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Combat Capability for the Future

Crown copyright July 2013


Images Army Picture Desk, Army Headquarters
Designed by Design Studio ADR002930
Foreword 03
The Armoured Cavalry Regiment 04
The Armoured Regiment 06
The Armoured Infantry Battalion 08
The Heavy Protected Mobility Battalion 10
The Air Assault Battalion 12
The Light Cavalry Regiment 14
The Light Protected Mobility Battalion 16
The Light Infantry Battalion 18
3rd (United Kingdom) Division Combat Units 22
16 Air Assault Brigade 22
1st (United Kingdom) Division Combat Units 23
Contents
This set of information notes is designed to explain how life will look and feel
for soldiers in combat units under the Army 2020 design. It is written for soldiers,
addressing those aspects of their professional life that are likely to be of greatest
interest to them: how they will live, how they will train and how they will ght.
There is a wealth of comprehensive literature, explaining the complexities and
nuances of how the Army will transform in the forthcoming decade. This set of
brief notes is not intended to capture all of those complexities and nuances. It is
deliberately designed to distil some of the complexity associated with this ambitious
change programme and offer a straight-forward explanation of the way that we will
operate in the future, from a soldiers perspective. It should be read in that context.
We are in the process of transforming now, and it is inevitable that some of our
plans will have to be adapted as we deliver this programme of radical change.
But I hope this set of notes will sit in squadron and company ofces and provide
a useful reference, illustrating the many opportunities that undoubtedly exist for
all ranks in the combat arms as we re-structure for unpredictable times.
November 2013
Foreword
Brigadier R B Bruce DSO
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The Armoured Cavalry Regiment
Doctrine. Armoured Cavalry regiments will be manned and
equipped to provide the formation level ground manned
reconnaissance capability within the three Reaction Force
brigades, in 3 (UK) Division. They will be equipped with
CVR(T) initially and, from 2020, with SCOUT Specialist
Vehicle (SV). They will be capable of effectively conducting
reconnaissance tasks and a wide range of enabling tasks
in all environments. Armoured Cavalry soldiers will either
form part of an Armoured Cavalry battlegroup or work in
squadrons supporting the Armoured or Armoured Infantry
battlegroups within their Brigade.
Organisation. Each Armoured Cavalry regiment will be
structured around three Sabre squadrons, optimised for
reconnaissance tasks, a Command and Support squadron
and a Headquarters squadron. The Sabre squadrons will
have three Reconnaissance troops, each with four vehicles,
and a Support troop. The Command and Support squadron
will contain three Guided Weapons troops and a Surveillance
troop. The Armoured Cavalry battlegroup headquarters will
retain the capability to plug into the brigade headquarters,
but will also be prepared to command an independent
reconnaissance or all arms battlegroup.
Training. Each regiment will move through a 3 year readiness
cycle. The Training year will include live training, such as
mounted and dismounted ranges in the UK, as well as some
simulated training such as CATT and CAST. It will build
towards a major battlegroup exercise in BATUS which will
include live ring as well as a Tactical Engagement Simulation
battle against an opposing force. For one squadron the main
exercise will be on Salisbury Plain working with the Heavy
Protected Mobility Infantry battlegroup. At the end of this
training, during their Contingency year, the regiments will be
ready to support operations worldwide and squadrons could
deploy as part of the Lead Armoured Task Force. Mission
Specic Training will be conducted prior to deployment.
Finally, during the Other Tasks year, the focus will be on
career courses and individual skills, building the foundation
for further training. It will also include support to the training
of other units.
Equipment. Armoured Cavalry regiments will initially be
equipped with CVR(T) vehicles, but by 2020 they will be
converting to SCOUT SV. At a cost of 5.4 billion it will deliver
a family of vehicles to the Armoured Cavalry regiments.
At its heart, SCOUT SV will provide the most capable
reconnaissance vehicle in the world. With state of the art
thermal and visual sensors and a Wide Area Search and
Detect capability, it will be unmatched in its ability to nd
and track the enemy in all environments. It will also offer
Armoured Cavalry troops potent repower with a 40mm
automatic stabilised cannon, using a cased telescopic round.
Modern armour and intelligent design will give it unparalleled
protection for its weight and size. Other SV variants wil
provide command and control, recovery and repair, protected
mobility reconnaissance support and ambulance capability,
making Armoured Cavalry regiments a very powerful force.
Infrastructure. The Armoured Cavalry regiments will be
based in Windsor (Household Cavalry Regiment) and Catterick
(Royal Dragoon Guards and Royal Lancers). Most dry training
will take place on Salisbury Plain, with live ring taking place
on Castlemartin ranges. The introduction of SCOUT SV will
also see a state-of-the-art training package with individual
and crew training simulators, a number of which will be held
within the regiment. Further simulators will be held in central
locations, probably Catterick and Salisbury Plain. This will
allow crews to hone their skills before deploying with their
vehicles for operations or live training exercises.
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The Armoured Regiment
Doctrine. Armour will continue to provide a crucial combat
capability in the Army 2020 construct. The primary role of the
Armoured regiment will be support to the infantry, closely
followed by its secondary role, the destruction of enemy
armour. Armour and Armoured Infantry will train together
to exploit fully these facets of the capability. A change to a
4-tank troop construct will mean operating in pairs within
the troop, though this change of organisation will not
dramatically alter how the commander will employ Armour.
Organisation. There will be three Regular Type 56
regiments, supported by a single Reserve Armoured
regiment, in the Reaction Force. The regiments will be
organised into three Sabre squadrons of four 4-tank
troops, delivering 18 tanks and an enhanced echelon.
The Command & Reconnaissance squadron will include
Reconnaissance troop, Command troop, the ISTAR troop
and the Training Wing. These elements will be deployed
as battlegroup troops, with the squadron headquarters
reinforcing battlegroup headquarters. Headquarters
squadron will be re-titled Support squadron and will
continue its role of delivering regimental CSS.
Training. The Armoured regiment will move through a
three year readiness cycle. In its Training year the regiment
will conduct troop and squadron training on Salisbury Plain
Training Area (SPTA) and live ring on Castlemartin Ranges.
The Training year will also include simulated training events
in CATT and CAST. This will all culminate in squadron
and battlegroup training in BATUS. In the Contingency
year the regiment will continue to conduct troop and
squadron training whilst being held at readiness to deploy
on operational missions, with a regiment nominated as the
Armoured regiment on the Lead Armoured Task Force. An
Other Tasks year will follow. The priority during this year will
be to support the training of the wider Army. The regiment
will continue to conduct low-level training and also focus on
individuals career courses and driver training.
Equipment. The Armoured regiments will continue to be
equipped with the Challenger 2 (CR2) Main Battle Tank. CR2
will be progressing through a Life Extension Project in 2020,
replacing the thermal imaging system, the re control systems
and gun control equipment. This will extend the platforms out
of service date to 2035. Opportunities will also be taken to
enhance the capability by replacing current information systems
on the CR2, adding cameras for situational awareness and
providing new ammunition types. Training systems will also be
improved to be more realistic. The Close Reconnaissance troop
will be equipped with the new SCOUT SV from 2020, which
will greatly improve the regiments ability to nd the enemy.
Command and control roles currently lled by Panther and
Spartan are likely to be replaced by the Armoured Battleeld
Support Vehicle (an adapted Warrior) in 2019.
Infrastructure. All three Armoured regiments (Kings Royal
Hussars, Queens Royal Hussars and the Royal Tank Regiment)
will be collocated in Tidworth. Accommodation and feeding
for single soldiers will be provided centrally. Ofcer and
Senior NCO accommodation and messing will be provided,
and where there are shared facilities separate regimental
public rooms will exist in order to maintain regimental ethos.
Service Families Accommodation will be allocated centrally,
with the intention that all those at regimental duty will be
accommodated within 10 miles of the barracks. Vehicle
technical facilities will be shared and the vehicle eet will be
allocated centrally and managed locally to meet the needs
of all three regiments. The Precision Gunnery Training
Equipment will be located centrally and be managed at unit
level, ensuring each regiment can maximise the use of the
facilities available.
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The Armoured Infantry Battalion
Doctrine. Armoured Infantry battalions will be the core
of the Reaction Forces combat power in the newly named
Armoured Infantry brigades, nested in 3 (UK) Division.
Battlegroups will be able to operate with an integrated
Reconnaissance squadron, Armoured squadron and a
Heavy Protected Mobility company, in addition to their own
Armoured Infantry and Support companies. They will be
equipped and trained for warghting tasks anywhere in the
world and will be able to be adapted for other tasks.
Organisation. The battalion will continue to operate three
Rie companies, complemented by Support and Headquarter
companies, with the additional capability provided by
an Assault Pioneer platoon. Armoured Infantry section
manpower will be reduced from 10 to 9 soldiers.
Training. Battalions will operate in a 3 year readiness cycle.
The Training year will focus on collective training, culminating
with events such as battlegroup deployments to BATUS. This
will be followed by a Contingency year, where a battalion will
form the Lead Armoured Battlegroup in the Lead Armoured
Task Force, held at readiness and prepared to deploy on any
given operational mission. A year of Other Tasks such as career
courses, driver training and support to other units training
completes the cycle. With the introduction of the Warrior
Capability Sustainment Project (WCSP) in 2018, there will be
changes to how and where individual training is conducted
with more centralisation at Bovington and around Salisbury
Plain Training Area. New and highly realistic Armoured Infantry
training simulators will be introduced and NCOs will receive
formal tactics training at the Land Warfare School, similar to
that received by platoon commanders.
Equipment. WCSP will bring a new 40mm cannon, able to
defeat all known Infantry Fighting Vehicles, on a stabilised
gun and sighting system allowing ring on the move, in
addition to enhanced protection and electronic systems
inside the vehicle, such as situational awareness screens
for dismounts. It will also make a new range of high-tech
simulation training systems available. In addition, CVR(T) will
be replaced by SCOUT SV, a brand new reconnaissance and
Mortar Fire Controller vehicle. Armoured Battleeld Support
Vehicle (ABSV), an adapted Warrior, will provide increased
mobility and protection for CSMs, medics, Mortar and Anti-
tank platoons, as well as Battlegroup Headquarters.
Logistics. Battlegroup CSS will be far more responsive in
2018 with the introduction of the ABSV and the upgrade of
REME repair and recovery vehicles. A1 and A2 echelons will
be wheeled, in the new MAN Support Vehicle.
Infrastructure. All Armoured Infantry units will move to base
locations around Salisbury Plain Training Area. 1 YORKS will
be based in Warminster, 1 PWRR, 5 RIFLES and 1 MERCIAN
will be based in Bulford, with 1 RRF and 1 R WELSH based
in Tidworth.
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The Heavy Protected
Mobility Battalion
Doctrine. Heavy Protected Mobility (PM) battalions will be
nested in the Armoured Infantry brigades as part of the
Reaction Force. They will have numerous roles, whether
providing a Rie coy to an Armoured Infantry or Armoured
(tank) battlegroup or being the lead troops within a
deployment where tracked vehicles may be unsuitable.
Organisation. The battalion will continue to operate three
Rie companies, complemented by Support and Headquarter
companies, and with the additional capability provided by an
Assault Pioneer platoon. Heavy PM infantry platoons will be
formed of 30 soldiers mounted in 4 Mastiffs.
Training. Battalions will operate in a 3 year readiness cycle.
The Training year will see collective training take place on
local training areas and Salisbury Plain Training Area. This will
be followed by a Contingency year, where a battalion will
provide companies to the Lead Armoured Battlegroup in the
Lead Armoured Task Force. A year of Other Tasks follows,
where the focus will be on individual training, career courses
and support to other units training. Individual training
will be delivered in unit lines and on local training areas,
including the qualifying of drivers and commanders. This will
be delivered by in-unit Driving and Maintenance Instructors,
trained at the Armour Centre in Bovington.
Equipment. Heavy PM battalions will be equipped with
a full spectrum of PM vehicles, including Mastiff for Rie
companies, Ridgback ambulances, Husky for CSMs and the
Mortar platoon, Jackal for the Reconnaissance, Anti-Tank and
Machine Gun platoons, Wolfhound for the CQMS and Panther
for battlegroup headquarters. By 2018 many of these vehicles
will be upgraded to be more appropriate for contingency
roles, with improved suspensions, vehicle mounted radios
and increased under-belly protection for Jackal as examples.
Ultimately the Mastiff eet will be replaced by the Utility
Vehicle, with a current predicted in-service date of 2022. Other
equipment that is currently tted to vehicles in Afghanistan will
be available such as the BOOMERANG shot detection system,
Vehicle Mounted ISTAR and mine-rollers for Mastiff and Husky.
Logistics. Battlegroup CSS will become far more responsive
with the introduction of PM vehicles, including Husky
and MAN SV recovery vehicles. Ridgback will provide the
ambulances in company and regimental aid posts and A1 and
A2 echelons will be wheeled, similar to those of Armoured
Infantry battalions, with the new MAN Support Vehicle.
Infrastructure. Heavy PM battalions are planned to have
moved to occupy enduring locations by the end of 2015
(Catterick for 4 SCOTS and Aldershot for 4 RIFLES and 1 SG,
the Foot Guards battalion rotating in role). Each location
will house a Basic Unit Fleet of vehicles which will be
sufcient for company level training.
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The Air Assault Battalion
Doctrine. Air Assault forces will continue to use air
manoeuvre in order to achieve decisive effect within the
land environment. They will be best suited to providing
a point of entry for land operations through Air Assault,
Airborne and Air-Land operations.
Organisation. The two Parachute battalions within
16 Air Assault Brigade will form the core of the Air Manoeuvre
Battlegroup, fully integrated with the Reserve Parachute
battalion, as part of the Air Assault Task Force. Each Regular
battalion will continue to have 3 Rie companies, an ISTAR
company, including the Reconnaissance and Communications
platoons, and a Support company with Mortars, Machine
Gun and Anti-Tank platoons. The brigade will remain a light,
adaptable and potent force, packing a powerful punch
wherever required around the world.
Training. Training for the Air Assault role takes 12 months.
The force is then held at readiness to deploy for a further 12
months. During training, soldiers transition through individual
skills to platoon and company training.
A battlegroup deployment to Kenya follows, which tests the
fundamental skills of all soldiers in a demanding environment.
Training culminates in Exercise JOINT WARRIOR, the largest
exercise of its kind in Europe, during which soldiers practice
Air Assault missions. Due to 16 Air Assault Brigades
contingent role there will also be training with international
partners such as the American 82nd Airborne Division and
the French 11th Parachute Brigade.
Equipment. An Air Assault battalion will be equipped
with the best equipment that the British Army has to offer.
They will be fully capable of operating at night through the
complete spectrum of operations:
Tactical mobility on the battleeld will be achieved
through a combination of foot, quad bike, Jackal or
support helicopters.
Air manoeuvre will be supported by the Royal Air Force
operating the C-130 Hercules, C-17 and in the future the
A-400M Atlas aircraft, as well as support helicopters such
the Puma 2, Chinook and Merlin.
Airborne Soldiers will continue to utilise the Low Level
Parachute for parachute operations.
Infrastructure. Based in Colchester, all soldiers will
continue to have access to an updated Dismounted Close
Combat Trainer, a modern gym, assault course, ranges and a
back door training area on which they can practice low level
skills and drills.
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The Light Cavalry Regiment
Doctrine. Light Cavalry regiments will provide a highly
mobile nd, understand and inuence capability. They will
combine the mounted reconnaissance skills of the Light
Cavalry soldier with capable, battle-proven wheeled vehicles
to provide a force that can operate at reach and across
a wide range of different physical environments. These
characteristics will ensure Light Cavalry regiments can deliver
a wide range of tactical actions, from reconnaissance tasks
such as scouting, screening and patrolling, to offensive
actions such as the attack or raid. Light Cavalrys versatility
will ensure it will be widely employable, including in Major
Combat, Counter Insurgency or Peace Support operations.
Organisation. Regular and Reserve Light Cavalry regiments
will be fully integrated, with each pair in the same Adaptable
Force brigade. Each Regular Light Cavalry regiment will consist
of a Headquarters squadron, three Sabre squadrons, and
a Command and Support squadron. Each Sabre squadron
will have three Find troops of twelve men mounted on four
vehicles. Three Support troops will train together as part of the
Command and Support squadron in barracks. When deployed
they will work with one of the Sabre squadrons to provide
additional specialist capabilities such as Javelin and Snipers.
Yeomanry soldiers will integrate throughout this structure at
crew, troop and squadron level for exercises and deployments.
Training. Each regiment will operate in a three year readiness
cycle. The Training year will include live training, such as
mounted and dismounted ranges in Castlemartin or Otterburn,
as well as simulated training at CATT and CAST. The exercise
programme will build towards a major exercise on Salisbury
Plain which will bring all these skills together. Regular and
Yeomanry soldiers will be working collectively throughout,
delivering a fully integrated capability. At the end of the
Training year regiments will be ready to support operations
worldwide during their Committed year, with Mission Specic
Training readying the regiment for the tasks that lie ahead.
These tasks might include, for example, Op TOSCA or Defence
Engagement tasks across the world. During the Other Tasks
year, the focus will be on career courses and individual skills,
including driver training and support to other units training.

Career Structure. Light Cavalry soldiers will complete their
Phase 2 training in Bovington, where bespoke Light Cavalry
courses will be delivered. These will ensure all soldiers are not
only mounted specialists but also effective when operating
away from their vehicles. For Regular soldiers, this training
will continue through to a Light Cavalry Junior Commanders
Course and, as a Corporal, a bespoke Light Cavalry Crew
Commanders Course. Reserve commanders will receive
bespoke training to an equally high standard, all of which will
remain central to maintaining overall mounted excellence.
Equipment. For the Regular Light Cavalry regiments, the
primary platforms will be Jackal and Coyote, both highly
capable vehicles already proven on operations. Yeomanry
regiments will train on R-WMIK but could convert to Jackal
and Coyote for a deployment depending on the task.
Critically, all these platforms provide excellent tactical mobility
which will allow the Light Cavalry to operate over long
distances. They also have great strategic mobility and can
be easily and quickly moved by aircraft into an operational
theatre. Each troop will have a potent mix of HMG, GMG and
GPMG providing their mounted repower. All Light Cavalry
soldiers will have the full issue of Future Integrated Soldier
Technology equipment ensuring they are highly effective
when operating dismounted. Each Support troop will deliver
Anti-Tank capability with Javelin and precision effect with
Snipers. DEWDROP and SSARF will provide thermal target
acquisition capabilities to assist with reconnaissance tasks.

Infrastructure. All Light Cavalry Regiments will be UK based
from 2015, with LD in Catterick, SCOTS DG in Leuchars and
QDG in Swanton Morley. This basing solution will ensure that
the regiments are closer to their recruiting areas, have easy
access to training facilities and will be close to their paired
Yeomanry regiments.
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The Light Protected
Mobility Battalion
Doctrine. The Light Protected Mobility (PM) capability,
comprising Regular and Reserve infantry battalions will
be unique and critical in the new Army 2020 structure.
The integrated battalion will provide a highly deployable
wheeled battlegroup capability nested within four of the
infantry brigades in 1 (UK) Division, as part of the
Adaptable Force.They will be prepared for numerous roles,
such as reinforcing task forces or being the lead elements
of an overseas operation where dismounted troops or
tracked vehicles may not be the best options.
Organisation. Light PM battalions will be fully integrated
with their Reserve paired battalion, from the outset of the
re-role to Light PM. By 2018, the Reserve will be providing
fully capable platoons to each Light PM Rie company, and
sections to Support company, during key collective training
exercises and on operational deployments. Additionally, Light
PM Regular battalions will receive a signicant uplift to their
REME Light Aid Detachments.
Training. The integrated battalion will operate in a 3
year readiness cycle. The Training year, with events such
as Exercise WESSEX STORM on Salisbury Plain, will be
followed by a Committed year, where the integrated
battalion will be prepared to deploy to new operational
tasks. A year of Other Tasks will follow, focussed on
individual skills, driver training, career courses and support
to other units training. Drivers and commanders will be
trained in unit lines by Driving and Maintenance Instructors
who will be NCOs, specially selected from within the
companies of both the Regular and Reserve battalions,
who have attended courses delivered at the Armour Centre
in Bovington. Integrated cadres will be conducted locally,
with collective training taking place on local training areas,
Salisbury Plain and overseas.
Equipment. Light PM battalions will be equipped with a wide
variety of PM vehicles including Foxhound and Ridgeback
for Rie companies and battlegroup headquarters, Husky for
the Mortar platoon and RWMIK+ for the Reconnaissance,
Sniper, Anti-Tank and Machine Gun platoons. By 2018 many
of these vehicles will have been upgraded for contingency
roles with improvements such as new suspensions and vehicle
mounted radios. Other kit that is currently tted to vehicles
in Afghanistan will continue to be available such as the
BOOMERANG shot detection system and Vehicle Mounted
ISTAR. Initially, all PM vehicles will be held in the Regular
battalions but as capability increases it may become possible to
transfer elements to Reserve units.
Logistics. Battlegroup CSS will be far more responsive with
the introduction of PM vehicles, including Husky and new
MAN SV recovery vehicles. A1 and A2 echelons will be
wheeled, similar to those of Armoured Infantry battalions
and Future Battleeld Ambulance (FBFA) will operate in
company and regimental aid posts.
Infrastructure. Pairing between the Regular and Reserve
battalions will be based on geographic locations, as opposed
to cap-badge, to best support the integrated delivery of the
Light PM capability. The Light PM battalion locations will be
balanced around the UK with a number moving location prior
to 2018 (1 WG and 3 RIFLES) with Queens and Kings Division
battalions continuing to rotate through Cyprus.
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The Light Infantry Battalion
Doctrine. Regular and Reserve Light Infantry will continue
to be at the core of the modern Armys combat capability.
Under Army 2020, they will train and operate together as
integrated battalions. The Light Infantrys primary role will
remain to close with and defeat the enemy in close combat.
It will be especially suitable for operations in complex terrain
but will also be trained and prepared for a wide range of
tasks including mentoring or partnering with another nations
forces, providing security to vital locations and reinforcing high
readiness forces such as the Lead Armoured Task Force or 16
Air Assault Brigade.
Organisation. Light Infantry battalions will be nested in
the seven infantry brigades of 1 (UK) Division, as part of
the Adaptable Force. An integrated battalion will consist
of both Regular and Reserve elements delivering up to four
Rie companies, a Fire Support company and a Headquarters
company. The integrated Light Infantry Rie company will
consist of three Rie platoons, one of which will be found
from the Reserve, and a Machine Gun platoon.
Fire Support company includes the specialist Reconnaissance,
Sniper, Anti-Tank, Assault Pioneer and Mortar platoons. The
Headquarters company exists to command and sustain the
battalion, supported by specialist platoons including the
Communications and Information Systems platoon, ISTAR
platoon, a Mobility Support and Training Wing and the
Quartermasters department.
Integrating with combat support and CSS elements generates
a highly capable and exible battlegroup capable of a wide
variety of missions from war-ghting to stabilisation operations.
Training. A Light Infantry battalion will operate in a three
year readiness cycle. In the Training Year the battalion will
conduct integrated section and platoon level training. Live
ring and other collective training, including command post
exercises, will take place in preparation for deployment on
an overseas exercise to train as integrated companies in a
battle group context. A Committed year will follow, with a
wide variety of tasks available, such as integrated company
group deployments as the Falkland Islands Roulement Infantry
Company, overseas training exercises to reinforce links with
allies, or other deployments overseas on an operational tour
or short term training task. Supporting other units training
and ensuring career courses are undertaken will be priorities
in the Other Tasks year. Training in this period will focus upon
maintaining individual and specialist skills of both Regular and
Reserve elements in barracks and on local training areas.
Equipment. By 2018, Regular and Reserve Light Infantry
battalions will be equipped to the same standard, with a
range of modern equipment. Together these systems will
enable the light infantryman to out-see, out-think and
out-ght the enemy.
Personal Equipment. A lot of the excellent personal
equipment used on recent operations will continue to be
elded to the Infantry. A ghting knife will be introduced
to service from 2015 in order to allow engagements at
the closest ranges, in hand-to-hand combat, along with
training designed to foster controlled aggression and
condence in light infantrymen.
Protection. Commanders will be trained and expected
to select the appropriate PPE for the mission from
systems such as the current ECBA and Osprey and,
in due course, the new VIRTUS system which will begin
to enter service from 2015.
Firepower. Weapon systems will be complemented by
Future Integrated Soldier Technology surveillance and
target acquisition equipment, allowing infantry soldiers
to see, move and ght at night and detect enemy
forces at increased ranges. The SA80 assault rie will be
upgraded and trials are being run to see if it is possible to
t suppressors to all section weapons.
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Mobility. TTPs will be reviewed to drive down the weight
for the Light Infantry soldier in the assault to no more than
25kg. This will be delivered by reducing the amount of
equipment expected to be carried and enhancing resupply
in the eld, including learning how to make best use of
increased numbers of quad bikes.
Specialist Equipment. The Light Infantry soldier will
be trained to operate increasingly sophisticated
equipment, such as the Black Hornet nano-UAS, with
Light Infantry platoons operating the system during their
exercises in Kenya.
Dismounted Situational Awareness (DSA). The DSA
system will replace Bowman at company level and below.
With this equipment commanders will be able to quickly
and intuitively see where all of their men are, share
information about enemy forces and develop tactical plans.
Infrastructure. By 2018 Light Infantry battalions will
predominantly be based in their permanent A2020 locations.
Extensive investment in some of the key training areas such
as Salisbury Plain and Kenya will be complete in a similar
timeframe. Units can expect to see larger and more demanding
urban training villages to train in, which will be essential
if the Light Infantry are to specialise in ghting in complex
terrain. The Dismounted Close Combat Trainer will continue
to be developed to ensure all weapons systems and sights are
represented and the range of shoots available are realistic,
demanding and reinforce marksmanship skills. The Small Arms
Range Target System will be replacing current range targets
with smart targetry, providing feedback on eld ring effect.
Committed Forces. Light Infantry battalions will remain
committed in Cyprus and Brunei. Two Foot Guards battalions
and the permanent Public Duties Incremental Companies
(including Balaklava Company formed from 5 SCOTS) will
continue to conduct State Ceremonial and Public Duties tasks,
working on a 3 year rotation.
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UNIT ROTATION AS AT 1 SEPT 16
16 Air Assault Brigade
1st (United Kingdom) Division
Combat Units
All locations shown are planned nal locations, Reserve units are in black, pairing is shown by shaded boxes

HQ 51st Infantry
Brigade & HQ
Scotland
(Edinburgh)
HQ 7
th
Infantry
Brigade & HQ
East
(Chilwell)
HQ 4
th
Infantry
Brigade & HQ
North East
(Catterick)
HQ 11
th
Infantry
Brigade & HQ
South East
(Aldershot)
HQ 38
th
(Irish)
Brigade
(Lisburn)
HQ 42
nd
Infantry
Brigade & HQ
North West
(Preston)
HQ 160
th

Infantry Brigade
& HQ Wales
(Brecon)
Role
Light Cavalry
The Royal Scots
Dragoon Guards
(Carabiniers and
Greys)
(Leuchars)
1
st
The Queens
Dragoon Guards
(Swanton Morley)
The Light Dragoons
(Catterick)
Reserve Light Cavalry
The Royal Mercian
and Lancastrian
Yeomanry
1
(Edinburgh)
The Royal Yeomanry
(London)
The Queens Own
Yeomanry
(Newcastle)
Light Protected
Mobility
3
rd
Battalion
The Ries
(Edinburgh)
2
nd
Battalion
The Royal Anglian
Regiment
(Cottesmore)
2
nd
Battalion
The Yorkshire
Regiment
(Catterick)
1
st
Battalion
Welsh Guards
(Pirbright)
Reserve Light Role
Infantry
5th Battalion
The Royal Regiment
of Fusiliers
(Newcastle)
3rd Battalion
The Royal Anglian
Regiment
(Bury St Edmunds)
4th Battalion
The Yorkshire
Regiment
(York)
3rd Battalion
The Royal Welsh
(Cardiff)
Light Protected
Mobility
The Black Watch
3
rd
Battalion
The Royal Regiment
of Scotland
(Fort George)
1
st
Battalion
The Royal Irish
Regiment
(Tern Hill)
Reserve Light Role
Infantry
51st Highland,
7th Battalion
The Royal Regiment
of Scotland
(Perth)
2nd Battalion
The Royal Irish
Regiment
(Lisburn)
Light Role Infantry
The Royal Highland
Fusiliers
2
nd
Battalion
The Royal Regiment
of Scotland
(Edinburgh)
1
st
Battalion
The Royal Anglian
Regiment
(Woolwich)
1
st
Battalion
Grenadier Guards
(Aldershot)
The Royal Scots
Borderers
1
st
Battalion
The Royal Regiment
of Scotland
(Belfast)
2
nd
Battalion
The Mercian
Regiment
(Chester)
1
st
Battalion
The Ries
(Chepstow)
Reserve Light Role
Infantry
52nd Lowland,
6th Battalion
The Royal Regiment
of Scotland
(Glasgow)
3rd Battalion
The Princess of
Waless Royal
Regiment
(Canterbury)
The London
Regiment
(Westminster)
UNPAIRED
4th Battalion
The Mercian
Regiment
(Wolverhampton)
6th Battalion
The Ries
(Exeter)
Light Role Infantry
1
st
Battalion
The Royal Gurkha
Ries
(Shorncliffe)
2
nd
Battalion
The Ries
(Ballykinler)
2
nd
Battalion
The Duke of
Lancasters
Regiment
(Weeton)
Reserve Light Role
Infantry
UNPAIRED
7th Battalion
The Ries
(Reading)
4th Battalion
The Duke of
Lancasters
Regiment
(Preston)
Cyprus
1
st
Battalion The Duke of
Lancasters Regiment
(Episkopi)
2
nd
Battalion The Princess of
Waless Royal Regiment
(Dhekalia)
Brunei
2
nd
Battalion The Royal Gurkha Ries
(Brunei)
State Ceremonial and
Public Duties
Balaklava Company, The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders,
5
th
Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland
(Edinburgh)
HQ London District (Whitehall)
State Ceremonial and
Public Duties
Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment
(Knightsbridge)
The Kings Troop
Royal Horse Artillery
(Woolwich)
1
st
Battalion
Coldstream Guards
(Windsor)
1
st
Battalion Irish
Guards
(Hounslow)
Public Duties
Incremental
Companies
(London)
3rd (United Kingdom) Division
Combat Units
22 | Co mb a t Ca p a b i l i t y f o r t h e F u t u r e Co mb a t Ca p a b i l i t y f o r t h e F u t u r e | 23
1. Remaining Paderborn Garrison based 20 Armoured Infantry Brigade units will move to their UK locations from 2017.
All locations shown are planned nal locations, Reserve units are in black, pairing is shown by shaded boxes
1
st
Armoured Infantry Brigade
(Tidworth)
12
th
Armoured Infantry Brigade
(Bulford)
20
th
Armoured Infantry Brigade
1
(Bulford)
Role
Armoured Cavalry
Household Cavalry Regiment
(Windsor)
The Royal Lancers
(Catterick)
The Royal Dragoon Guards
(Catterick)
Armour
The Royal Tank Regiment
(Tidworth)
The Kings Royal Hussars
(Tidworth)
The Queens Royal Hussars
(The Queens Own & Royal Irish)
(Tidworth)
Reserve
Royal Wessex Yeomanry
(Bovington)
Armoured Infantry
1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of
Fusiliers
(Tidworth)
1st Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment
(Warminster)
5th Battalion The Ries
(Bulford)
Armoured Infantry
1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment
(Bulford)
1st Battalion The Royal Welsh
(Tidworth)
1st Battalion The Princess of Waless Royal
Regiment
(Bulford)
Heavy Protected
Mobility
4
th
Battalion The Ries
(Aldershot)
1st Battalion Scots Guards
(Aldershot)
The Highlanders, 4th Battalion The Royal
Regiment of Scotland
(Catterick)
16 Air Assault Brigade
(Colchester)
Role
Parachute
2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment
(Colchester)
3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment
(Colchester)
Reserve Parachute
Battalion
4th Battalion The Parachute Regiment
(Pudsey)
Infantry Unit Rotation: Units will also be drawn from across the Adaptable Force to full the standing commitments in Cyprus and Brunei as well as State Ceremonial and Public Duties.
There will be two Cyprus rotations: the rst between 1 LANCS, 2 LANCS and 2 YORKS and the second between 2 PWRR, 1 R ANGLIAN and 2 R ANGLIAN. 1 RGR and 2 RGR will continue
to rotate through Brunei; and State Ceremonial and Public Duties will be provided by two of the ve Foot Guards battalions and the incremental companies in London and Scotland.
1. A replacement proposed title is being staffed and will be considered for endorsement
Question on future Combat Capability?
Capability Directorate Combat XO
DII: Army CapCbt-0Group Mailbox
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