student will identify their candidate and read their slogan. 18. Teacher will then close the lesson by once again emphasizing the importance of voting. Suggested focus vocabulary: Presidential, Candidate, Election, Voting, Slogan, Campaign
Assessment of Learning Outcomes

4. Assessment of student learning achieved through creation of candidate posters. Students will choose a candidate of their choice (fictional or non-fictional that they think might make a good President as the focus of their project and create a candidacy poster for them. (50%) 5. Student will include at least one slogan statement on the poster that shows why they think their chosen candidate will be a good president. Strong leadership! or We will win! are good examples. (25%) 6. Poster will include ___________ for President somewhere on the poster. (25%)

Closure

Closure (approximately 5 minutes) . 2. A few students will be chosen to show their posters as examples. Student will name their candidate and their slogan. 3. Teacher will review the importance of voting, focusing specifically on how voting helps to bring about changes in our society. *If it appears that remediation is necessary, students may need explicit instruction regarding the creation of a slogan or writing. If class, overall, has difficulty with the lesson, students may need practice assignments to reinforce the concept.

Accommodations and Modifications for ELLs Accommodations and Modifications for ESE Extensions for Gifted Students

Level 1 ELL Students will benefit from examples of campaign poster examples and explanation of key vocabulary such as Vote, and Election. Additional vocabulary words will be added to ELL students vocabulary journal in order to assist in comprehension. ESE Accommodations met based on childs 504 or IEP requirements. Students with visual difficulties or blindness may choose to compose a brief persuasive statement to go along with their slogan and present to the class in lieu of creation of poster. Gifted students are encouraged to think more deeply about why voting is important, and how not voting could impact the political process. If student completes poster early, they may design and create a campaign pin with their slogan and candidate name to go along with their poster. Crossover potential for reading newspaper and internet articles about past and current campaigns. Crossover with possible mathematics lessons based on counting of votes, demographics, charting, etc.)

Possible connections to other content areas

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Subject Grade Duration of lesson Materials Social Studies/Language Arts 4 One Class Lesson Period 45 minutes Lesson and Activity teach students the scope and function of their local government as well as how to involve themselves in their communities via writing letters to local and state executive officers. Activeboard Letter to the Mayor worksheet Pencil Government Websites:

Governor Rick Scott: http://www.flgov.com/meet-governor-scott

Sarasota Mayor Shannon Snyder: http://sarasotagovcom.gowest1.gowesthosting.com/Commissioners/Index.cfm

City of Venice Mayor John Holic: http://www.venicegov.com/Boards_Links/city_council.asp Sunshine State Standard(s) (SS.4.C.3.2) Distinguish between state (governor, state representative, or senator) and local government (mayor, commissioner).

(LACC.4.SL.1.1.b,c,d) I can ask and respond to different questions and contribute to the discussion. Lesson/Instructional Objective(s) After receiving explicit instruction on local and state executive officers, students will be able to distinguish the difference between city and state government (Mayor and Governor) by completing the provided worksheet with at least 80% accuracy. On the active board, students will see the pictures of the mayors of Venice and Sarasota, as well as the Governor of Florida. Teacher will

Hook/Anticipatory Set

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introduce these three people and give a brief background on them. Procedures

19. Teacher will ask students what they know about Mayors and Governors. What is a Mayor? What is a Governor? What do they do? What areas do they oversee? 20. Teacher will give explicit instruction to students explaining the offices of Mayor and Governor, as well as how city government differs from State Government with a minor introduction into, and comparison with, Federal Government. 21. Teacher will ask the class Who is from the city of Venice? Who is from the City of Sarasota? 22. Teacher will write City, County, State, Nation, Continent, and Planet on the board, out of order. Students will be called on, one by one to place the areas in order from largest to smallest. Teacher will then place Be sure to make comparisons to the local school as reference in order to use student background knowledge to provide reference students can relate to. (Principal, Teacher) 23. Teacher will explain what a Governor and a Mayor have the power to do within their jurisdiction. (Mayor: repair and build roads, repair and build government buildings, approve city statutes, set aside land for city use within the city (preserves, parks, etc) //::// Governor: approve state laws, set aside land for state use (State Parks, State Preserves, etc), build state buildings for government use, approve state-wide construction projects (highways, railways, etc.) Be sure to ask students for examples of these in order to ensure comprehension. 24. After instruction on levels of government is concluded, teacher will hand out the Letter to the Mayor writing prompt which includes the header for a formal letter to their local City Mayor.
Students will complete the Letter to the Mayor worksheet. The worksheet consists of a letter addressed to their city Mayor which includes multiple choice options of items. Each option contains one choice of a local level and scope item, and three non-local options. Each multiple choice question is worth 20pts. Correct identification of city name is worth 20pts for a total of a possible 100pts.

Assessment of Learning Outcomes

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Closure

Closure (approximately 5 minutes) 4. A few students will be called on to provide examples of things theyd asked for of their local Mayor. At this point reinforcement of which would be more appropriate (local or state) can be imparted based on student responses. 5. Students will hand in their letters to be graded. *If it appears that remediation is necessary, students may need explicit instruction regarding the scope of local and state government. If class, overall, has difficulty with the lesson, students may need practice assignments to reinforce the concept.

Accommodations and Modifications for ELLs Accommodations and Modifications for ESE Extensions for Gifted Students

Level 2 ELL Students will benefit from visual models and charts representing the offices of Governor and Mayor as well as other levels of government. Ell students may receive the letter translated into their native language. ESE Accommodations met based on childs 504 or IEP requirements. Students with LDs or ADHD may receive a flow chart handout with local and state government scope outlined. Gifted students are encouraged to think more deeply about how writing letters to city officials can effect change in a community. These students are encouraged to think of more than one thing in their community that they would like to change or other ways they could effect change within their communities. Crossover potential for reading stories and biographies about local city mayors and state governors in history. Additional connections possible with math in understanding civics. Connections with Geography in understanding districts and city, county and state borders.

Possible connections to other content areas

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Month Day, 2013 The Honorable John Holic Mayor of Venice Office of Mayor John Holic 401 West Venice Avenue, Venice, FL 34285 Dear Mayor Holic: My name is ______________. I live in the city of ______________ in the State of Florida. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Thank you very much for your time. Sincerely yours, ________________________________________________

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Subject Grade Duration of lesson Materials Social Studies/Language Arts 4 One Class Lesson Period 45 minutes Lesson and Activity gets students thinking about Florida political issues as well as helps students understand places to find current events information. Additionally, students will utilize note taking and brainstorming exercises during group work. ActiveBoard Pencil Paper Florida Issues News Website

Florida News Report:

http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/07/17/3504323/heavy-rainsflood-south-florida.html Sunshine State Standard(s) (SS.4.C.2.1) Locate issues that impact Floridians

(SS.4.C.2.1) Discuss the issues that impact the lives of Floridians.

(LACC.4.SL.1.1.b,c,d) I can ask and respond to different questions and contribute to the discussion. Lesson/Instructional Objective(s) After receiving explicit instruction about different ways people can find out about issues happening in Florida (Newspapers, Internet, TV News, etc.) and viewing a news report on a local Florida issue, students will be able to complete a T-Chart listing at least 4 problems that the selected Florida issue might pose for people and the environment, as well as 4 possible solutions to these problems with 100% accuracy.

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Hook/Anticipatory Set On the active board, students will see a local news report found on the internet. Teacher will begin discussion asking students different ways they can find out about whats going on in Florida. (Looking for: TV News, Newspapers, Word of Mouth, Internet, etc.)

Procedures

25. Teacher will ask students if they know about any Florida issues. Teacher guides the discussion on to asking students how they heard about these issues. 26. Teacher will ask students about the different ways that they know of to keep track of what is going on in Florida. (Newspapers, TV News, etc.) 27. Teacher will queue up the news report on the ActiveBoard. 28. Students will be asked to take out a paper and pencil. 29. Teacher will give students instructions for the activity. Students are to listen to the news report and write down as many potential problems that they hear about, or think of while listening to the report. 30. When the report is over, group captains are instructed to take out a piece of paper. On the whiteboard, teacher will draw an example of a T-Chart. Group captain is to draw a T-Chart on their groups paper. 31. When this is completed, groups will compare what theyve written on their papers while viewing the video. Students will write down at least 4 potential problems that could occur based on the news report in the left-hand column of the T-Chart. Students will then be instructed to put themselves in the place of the City Council. On the right-hand column of the T-Chart, the group should discuss and come up with at least one solution to each of the problems that they wrote in the left-hand column that they believe they as the city council should address. 32. When T-Charts are complete, another student from the group will then share their T-Charts with the class and discuss the problems and solutions theyve come up with.
Informal assessment of student learning achieved through discussion with class after creation of T-Charts. Students will present the problems they observed and the possible solutions theyd come up with. Additional assessment possible through completion of the group T-Chart and handing in of student lists of issues (notes taken

Assessment of Learning Outcomes

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while viewing News Report). Students will complete note taking and brainstorming as well as complete group T-Chart assignment creating a minimum of 4 problems/solutions as a group. Closure

Closure (approximately 5 minutes) . 6. Students will hand in their group T-Charts and individual notes. 7. Teacher will explain to students how they just worked like a city council in their ability to see problems and work together to come up with possible solutions. *If it appears that remediation is necessary, students may need explicit instruction regarding the note taking process and/or additional group work assignments. If class, overall, has difficulty with the lesson, students may need practice assignments to reinforce the concept.

Accommodations and Modifications for ELLs Accommodations and Modifications for ESE Extensions for Gifted Students

Level 3 ELL Students will benefit from use of T-Chart and graphic organizers. Additional vocabulary words will be added to ELL students vocabulary journal in order to assist in comprehension. ESE Accommodations met based on childs 504 or IEP requirements. Students with hearing difficulties or deafness may receive headphones or closed caption accommodations. Gifted students are encouraged to think more deeply about not only issues impacting Florida, but issues that might be affecting the entire country or the whole world. These students are encouraged to list these items at the bottom of their T-Charts and come up with solutions to them as well. Crossover potential for reading newspaper and internet articles about Florida issues. Science connections can be made to ecological and environmental impact of issues on Floridas ecosystems. Crossover with possible mathematics lessons depending on the individual issues found (demographics, populations, number of people impacted, etc.)

Possible connections to other content areas

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Subject Grade Duration of lesson Materials Social Studies/Language Arts 4 One Class Lesson Period 45 minutes Lesson and Activity teaches students branches of government along with their powers and duties. ActiveBoard Sticky Tack Branches of Government Cards (to place on the board) Large Poster board or Tri-Folding Display board

http://education-portal.com/academy/lesson/the-us-constitutionpreamble-articles-and-amendments.html#lesson

(Only the first part on the first three Amendments of the Bill of Rights) Sunshine State Standard(s) (SS.4.C.3.1) Describe the organizational structure (legislative, executive, judicial branches) and powers of the federal government as defined in Articles I, II, and III of the U.S. Constitution.

(LACC.4.SL.1.1.b,c,d) I can ask and respond to different questions and contribute to the discussion. Lesson/Instructional Objective(s) After watching the video on the powers of the branches of government granted to them by the Constitution, and after receiving explicit instruction on the subject from the teacher, students will identify the three branches of government, identify the duties of each branch of government, and demonstrate teamwork skills in order to win the Branches of the Government game.

Hook/Anticipatory Set

On the active board, after receiving a brief contextual lesson on President Kennedy and the major events going on in the 1960s,

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students will view the short clip of President Kennedys famous inaugural speech. Procedures

33. Teacher will play the movie about the Three Branches of Government, and then enter into some back and forth discussion with the students about what they just viewed. Teacher should be sure to ask students questions about what they watched, and check for comprehension before beginning the game. 34. Teacher will divide the class into three teams. 35. Teacher will randomize and then pass out all of the Branches of Government cards (give the easier cards to struggling students or ELLs and the more difficult cards to those students who need a challenge. 36. Teacher will determine the order in which the teams begin the game. 37. The students will take turns going up to the board (one student from each team) and stick their card in the appropriate place (using Sticky Tack). Start with the three branches (Legislative, Executive, Judicial), then under each branch add the cards that tell who comprises that branch. Students are encouraged to work together in their team to come to a group decision on card placement. 38. Finally, have the students add the cards that describe the duties of each branch. 39. Teacher will then review each branch for correct and incorrect placements. Students should, as a class, help to decide if a placement is correct, or incorrect and move the incorrect placements to the right category. 40. The team with the most correct placements when all the cards have been placed is the winner. 41. When the game is over, the students will have a completed flow chart of the Branches of Government, the lead officers, and the duties and powers of each to place on the wall in the classroom as reference.

Suggested focus vocabulary: Constitution, Bill of Rights, Executive, Legislative, Judicial, Branches of Government, Cabinet, Senate, House of Representatives,

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President, Supreme Court, Appoint
Assessment of Learning Outcomes

7. Assessment of student learning achieved through Participation in the game activity. (50%) 8. Each team should have at least 4 correct choices. (25%) 9. Each student should cooperate effectively with their team. (25%) Closure (approximately 5 minutes) . 42. Teacher will review the completed flowchart board with the class, and place it in a place of prominence so that students can reference it. *If it appears that remediation is necessary, students may need explicit instruction regarding the specific duties of each branch of government. If class, overall, has difficulty with the lesson, students may need practice assignments to reinforce the concept.

Closure

Accommodations and Modifications for ELLs Accommodations and Modifications for ESE Extensions for Gifted Students

Level 2 ELL Students may receive a sheet with the words of the game listed in their native language as well as the duties listed in their native language. Additional vocabulary words will be added to ELL students vocabulary journal in order to assist in comprehension. ESE Accommodations met based on childs 504 or IEP requirements. Students with fine motor control issues or who are immobile may have assistance placing the cards on the board. Gifted students are encouraged to think more deeply about why the government is constructed the way it is. These students may research more into other powers and requirements of these branches of government and their officers and place additional information on the class flow chart. Crossover potential for reading stories about how the Constitution was written, and why, math connections based on the needed votes for a 2/3 majority.

Possible connections to other content areas

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Words to be included on Game Cards listed below:
(Printed and cut out or hand written on index cards) EXECUTIVE

PRESIDENT

Appoints Judges

Negotiates Treaties

Elected by the Entire Country

Veto Bills to Deny/Delay Approval of Laws

Commander in Chief of Armed Forces

Sign Bills into Laws

Appoints or Removes Cabinet Members

LEGISLATIVE

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

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SENATE

Elected from Individual States

Approve Judicial Nominations

Write, Debate, and Vote on Laws

Make Laws

Approve Cabinet Members

Can Declare War

JUDICIAL

SUPREME COURT

Rules whether something is Constitutional

Explain Meaning of Constitution and Laws Passed by Congress

Overseesthe Court System of the U.S.

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Serve Life Terms

Decisions Set PrecedentsNew ways of Interpreting the Law

Nominated by the President

23 Book List
How the U.S. Government Works by Sobel, Syl

We the Kids: The Preamble to the Constitution of the United States by David Catrow

The Declaration of Independence (True Books: American History) by Elaine Landau

The New Big Book of U.S. Presidents. by Todd Davis

The Bill of Rights (True Books: American History) by Christine Taylor-Butler

A More Perfect Union: The Story of Our Constitution by Betsy Maestro

We the People: The Story of Our Constitution by Lynne Cheney and Greg Harlin

Presidential Campaign Posters: Two Hundred Years of Election Art

Time For Kids: John F. Kennedy: The Making of a Leader (Time for Kids Biographies) by Editors of TIME For Kids

History for Kids: The Illustrated Life of John F. Kennedy by Charles River Editors

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Additional Resources 1. Bens Guide to U.S. Government for Kids http://bensguide.gpo.gov/3-5/index.html 2. Kids.gov K-5 http://kids.usa.gov/government/index.shtml 3. Congress for Kids http://www.congressforkids.net/ 4. US Government Kids Edition (YouTube) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5EASiHAKpY 5. Schoolhouse Rock Electoral College http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFJ2e82Nvnw 6. Schoolhouse Rock Just a Bill http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TI8xqLl_-w 7. The United States of America For Kids http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJVxNfjwP-U 8. Branches of Government Rap http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mt5K4ZK0ILY 9. First Responders Public Service http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVT-b-odqso 10. Why we need local Government http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TBOGhA9hdI