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Report of the

External Review
for
Hainerberg Elementary School
Unit 29647
Box 0086
APO, AE, 09096-0005
US
Mrs. Penelope Miller-Smith, Principal
Date: May 5, 2014 - May 8, 2014
North Central Association on Accreditation and School Improvement (NCA CASI), Northwest Accreditation Commission
(NWAC), and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Council on Accreditation and School Improvement (SACS
CASI) are accreditation divisions of AdvancED.
Document Generated On September 16, 2014


Copyright 2013 by Advance Education, Inc. AdvancED grants to the Institution, which is the subject of the
External Review Team Report, and its designees and stakeholders a non-exclusive, perpetual, irrevocable,
royalty-free license and release to reproduce, reprint, and distribute this report in accordance with and as
protected by the Copyright Laws of the United States of America and all foreign countries. All other rights not
expressly conveyed are reserved by AdvancED.
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Table of Contents


Introduction to the External Review 1

Findings 2
Accreditation Standards and Indicators 2
Learning Environment 34
Student Performance 35
Stakeholder Feedback 36

Conclusion 37
Summary of the External Review 37
Improvement Priority 42

Addenda 44
The External Review Team 44
Next Steps 45
Celebrating Accreditation 46
About AdvancED 46
References 47

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Introduction to the External Review

Accreditation is a voluntary method of quality assurance developed more than 100 years ago by American
universities and secondary schools and designed primarily to distinguish schools adhering to a set of educational
standards. Today the accreditation process is used at all levels of education and is recognized for its ability to
effectively drive student performance and continuous improvement in education.

Institutions seeking to gain or retain accreditation must meet AdvancED standards specified for their institution,
demonstrate high levels of student performance or improvement of student performance if applicable, and provide
evidence of stakeholder satisfaction with the operation of the institution. The accreditation standards focus on
conditions and processes within a system that impact student performance and organizational effectiveness. The
power of AdvancED Performance Accreditation lies in the connections and linkages between and among the
standards, student performance, and stakeholder feedback.

Institutions participate in an External Review by a team of highly qualified evaluators who examine the institution's
adherence and commitment to the accreditation criteria. The External Review is the hallmark of AdvancED
Performance Accreditation as it energizes and equips the leadership and stakeholders of an institution to achieve
higher levels of performance and address those areas that may be hindering efforts to reach desired performance
levels. External Review is a rigorous process that includes examination of evidence and relevant data, interviews
with stakeholders, and observations of instruction, learning, and operations.

The AdvancED External Review Team used the AdvancED Accreditation Standards and Indicators and related
criteria to guide its evaluation, looking not only for adherence to standards but also for how the institution functioned
as a whole and embodied the practices and characteristics of quality.

Using the evidence at their disposal, the AdvancED External Review Team arrived at a set of findings contained in
this report. The report is presented in three sections: Findings, Conclusion, and Addenda.

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Findings

The Findings section presents the External Review Team's evaluation of the AdvancED Accreditation Standards
and Indicators. It includes Powerful Practices and Opportunities for Improvement identified by the External Review
Team, as well as evaluations of Student Performance, the Learning Environment, Stakeholder Feedback and
Assurances.

Accreditation Standards and Indicators

Standards help to delineate what matters. They provide a common language through which an education
community can engage in conversations about educational improvement, system effectiveness, and achievement.
They serve as a foundation for planning and implementing improvement strategies and activities and for measuring
success. AdvancED's Standards for Quality were developed by a committee comprised of effective educators and
leaders from the fields of practice, research, and policy who applied professional wisdom, deep knowledge of
effective practice, and the best available research to craft a set of robust standards that ensure excellence and
continuous improvement. Before implementation, the standards were reviewed by internationally recognized
experts in testing and measurement, teacher quality, and education research.

This section contains a detailed evaluation of each of AdvancED's Accreditation Standards and Indicators,
identification of Powerful Practices and Opportunities for Improvement related to each of the standards (if
appropriate), and a description of the evidence examined by the External Review team.

The AdvancED Standards and Indicators are the first of three primary areas of evaluation for AdvancED's
Performance Accreditation model. Using indicator-specific performance levels, the External Review Team
evaluates the degree to which the institution meets each indicator on a scale of 1 to 4. The scores assigned to the
indicators are averaged to arrive at a single score. This score, along with scores from evaluations of student
performance and stakeholder feedback, will be used to determine the accreditation status of the institution.

Average Indicator Score for this Institution 2.73
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Standard 1: The school maintains and communicates a purpose and direction that commit to high
expectations for learning as well as shared values and beliefs about teaching and learning.

Purpose and direction are critical to successful institutions. A study conducted in 2010 by the London-based
Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) reported that "in addition to improving performance, the
research indicates that having a sense of shared purpose also improves employee engagement" and that "lack of
understanding around purpose can lead to demotivation and emotional detachment, which in turn lead to a
disengaged and dissatisfied workforce."

AdvancED has found through its evaluation of best practices in 30,000 institutions around the world that a
successful institution commits to a shared purpose and direction and establishes expectations for student learning
that are aligned with the institutions' vision and supported by internal and external stakeholders. These
expectations serve as the focus for assessing student performance and overall institution effectiveness.
Standard 1
The school maintains and communicates a purpose and direction that commit to high expectations for learning as well as
shared values and beliefs about teaching and learning.
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
1.1 The school engages in a systematic, inclusive, and
comprehensive process to review, revise, and
communicate a school purpose for student success.
Accreditation Report
Examples of communications to
stakeholders about the school's
purpose (i.e. website,
newsletters, annual report,
student handbook)

Observations
Communication plan to
stakeholders regarding the
school's purpose

Interviews
Documentation or description of
the process for creating the
school's purpose including the
role of stakeholders

Purpose statements - past and


present

School Profile
Student / Parent Handbook
Vision statement displayed
throughout the school
Continuous School Improvement
(CSI website)
Homework / Grading Policy
(Grades 4 and 5)
Learning Skills Certificate of
Achievement

2.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
1.2 The school's leadership and staff commit to a culture
that is based on shared values and beliefs about
teaching and learning and supports challenging,
equitable educational programs and learning
experiences for all students that include achievement
of learning, thinking, and life skills.
Agendas and/or minutes that
reference a commitment to the
components of the school's
statement of purpose

Interviews
The school's statement of
purpose

Accreditation Report
School Profile
Student / Parent Handbook
Continuous School Improvement
(CSI) website
Homework / Grading Policy
(Grades 4 and 5)
Comprehensive School Action
Plan
Professional Development
Calendar

3.0
1.3 The school's leadership implements a continuous
improvement process that provides clear direction for
improving conditions that support student learning.
The school data profile
Agenda, minutes from
continuous improvement
planning meetings

Communication plan and


artifacts that show two-way
communication to staff and
stakeholders

Interviews
Accreditation Report
The school continuous
improvement plan

Student / Parent Handbook


Grade level common planning
period
DoDEA standards posted in
"student-friendly" language

3.0
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Powerful Practices Indicator
1. The schools Hainerberg High Five (HH5) Heroes program reflects a school-wide focus on
positive student behavioral expectations.
Parent and student interviews revealed that the HH5 program is a positive and effective
reflection of a school culture based on positive behavioral expectations and has a positive
impact on all students in the area of life skills. Teacher reflections indicate a focus on the
whole child using the HH5. One quote, the other things we teach and try to instill in our
students to help them become successful in life: love of learning, sense of belonging to a
team, empathy, cooperation, sharing responsibility, accountability, sense of
accomplishments, teamwork, hard work, perseverance, patience, pride, meaning of
practice, learning how to simply co-exist, reinforcement and sometimes teaching of
manners, tolerance/acceptance of others, organizational skills, discipline, expectations,
different ways to learn, and countless other skills and feelings. Parents and students
could discuss specific actions that lead to a HH5 award. When students were asked
about the HH5 they either could state a specific action they were working on, or they could
go to a chart found throughout the building to point the the action(s) they used both in the
classroom and other areas of the school. Parents reported that children who received the
"Hero Award" were excited and thrilled and that the Hero Award was a positive influence
beyond the school doors. Students who experience a positive learning environment tend
to be happier, demonstrate a confident and engaged response to learning which ultimately
has a positive influence on overall achievement.
1.2
Opportunities for Improvement Indicator
1. Expand the schools "Hainerberg High Five" (HH5) program that reflects a school-wide
focus on positive student behavioral expectations to include academic success.
Parent and student interviews revealed that the HH5 program is an effective reflection of a
school culture based on positive behavioral expectations. During interviews, parents and
students responded in a very positive manner to the HH5 program. One parent remarked
that the program provides a motivation for her student that resulted in positive behavior
both at school and at home. Many parents shared similar experiences. Students
articulated how they used HH5 for actions in the classroom, lunchroom and playground.
They could identify specifics of the program or could show them on a chart. However,
neither students or parents could explain how to be successful in academics. Because
the HH5 is so well-accepted by all stakeholders, it provides a basis for the next step
forward -- linking it to student success in academics by extending the HH5 concept to
identify specific actions that result in achievement in the school's goals in mathematics
and English / Language Arts. Interview comments and records indicate that the HH5
program is reviewed and refined yearly.
A clearly communicated purpose in both academics and behavior creates a positive
learning environment that helps students experience and demonstrate a confident and
engaged response to learning.
1.1
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Standard 2: The school operates under governance and leadership that promote and support student
performance and school effectiveness.

Governance and leadership are key factors in raising institutional quality. Leaders, both local administrators and
governing boards/authorities, are responsible for ensuring all learners achieve while also managing many other
facets of an institution. Institutions that function effectively do so without tension between the governing
board/authority, administrators, and educators and have established relationships of mutual respect and a shared
vision (Feuerstein & Opfer, 1998). In a meta-analysis of educational institution leadership research, Leithwood and
Sun (2012) found that leaders (school and governing boards/authority) can significantly "influence school conditions
through their achievement of a shared vision and agreed-on goals for the organization, their high expectations and
support of organizational members, and their practices that strengthen school culture and foster collaboration within
the organization." With the increasing demands of accountability placed on institutional leaders, leaders who
empower others need considerable autonomy and involve their communities to attain continuous improvement
goals. Leaders who engage in such practices experience a greater level of success (Fink & Brayman, 2006).
Similarly, governing boards/authorities that focus on policy-making are more likely to allow institutional leaders the
autonomy to make decisions that impact teachers and students and are less responsive to politicization than
boards/authorities that respond to vocal citizens (Greene, 1992).

AdvancED's experience gained through evaluation of best practices has indicated that a successful institution has
leaders who are advocates for the institution's vision and improvement efforts. The leaders provide direction and
allocate resources to implement curricular and co-curricular programs that enable students to achieve expectations
for their learning. Leaders encourage collaboration and shared responsibility for school improvement among
stakeholders. The institution's policies, procedures, and organizational conditions ensure equity of learning
opportunities and support for innovation.
Standard 2
The school operates under governance and leadership that promote and support student performance and school
effectiveness.
Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
2.1 The governing body establishes policies and supports
practices that ensure effective administration of the
school.
Staff handbooks
Accreditation Report
Interviews
3.0
2.2 The governing body operates responsibly and
functions effectively.
Interviews
Governing body training plan
Findings of internal and external
reviews of compliance with laws,
regulations, and policies

Presentation by District
Superintendent

3.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
2.3 The governing body ensures that the school
leadership has the autonomy to meet goals for
achievement and instruction and to manage day-to-
day operations effectively.
Roles and responsibilities of
school leadership

School improvement plan


developed by the school

Accreditation Report
Agendas and minutes of
meetings

Interviews
Weekly common planning
collaboration time for every
grade level is protected

3.0
2.4 Leadership and staff foster a culture consistent with
the school's purpose and direction.
Examples of collaboration and
shared leadership

Observations
Interviews
Examples of decisions in support
of the school's continuous
improvement plan

presentation and detailed


handout provided by the SILT

3.0
2.5 Leadership engages stakeholders effectively in
support of the school's purpose and direction.
Involvement of stakeholders in a
school improvement plan

Accreditation Report
Interviews
Collaboration meeting notes,
interviews with parents and
students

2.0
2.6 Leadership and staff supervision and evaluation
processes result in improved professional practice and
student success.
Examples of professional
development offerings and plans
tied specifically to the results
from supervision and evaluation

Governing body policy on


supervision and evaluation

Supervision and evaluation


documents with criteria for
improving professional practice
and student success noted

Representative supervision and


evaluation reports

Interviews
interview with Principal and
teachers

2.0
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Opportunities for Improvement Indicator
1. Develop and coordinate supervision and evaluation processes to support improved
professional practice and student success.
Interviews with teachers and principal found that, while the required evaluation process is
in place, one linked specifically to the academic goals and instructional practices identified
by the school improvement leadership team (SILT) is not in place. Adding a specific
observation tool for use by peer teams and building administrators will help the school
build consistent use of research or best practice instructional delivery models across all
grade levels and will have a positive effect student achievement.
2.6
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Standard 3: The school's curriculum, instructional design, and assessment practices guide and ensure
teacher effectiveness and student learning.

A high-quality and effective educational system has services, practices, and curriculum that ensure teacher
effectiveness. Research has shown that an effective teacher is a key factor for learners to achieve to their highest
potential and be prepared for a successful future. The positive influence an effective educator has on learning is a
combination of "student motivation, parental involvement" and the "quality of leadership" (Ding & Sherman, 2006).
Research also suggests that quality educators must have a variety of quantifiable and intangible characteristics that
include strong communication skills, knowledge of content, and knowledge of how to teach the content. The
institution's curriculum and instructional program should develop learners' skills that lead them to think about the
world in complex ways (Conley, 2007) and prepare them to have knowledge that extends beyond the academic
areas. In order to achieve these goals, teachers must have pedagogical skills as well as content knowledge
(Baumert, J., Kunter, M., Blum, W., Brunner, M., Voxx, T., Jordan, A., Klusmann, U., Krauss, S., Nuebrand, M., &
Tsai, Y., 2010). The acquisition and refinement of teachers' pedagogical skills occur most effectively through
collaboration and professional development. These are a "necessary approach to improving teacher quality"
(Colbert, J., Brown, R., Choi, S., & Thomas, S., 2008). According to Marks, Louis, and Printy (2002), staff members
who engage in "active organizational learning also have higher achieving students in contrast to those that do not."
Likewise, a study conducted by Horng, Klasik, and Loeb (2010), concluded that leadership in effective institutions
"supports teachers by creating collaborative work environments." Institutional leaders have a responsibility to
provide experiences, resources, and time for educators to engage in meaningful professional learning that
promotes student learning and educator quality.

AdvancED has found that a successful institution implements a curriculum based on clear and measurable
expectations for student learning. The curriculum provides opportunities for all students to acquire requisite
knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Teachers use proven instructional practices that actively engage students in the
learning process. Teachers provide opportunities for students to apply their knowledge and skills to real world
situations. Teachers give students feedback to improve their performance.
Standard 3
The school's curriculum, instructional design, and assessment practices guide and ensure teacher effectiveness and student
learning.
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
3.1 The school's curriculum provides equitable and
challenging learning experiences that ensure all
students have sufficient opportunities to develop
learning, thinking, and life skills that lead to success at
the next level.
Lesson plans
Interviews
Accreditation Report
Learning expectations for
different courses

Posted learning objectives


Representative samples of
student work across courses

Course schedules
Observations
Descriptions of instructional
techniques

Collaborative team meeting


minutes / notes
Student support programs
Professional Development
documentation

2.0
3.2 Curriculum, instruction, and assessment are monitored
and adjusted systematically in response to data from
multiple assessments of student learning and an
examination of professional practice.
Observations
Common assessments
Interviews
Accreditation Report
Digital data boards
Data collection matrix
Assessment pyramid

2.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
3.3 Teachers engage students in their learning through
instructional strategies that ensure achievement of
learning expectations.
Teacher evaluation criteria
Agenda items addressing these
strategies

Professional development
focused on these strategies

Interviews
Observations
Student work demonstrating the
application of knowledge

Findings from supervisor walk-


thrus and observations

Accreditation Report
DoDEA standards in student-
friendly language
Student math journals
Mathematics lab
Rubrics
Math word walls

2.0
3.4 School leaders monitor and support the improvement
of instructional practices of teachers to ensure student
success.
Supervision and evaluation
procedures

Peer or mentoring opportunities


and interactions

Interviews
Administrative classroom
observation protocols and logs

Assistant principal -- peer-to-


peer process

2.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
3.5 Teachers participate in collaborative learning
communities to improve instruction and student
learning.
Common language, protocols
and reporting tools

Agendas and minutes of


collaborative learning
committees

Calendar/schedule of learning
community meetings

Observations
Peer coaching guidelines and
procedures

Interviews
Examples of improvements to
content and instructional practice
resulting from collaboration

CSI meeting agendas, exit slips


Monthly coaches meeting
minutes
Teacher Assistance Team (TAT)
meeting information

3.0
3.6 Teachers implement the school's instructional process
in support of student learning.
Observations
Interviews
Examples of learning
expectations and standards of
performance

Samples of exemplars used to


guide and inform student
learning

Rubrics
Lesson plans
Common Assessments

2.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
3.7 Mentoring, coaching, and induction programs support
instructional improvement consistent with the school's
values and beliefs about teaching and learning.
Records of meetings and walk
thrus/feedback sessions

Observations
Professional learning calendar
with activities for instructional
support of new staff

Descriptions and schedules of


mentoring, coaching, and
induction programs with
references to school beliefs and
values about teaching and
learning

Interviews
Grade-level common
collaboration time
Professional development 4th
Tuesday of each month
Minutes / Notes from meetings
"Menu" approach for
professional development topics
ISSP models best instructional
practices, research-based
materials, and data-driven
instruction

3.0
3.8 The school engages families in meaningful ways in
their children's education and keeps them informed of
their children's learning progress.
Interviews
List of varied activities and
communications modes with
families, e.g., info portal, online,
newsletters, parent centers,
academic nights, open house,
early release days

Calendar outlining when and


how families are provided
information on child's progress

Accreditation Report
Quarterly progress reports
Gradespeed postings
Weekly folders of student work

3.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
3.9 The school has a formal structure whereby each
student is well known by at least one adult advocate in
the school who supports that student's educational
experience.
Interviews
Master schedule with time for
formal adult advocate structure

Description of formal adult


advocate structures

Teacher Assistance Team (TAT)


notes

2.0
3.10 Grading and reporting are based on clearly defined
criteria that represent the attainment of content
knowledge and skills and are consistent across grade
levels and courses.
Observations
Interviews
Sample communications to
stakeholders about grading and
reporting

Policies, processes, and


procedures on grading and
reporting

Common grading policy (grades


4 and 5)
Rubrics (for some, but not all,
grade levels)

3.0
3.11 All staff members participate in a continuous program
of professional learning.
Interviews
Brief explanation of alignment
between professional learning
and identified needs

Accreditation Report
Crosswalk between professional
learning and school purpose and
direction

Observations
Minutes from grade-level
collaborative planning meetings
Professional development not
always directly focused on CSI
goals

3.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
3.12 The school provides and coordinates learning support
services to meet the unique learning needs of
students.
Interviews
List of learning support services
and student population served
by such services

Data used to identify unique


learning needs of students

TAT meeting minutes / notes


3.0
Powerful Practices Indicator
1. Teachers have opportunities to participate in mentoring, co-teaching, and coaching
initiatives to discuss current practices and ways that instruction might be improved.
Teachers consistently shared in interviews the importance of mentoring, coaching and co-
teaching from ISSP personnel and peers. Collaboration meetings provide opportunities
for teachers to discuss instructional strategies and identify elements for professional
development sessions. Several teachers indicated that the co-teaching model is an
effective way to extend instructional practices and to develop their research-based
practices. During interviews, some grade levels discussed, in detail, the use of cognitively
demanding activities learned from ISSP teachers who co-taught in their rooms. Records
of common planning meetings documented the efforts of some grade levels to utilized new
strategies based on the information they received from on-going assessments. Meeting
notes revealed that the use of learning skills rubrics, proposed in one grade level, were
scheduled for use in another grade for the 2014 - 2015 school year. Notes from common
planning meetings also showed that teachers at one grade level planned to practice using
ELEOT within their grade level. When staff members collaborate professionally and are
focused on best practice or research-based strategies that are in line with the schools
values and beliefs about teaching and learning, student achievement is likely to increase.
Such actions also provide consistency across all grade levels creating a dynamic learning
environment for students throughout the entire school.
3.7
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Opportunities for Improvement Indicator
1. Consistently engage students in their learning through instructional strategeis that ensure
achievement of learning expectations.
Use of school wide strategies, differentiated small group work, student portfolios, use of
computers for higher level activities, problem-based learning, and student friendly
standards were not seen consistently throughout the building. When all teachers use
these strategies deliberately, student engagement is high and long-term memory and
learning are invoked.
3.3
2. Expand the mentoring, co-teaching and coaching initiatives to support instructional
improvement consistent with the schools values and beliefs about teaching and learning.
Teachers at some grade levels who are currently involved in these initiatives stated that
there is documented measurable and meaningful student success. The external review
team observed high levels of engagement in rooms where coaching is taking place.
Artifacts indicated that students involved in classrooms where these initiatives take place
performed better on local academic assessments. Observations of these classrooms
noted higher levels of student engagement and the use of more cognitively engaging
materials. While this is a powerful practice for the school, an opportunity to improve it by
expanding it horizontally and vertically would be a next step in continuous improvement.
When consistent mentoring, co-teaching and coaching initiatives are implemented
throughout a school, research shows such fidelity to practice can have a positive influence
on student achievement.
3.7
3. Provide additional opportunities for families to be engaged in meaningful ways in their
childrens education and keep parents informed of their childrens learning progress in a
consistent manner throughout the school.
Parent interviews indicated that communication between home and school regarding
childrens progress is inconsistently reported other than established grading period
reports. Parent interviews also indicated that they are not familiar with their childrens
learning expectations in a consistent manner. Parents reported that some grade levels
provided detailed information and data portfolios and others did not. Interviews with
parents found little or no participation with the development of the school vision or the
academic goals. External review team observations and interviews showed students were
not able to communicate their learning standards or how they are assessed. They are
unable to share this information with their families on a continuous basis, stating that
report cards were the way they knew they were doing OK. While consistent use of
report cards is an accepted educational practice, a continuous improvement process
would have a more timely, ongoing and consistent way to track student progress
throughout the year. When a school actively and regularly engages families in meaningful
ways to keep them informed of the academic goals for the school and with their childrens
learning progress on a consistent basis, research shows that student achievement is likely
to increase.
3.8
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4. Structure the schools instructional process in support of student learning.
The CSI handout provided to the team included a list of school-wide strategies that are
used throughout the school (i.e., small group differentiated instruction for mathematics and
English / language arts; collaboration with coaches for co-teaching; project-based
learning; standards presented in student-friendly language). Students in some
classrooms were well into the use of these strategies and while students in other
classrooms were not. Parents shared in interviews that the quality of the instructional
process is not consistent throughout the school. Parent interviews conducted in four
different locations provided a clear theme: inconsistent instruction throughout the school.
Comments about the use of worksheets that required no real thinking were common.
Many parents stated that students who finished early were told to read a book or help
another student. Parents felt that their students were all doing the same work with little
done to address the students who finished quickly or could already do the work. Yet other
parents stated that their children were doing projects and work that was challenging.
Based on student interviews it was apparent students were not knowledgeable about how
they were assessed or why what they are learning was relevant. Most students reported
work as easy, and that when they were done they could read a book or, in some classes,
do games on the computer. Observations in many classrooms found highly engaging
environments and students who could discuss their learning; however, in other
classrooms students could not articulate why they were doing the work or what standard
they were working on. Observations in other classrooms found highly engaging
environments and students who could discuss their learning. External review team
members observed in some classrooms that students were not engaged in rigorous
coursework, discussions or tasks that were challenging and attainable. The school shared
artifacts that indicated lack of common planning guides and assessments across all
curricular areas for all grade levels. Lesson plan artifacts did not indicate consistency of
instructional practices throughout all grade levels. Building onto the research-based
instructional processes that support student learning in some grade levels is a next step.
When a consistent structure of instructional processes is in place throughout the building,
there are opportunities to increase student achievement and meet the goals of a 21st
Century learning community.
3.6
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Standard 4: The school has resources and provides services that support its purpose and direction to
ensure success for all students.

Institutions, regardless of their size, need access to sufficient resources and systems of support to be able to
engage in sustained and meaningful efforts that result in a continuous improvement cycle. Indeed, a study
conducted by the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (Pan, D., Rudo, Z., Schneider, C., & Smith-
Hansen, L., 2003) "demonstrated a strong relationship between resources and student success... both the level of
resources and their explicit allocation seem to affect educational outcomes."

AdvancED has found through its own evaluation of best practices in the 30,000 institutions in the AdvancED
network that a successful institution has sufficient human, material, and fiscal resources to implement a curriculum
that enables students to achieve expectations for student learning, meets special needs, and complies with
applicable regulations. The institution employs and allocates staff members who are well qualified for their
assignments. The institution provides a safe learning environment for students and staff. The institution provides
ongoing learning opportunities for all staff members to improve their effectiveness. The institution ensures
compliance with applicable governmental regulations.
Standard 4
The school has resources and provides services that support its purpose and direction to ensure success for all students.
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
4.1 Qualified professional and support staff are sufficient
in number to fulfill their roles and responsibilities
necessary to support the school's purpose, direction,
and the educational program.
Interviews
Policies, processes, procedures
and other documentation related
to the hiring, placement and
retention of professional and
support staff

Accreditation Report
Assessments of staffing needs
Documentation of highly
qualified staff

Administration supervision roster


/ Matrix of administrative
responsibilities for the principal
and assistant principal
Hiring / Selection processes
Welcome letter to new faculty
members
School Profile, District / School
Presentations -- Faculty
demographic information
Job Descriptions

3.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
4.2 Instructional time, material resources, and fiscal
resources are sufficient to support the purpose and
direction of the school.
Examples of efforts of school
leaders to secure necessary
material and fiscal resources

School schedule
Interviews
Alignment of budget with school
purpose and direction

School calendar
Purchase logs -- Fiscal Years
2014, 2013, 2012
School Year 2013 - 2014 Extra
Duty Compensation information
Minutes of leadership team
meetings
Class schedules
Teaching and learning resources
/ technology inventories

3.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
4.3 The school maintains facilities, services, and
equipment to provide a safe, clean, and healthy
environment for all students and staff.
Documentation of compliance
with local and state inspections
requirements

Interviews
Documentation of emergency
procedures such as fire drills,
evacuation and other emergency
procedures.

System for maintenance


requests

Maintenance schedules
Safety committee
responsibilities, meeting
schedules, and minutes

Equipment maintenance records


-- health office, AED equipment
and protocol
Field trip safety protocols
Health screening / referral
records -- hearing, vision, dental,
flu vaccines
Recycling Club and Green Boot
Award

3.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
4.4 Students and school personnel use a range of media
and information resources to support the school's
educational programs.
Interviews
Budget related to media and
information resource acquisition

Observations
Data on media and information
resources available to students
and staff

Schedule of staff availability to


assist students and school
personnel related to finding and
retrieving information

Samples of student work posted


throughout the school / on the
website
Technology Plan
Technology Committee records
Technology Binder for
Assistance to Students and
Teachers
Computer lab schedules
Overviews of technology
knowledge and skills expected
from students: Grades K - 2,
Grades 3 - 5
Media Center availability for
students and parents
Star Lab

4.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
4.5 The technology infrastructure supports the school's
teaching, learning, and operational needs.
Technology plan and budget to
improve technology services and
infrastructure

Observations
Assessments to inform
development of technology plan

Policies relative to technology


use

Interviews
Records of technology use for
teaching and learning as well as
communication
Technology committee records
Computer lab schedule
Records of software applications
available for students and
teachers (Audacity, Brain Pop,
Everyday Math, IXL Math,
Kidspiration, Pearson, Pixie3,
RazKids, Spelling City)
Examples of student work
posted throughout the school
and on the website
Teacher-created online
resources

3.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
4.6 The school provides support services to meet the
physical, social, and emotional needs of the student
population being served.
Student assessment system for
identifying student needs

Agreements with school


community agencies for student-
family support

Social classes and services,


e.g., bullying, character
education

List of support services available


to students

Observations
Hainerberg High Five Heroes
program
Bully Prevention program
Red Ribbon Week
Discipline referral process /
procedures
Grade level common planning
records
Student / Parent Support
Programs: Preschool Children
with Disabilities (PSCD), Sure
Start
Instructional Coaches -- math,
literacy
Military Family Life Counselors
Rosie the Therapy Dog
Teacher Assistance Team (TAT)
Resources: meeting schedules,
checklists, TAT plan completion
tips, parent invitations
Counselor / psychologist
schedule

3.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
4.7 The school provides services that support the
counseling, assessment, referral, educational, and
career planning needs of all students.
List of services available related
to counseling, assessment,
referral, educational, and career
planning

Budget for counseling,


assessment, referral,
educational and career planning

Description of IEP process


Description of referral process
TAT team meeting minutes and
intervention plans
Hainerberg High Five Heroes
school-wide behavior incentive
program
IEP / 504 Assessment and
Intervention Plans
Counselors / Military Family Life
Counselors
Counseling Resources
Brochures
Coach support -- math, literacy

3.0
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Powerful Practices Indicator
1. Students, teachers, and parents have access to exceptional collections of media and
information resources in digital and non-digital formats in the media center as well as in all
classrooms.
Students use both digital and non-digital materials to facilitate their learning, to conduct
research, and to make connections between their learning and the real-world. External
review team members observed students in the media center at various times throughout
the days of the review. Students were using computers as well as traditional print
resources and other library materials; team members also observed many examples of
student work posted throughout the school that demonstrate student competence with
computer applications appropriate to their age and experience. The media specialist and
gifted / talented teacher worked with students in the media center to support their requests
for resources and other assistance with their learning. Teachers reported that the media
specialist works with teachers on request to prepare content-specific resources for student
use. Circulation records confirm that the school has the third highest circulation rate in
DoDEA. External review team members observed plentiful print resources in classroom
collections. The principal shared that the school has benefited from acquisition of leveled
books from the two schools whose students and teachers are now part of Hainerberg
Elementary Schools; in fact, the leveled book room occupies one-half of a double-wide.
Grade level team members spend one common planning time meeting each month
selecting leveled books for use during the next month. The media specialist confirmed
that parents may receive an open account to check out materials from the media center
and that many do!! Opportunities for parents to visit the media center are provided
immediately following the school day. Reviews of records and information shared in
interviews confirms that the school has adequate software licenses and makes purchases
based on student and teacher needs. Students in schools that provide sufficient digital
and non-digital resources are more likely to become skilled users of these resources to
manage their own learning.
4.4
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Standard 5: The school implements a comprehensive assessment system that generates a range of data
about student learning and school effectiveness and uses the results to guide continuous improvement.

Systems with strong improvement processes move beyond anxiety about the current reality and focus on priorities
and initiatives for the future. Using results, i.e., data and other information, to guide continuous improvement is key
to an institution's success. A study conducted by Datnow, Park, and Wohlstetter (2007) from the Center on
Educational Governance at the University of Southern California indicated that data can shed light on existing areas
of strength and weakness and also guide improvement strategies in a systematic and strategic manner (Dembosky,
J., Pane, J., Barney, H., & Christina, R., 2005). The study also identified six key strategies that performance-driven
systems use: (1) building a foundation for data-driven decision making, (2) establishing a culture of data use and
continuous improvement, (3) investing in an information management system, (4) selecting the right data, (5)
building institutional capacity for data-driven decision making, and (6) analyzing and acting on data to improve
performance. Other research studies, though largely without comparison groups, suggested that data-driven
decision making has the potential to increase student performance (Alwin, 2002; Doyle, 2003; Lafee, 2002;
McIntire, 2002).

Through ongoing evaluation of educational institutions, AdvancED has found that a successful institution uses a
comprehensive assessment system based on clearly defined performance measures. The system is used to
assess student performance on expectations for student learning, evaluate the effectiveness of curriculum and
instruction, and determine strategies to improve student performance. The institution implements a collaborative
and ongoing process for improvement that aligns the functions of the school with the expectations for student
learning. Improvement efforts are sustained, and the institution demonstrates progress in improving student
performance and institution effectiveness.
Standard 5
The school implements a comprehensive assessment system that generates a range of data about student learning and
school effectiveness and uses the results to guide continuous improvement.
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
5.1 The school establishes and maintains a clearly defined
and comprehensive student assessment system.
Accreditation Report
Documentation or description of
evaluation tools/protocols

Interviews
Brief description of student
assessment system including
range of data produced from
standardized and local
assessments on student learning
and school performance

School Profile
Data Collection Matrix
Quarterly Assessments
Grade Level Assessment
Protocol Binders
Assessment Card for each
student

3.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
5.2 Professional and support staff continuously collect,
analyze, and apply learning from a range of data
sources, including comparison and trend data about
student learning, instruction, program evaluation, and
organizational conditions.
Interviews
Written protocols and
procedures for data collection
and analysis

Examples of use of data to


design, implement, and evaluate
continuous improvement plans
and apply learning

List of data sources related to


student learning, instruction,
program effectiveness, and
conditions that support learning

Common Assessment Fact


Sheet posted to the website
Grade level assessment binders
Student data cards
School profile
Posters of notes from CSI
Grade-level Collaboration
Meetings
Assessment calendar

3.0
5.3 Professional and support staff are trained in the
evaluation, interpretation, and use of data.
Policies specific to data training
Interviews
Professional learning schedule
specific to the use of data

Documentation of attendance
and training related to data use

Training materials specific to the


evaluation, interpretation, and
use of data

Terra Nova Assessment


Analysis Training documentation
Coaches Corner
Data carousel (CSI training)
Agenda for CSI Training Days

2.0
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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
5.4 The school engages in a continuousprocess to
determine verifiable improvement in student learning,
including readiness for and success at the next level.
Agendas, minutes of meetings
related to analysis of data

Description of process for


analyzing data to determine
verifiable improvement in student
learning

Accreditation Report
Examples of use of results to
evaluate continuous
improvement action plans

Evidence of student readiness


for the next level

Evidence of student growth


Interviews
School profile
Student / Parent Handbook
Grade Level "Data Drapes"

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Indicator Source of Evidence Performance
Level
5.5 Leadership monitors and communicates
comprehensive information about student learning,
conditions that support student learning, and the
achievement of school improvement goals to
stakeholders.
Communication plan regarding
student learning, conditions that
support learning, and
achievement of school
improvement goals to
stakeholders

Sample communications to
stakeholders regarding student
learning, conditions that support
learning, and achievement of
school improvement goals

School quality control


procedures for monitoring
information about student
learning, conditions that support
learning, and the achievement of
school improvement goals

Executive summaries of student


learning reports to stakeholder
groups

Interviews
Bi-weekly newsletters
Student Data Cards
Quarterly reports to parents
regarding student progress
toward DoDEA standards
Parent Teacher conferences

3.0
Opportunities for Improvement Indicator
1. Design and implement a rigorous, individualized professional development program
related to the evaluation, interpretation and use of data for all professional and support
staff.
The school maintains a data-rich environment and staff members are becoming more
practiced at using data for instructional decisions: this is a strong point for the school.
However, support staff members reported that they were not trained in use of data and
could and would use it in their work with students. Some teachers reported that they
understood Terra Nova data, but were not sure how to analyze or use their formative data.
Other teachers felt more comfortable with look at grade level formative data. Consistency
in this area is lacking. Continuing to train all professional and support staff members in
the use of data and the importance of the information it can provide will benefit the school
as it seeks to increase its student performance.
5.3
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Learning Environment

Every learner should have access to an effective learning environment in which she/he has multiple opportunities to
be successful. The Effective Learning Environments Observation Tool (ELEOT) measures the extent to which
learners are in an environment that is equitable, supportive, and well-managed. An environment where high
expectations are the norm and active learning takes place. It measures whether learners' progress is monitored
and feedback is provided and the extent to which technology is leveraged for learning.

Observations of classrooms or other learning venues are conducted for a minimum of 20 minutes per observation.
External Review Team members conduct multiple observations during the review process and provide ratings on
30 items based on a four-point scale. The following provides the aggregate average score across multiple
observations for each of the seven learning environments included in ELEOT.



ELEOT Ratings
A. Equitable
B. High
C. Supportive
D. Active
E. Progress
F. Well-Managed
G. Digital
ELEOT Ratings
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
2.58
2.37
2.79
2.77
2.51
2.86
1.52
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Student Performance

Student Performance on assessments is the second of three primary areas of evaluation for AdvancED's
Performance Accreditation model. Institutions are asked to collect and analyze student performance data, then
submit the data and the analyses to the External Review Team for review. The External Review Team evaluates
the quality of the assessments used by the institution, the degree to which the institution properly administered the
assessments, analyzed and acted on the results, and the overall performance of students using a set of rubrics.
The scale is from 1 (low performing) to 4 (high performing). Results of that evaluation are reported below.


Student Performance Evaluation
Evaluative Criteria Performance
Level
Assessment Quality 3.0
Test Administration 3.0
Quality of Learning 3.0
Equity of Learning 3.0
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Stakeholder Feedback

Stakeholder Feedback is the third of three primary areas of evaluation in AdvancED's Performance Accreditation
model. The AdvancED surveys are directly correlated to the AdvancED Accreditation Standards and Indicators;
they provide not only direct information about stakeholder satisfaction but also become a source of data for
triangulation by the External Review Team as it evaluates indicators.

Institutions are asked to collect and analyze stakeholder feedback data, then submit the data and the analyses to
the External Review Team for review. The External Review Team evaluates the quality of the administration of the
surveys by institution and the degree to which the institution analyzed and acted on the results. The scale is from 1
(low performing) to 4 (high performing). Results of that evaluation are reported below.



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Conclusion

Summary of the External Review


In off-site and on-site review sessions, the AdvancED External Review Team examined artifacts and
evidence provided by the institution. During the on-site portion of the review, the team reviewed additional
artifacts, collected and analyzed data from interviews, and conducted observations.

The external review at Hainerberg Elementary School started on Monday, May 5, 2014, with and in-brief from the
United States Army Garrison Commander; immediately following this in-brief, the Kaiserslautern District
Superintendent presented a district overview. The external review continued on Tuesday, May 6 with external
review team meetings and concluded with the oral exit report presented on Thursday, May 8. The organization,
structure, and processes developed and implemented by the school for the review ensured participation by
stakeholders and a commitment to continuous improvement by adherence to the AdvancED Standards. School
leaders shared the self-assessment, executive summary, assurances, and school improvement plan well in
advance of the review. During the external review, the team received additional information for each standard
provided in a very specific booklet developed by the School Improvement Leadership Team (SILT). Additionally,
school leaders and SILT team members provided specific information in the form of classroom artifacts, test
information and professional development plans. There was a determined effort by the school leaders to be open
and honest in all aspects of the review.

External review team members interviewed all stakeholder groups and conducted 70 classrooms using the
Effective Learning Environments Observation Tool (ELEOT). An unduplicated count of those interviewed includes:
1 district superintendent, 2 school administrators (principal and assistant principal), 80 teachers and other certified
staff members, 14 support staff members, 56 parents, 99 students in formal interviews, and 175 students in
informal conversations during classroom observations. The final total of interview and informal conversations came
to 427. In addition, the team had numerous conversations and dialogue with teachers, support staff members, and
administrators beyond the structured interview count cited above.

Using the evidence collected, the team engaged in dialogue and deliberations concerning the degree to
which the institution met the AdvancED Accreditation Standards and Indicators.

Looking for and identifying an overall theme for Hainerberg Elementary School (HES) the team found the issue of
systemic practice a prominent thread throughout the school; the several focus areas already identified by the
school are not yet consistently implemented.

Standard One:
The school maintains and communicates a purpose and direction that commit to high expectations for learning as
well as shared values and beliefs about teaching and learning. HES has a clearly communicated vision: 'Students,
Teachers and Parents...Learning for a Lifetime.' Awareness of the vision prevailed throughout the school with
teachers, students, staff and parents all able to state the vision or read it from posters and school spirit
paraphernalia. In addition, the HES High Five program had a strong positive presence in the school and was
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identified by students and parents as a motivator for positive student actions. The specificity of the program can
provide direction for the vision to include similar detailed actions in both reading and math for learning goals. The
recent creation of common planning periods allows teachers of all grade levels to commit to and carry out
continuous improvement goals and values about teaching by meeting both vertically and horizontally. Involving
other stakeholders as partners in this endeavor is a next step.

Standard Two:
Under the district umbrella, HES leaders are provided guidance to become effective in creating a school that
understands and uses data, is focused on the achievement of each student, and supports the shared leadership of
the school. One district goal is for both teachers and students to use data to support and monitor learning. These
themes are present in Hainerberg Elementary School. Furthermore, the school has the autonomy to meet those
goals as defined by their student population. Teachers and administrators define their purpose, mission and
achievement goals. As the school moves further into a data-rich, student-centered environment, defining what
"students need to know and understand" in all grade levels will gain impetus with the engagement of all
stakeholders.

Standard Three:
Standard Three: The school's curriculum, instructional design, and assessment practices guide and ensure teacher
effectiveness and student learning. HES has made considerable strides forward in adopting a data rich
environment, practicing differentiated instruction, and developing early literacy programs. Some grade levels have
added problem-based learning to push students to higher levels of cognitive demand. Some of these strong
practices benefit from the ability of teachers to analyze data and discuss next steps during regular collaboration
time. The addition of a collaborative common planning time is powerful practice for the school. It allows teachers,
on a weekly basis, to discuss student progress, instructional delivery and professional development needs. With
many strong research-based best instructional practices already adopted, the next thing to add is consistency.
Observations, interviews and analysis of the ELEOT scores showed that the use of the research-based learning
strategies by students in the classroom varied across grade levels. Making these strong practices both systematic
and systemic will move the school forward in its goal of reaching academic heights for each child who enters their
doors. While HES educators find a number of ways to engage families; conferences, home communications, web
page, and a wide variety of reports, parents were not included in deeper discussions of school vision, mission or
achievement. Adding more meaningful ways to engage parents can help the school unite all stakeholders in
moving achievement forward.

Standard Four:
With 84% of the teaching faculty have a Master's degree or higher and 64% of the paraprofessional staff with an
Associate degree or higher, Hainerberg Elementary School (HES) maintains a highly qualified staff who are caring
and devoted to their students. Instructional time is guarded with reading and mathematics minutes specified by the
school. Again, a common planning collaboration time is established on a weekly basis and has give the school's
teachers the ability to conduct collegial and professional discussions about the educational direction of the school
and more specifically about the achievement of students in the classroom. Mentioned earlier, the common
planning time in support of the purpose and direction of the school is a powerful practice for the school. Despite the
age and the demands made upon it with increased numbers of students and staff, the school building is a clean,
well-cared for environment. As the closing of other schools resulted in an increased population at HES, the media
center also benefited from the inclusion of books and other materials. The space is large and the number and
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kinds of materials exceptional. Additionally, media center personnel are accommodating to the needs of staff,
students and parents, making this a powerful practice for the school. While the school has a rich infrastructure of
technology, as witnessed by the number of computers and smart-boards in classrooms, the next step will be to
address the infrastructure with regards to how best to integrate its use with real and engaging activities for
students. Counseling services, and support for military families either in deployment or transition to other duty
posts was apparent. Parents and students were alike in their belief that teachers were caring and concerned for
children.

Standard Five:
The school, as part of the Kaiserslautern District, maintains a clearly defined and comprehensive assessment
system. In addition, school leaders and teachers have developed a "data culture," with teachers and principals
comfortable using data to make decisions. On the other hand, support personnel, a number of whom are highly
qualified and work directly with children, lack training in the use and interpretation of data. The uses of formative
assessments to track ongoing student progress are beginning to occur in some grade levels and making this
practice consistent throughout the school will make student experiences in all grade levels more consistent.
Collecting data about professional development, and technology uses and needs will help provide a continuous
process that will benefit both teachers and students.

During the on-site review, members of the External Review Team evaluated the learning environment by
observing classrooms and general operations of the institution. Using data from these observations, the
team evaluated the quality of instruction and learning that took place classified around seven constructs or
environments: equity, high expectations, support, engagement, progress monitoring and feedback,
management, and use of technology.

During the external review at Hainerberg Elementary School, the team visited all certified teachers and performed a
total of 70 classroom observations. Because the focus is on what students are doing, the observations do not
spotlight the actions of the teacher. Our team conversed with many students to determine what they knew and
understood of their learning and the standards they were working on.

The team followed the ELEOT stipulation of a minimum of twenty minutes in each classroom. The team ensured
that all areas of the ELEOT were marked before being recorded.

All of the 70 observations were combined and an average rating of each of the seven learning environments was
shared with the School during the exit report. The results were; Equitable Learning Environment (2.58), High
Expectations Environment (2.37), Supportive Learning Environment (2.79), Active Learning Environment (2.76),
Progress Monitoring and Feedback Environment (2.51), Well-Managed Learning Environment (2.86), and Digital
Learning Environment (1.52).

The results appear to be in alignment with practices, programs, and expectations the school has in place. The
ELEOT tool asks observers to look at what the student is doing, not what the teacher is doing in the classroom. A
study of the scores can provide a guide to the school in their realizing their vision to inspire curiosity and ambition
for life-long learning and preparation for the 21st Century in every student. In some classrooms students were
actively engaged in learning with hands-on experiences and knew what and why they were learning material while
in other classrooms they were not. Students and teachers were respectful of each other and the learning
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environment, the use of the Hainerberg High Five was present in all rooms and students could discuss how they
used it. While the school has ample technology, use by students at higher levels of cognition and independence
were not present. Applying the use of technology with regard to expressed interventions, summarizing, using
graphic organizers for comprehension and problem solving, or writing were sporadic rather then systemic.

In the past, accreditation reviews resulted in an accreditation recommendation on status. Labels such as advised,
warned, probation, or all clear were used to describe the status of a school relative to the criteria. Beginning with
school year, 2013-14, AdvancED is introducing a new framework to describe the result of an accreditation review.
Consistent with the modern focus of accreditation on continuous improvement with an emphasis on student
success, AdvancED introduces an innovative and state-of-the-art framework for diagnosing and revealing
institutional performance called the Index of Education Quality (IEQ). The IEQ is comprised of three domains of
performance: 1) the impact of teaching and learning on student performance; 2) the leadership capacity to govern;
and 3) use of resources to support and optimize learning. Therefore, your institution will no longer receive an
accreditation status. Instead, your institution will be accredited with an IEQ score. In the case where an institution
is failing to meet established criteria, the accreditation will be under review thereby requiring frequent monitoring.

The three domains of performance are derived from the AdvancED Standards and Indicators; the Analysis of
Student Performance; and the Engagement and Involvement of Stakeholders. Within each domain institutions will
be able to connect to the individual performance levels that are applied in support of the AdvancED Standards and
evaluative criteria. Within the performance levels are detailed descriptors that can be a valuable source of
guidance for continuous improvement. Upon review of the findings in this report, institutional leaders should work
with their staff to review and understand the evidence and rationale for each Required Action as well as the
corresponding pathway to improvement described in the performance levels of the selected Indicator.

The IEQ provides a new framework that recognizes and supports the journey of continuous improvement. Your
institution's IEQ is the starting point for continuous improvement. Your actions for improvement that have a positive
impact will be reflected in your IEQ score.

IEQ Institutional Score: 276

Teaching and Learning Impact: 267
(Standards 3 and 5; Student Performance Criteria)

Leadership Capacity: 267
(Standards 1 and 2; Stakeholder Engagement Criteria)

Resource Utilization: 314
(Standard 4)

Final Comments:
The team would like to give a very special thank you to the principal of Hainerberg Elementary School for her
generous hospitality, time and attention to detail. If we needed a document or feedback she saw to it that we had it
immediately. The video tour she created was excellent and saved valuable time for the team, as we could watch it
before arriving at the school. We hope the effort put forth on the video will benefit any visitors or newcomers! We
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also appreciated the thoughtfulness and efforts of the PTO volunteers who provided meals specific to the needs of
the team.

On behalf of AdvancED and our External Review Team thank you for committing to quality education for all
learners through your commitment to continuous improvement and the AdvancED accreditation process.

The External Review team recommends that Hainerberg Elementary School be accredited by the AdvancED
Accreditation Commission for a five-year term of accreditation.
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1.
2.
Improvement Priority

Enhance current practices of school leaders as they monitor, facilitate and support improvements of
instructional practices of teachers to ensure student success.

Related Indicator(s) or Assurance(s):
3.4 School leaders monitor and support the improvement of instructional practices of teachers to ensure
student success.

Description:
Parents shared concerns related to the inconsistency of teaching practices and communications, even among
teachers in the same grade level. Wording by parents during interviews consistently indicated that wide
differences exist throughout the school with regard to the level of cognitive demand, differentiation, homework
and understanding of student progress. Observations of classrooms noted that student engagement and
cognitive demand varied; instructional practices to engage students in high-level learning were inconsistent
across the school. In interviews, parents stated that some of their children were engaged in cognitively
demanding work while others did worksheets and then read when finished. In some classrooms the practice of
students demonstrating the understanding and use of data to assess progress were apparent; however, this
practice was not evident throughout the school. Interviews with teachers and administration indicated that
while the evaluation tool was consistently used, there was limited discussion relating to the use of it or other
formative data to change classroom practices. Some discussions about peer observations were noted during
interviews and in conversations at some grade levels; the practice is not school-wide. Some discussions
pointed to the importance of linking interventions from reading and math goals with a walk through observation
tool, but evidence of the use of such a tool was not seen. When school leaders study, monitor and enhance
the consistent use instructional practices in classrooms, ensure that practices are engaging students in the
oversight of their learning, and align practices with the schools values and beliefs about teaching and learning
they will enhance student learning across the school.


Extend and refine the current collaborative leadership model to consistently engage all stakeholders in
effectively support the school's purpose and direction.

Related Indicator(s) or Assurance(s):
2.5 Leadership engages stakeholders effectively in support of the school's purpose and direction.

Description:
Interviews of all stakeholder groups reflected a limited understanding of the schools purpose and direction.
While students could provide the vision statement, they could not articulate a connection between the
statement and the impact to their achievement or specific and measureable outcomes. Parents reported that
while they knew the vision statement, 'Students Teacher and Parents Learning for a Lifetime' they had little
input on its inception. They also stated that the vision, while understandable in the general sense of life-long
learning, did not translate to actions in the classroom. They stated that learning for a lifetime had meaning
within the Hainerberg High Five because both the children and parents could identify clear and easily
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3.
understandable actions. However, such clear and identifiable actions were lacking in most classrooms.
Students had the vision memorized, but when asked what it meant for them in the classroom, were unable to
articulate its meaning in reading, mathematics or other subject areas. Support staff members also reported that
they were not involved in defining or developing the vision statement and, while they understood it is working
overall, they did not know how it translated to their efforts with the learning of specific children. When leaders
consistently communicate effectively with appropriate and varied representatives from stakeholder groups,
provide opportunities for stakeholders to shape decisions, solicit feedback and respond to stakeholders and
work collaboratively on school improvement efforts, the schools purpose and direction can be united to effect
student achievement across all grade levels.


Monitor and systematically adjust instructional practices in response to data from multiple standards-based and
on-going formative assessment to student learning.

Related Indicator(s) or Assurance(s):
3.2 Curriculum, instruction, and assessment are monitored and adjusted systematically in response to data
from multiple assessments of student learning and an examination of professional practice.

Description:
Dedicated time for weekly common planning and grade level and horizontal collaboration are strengths of the
school. However, time allocated is not consistently focused on interpretation of data to change instructional
practices, track student progress on a timely basis or to differentiate instruction. Minutes from collaboration
meetings did not always reflect focused discussions or ways in which teachers plan to interpret or respond to
formative data. Although some grade level collaborations discussed formative data and made decisions for
differentiation, others did not. In some classrooms collaboration decisions impacted classroom instruction,
differentiation of centers, use of student portfolios to track progress -- and others did not. Likewise, the use of
formative data discussed during collaboration changed professional practice in some rooms, but not in others.
As a result of collaboration meetings, some grade levels used Instructional Systems Specialists to differentiate
instruction and provide instructional assistance and even job embedded professional development! Again, this
did not occur school-wide. While a needs assessment was used to guide professional development, the team
did not see indications that data was linked to the needs of students in the classroom; what instructional
practices will help students grow academically. When instructional practices are systematic and systemic, are
adjusted in response to data, student performance is more likely to increase. Expanding the collaboration
process, already well in place, to become more systematic and systemic is the next step toward improving
instruction and student learning.


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Addenda

The External Review Team

Lead Evaluator:
Mrs. Donna Mathern

Associate Lead Evaluator:
Ms. Mary L Mickelson

Team Member:
Ms. Becky Balcer

Ms. Linda M Beaulieu-Imperial

Ms. Mari Brown

Mr. Brian E. Jordan

Jeneen Lemar

Marion Sutton

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2014 Advance Education, Inc. All rights reserved unless otherwise granted by written agreement.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Next Steps

The institution should:
Review and discuss the findings from this report with all stakeholders.
Ensure that plans are in place to embed and sustain the strengths noted in the Powerful Practices section
to maximize their impact on the institution.
Develop action plans to address the Required Actions made by the team. Include methods for monitoring
progress toward addressing the Required Actions.
Use the report to guide and strengthen the institution's efforts to improve student performance and system
effectiveness.
Following the External Review, submit the Accreditation Progress Report detailing progress made toward
addressing the Required Actions. Institutions are required to respond to all Required Actions. The Required
Actions should be completed before the Accreditation Progress Report is submitted. The report will be
reviewed at the appropriate state, national, and/or international levels to monitor and ensure that the
system has implemented the necessary actions to complete the Required Actions. The accreditation status
will be reviewed and acted upon based on the completion of the Required Actions and the resulting
improvement.
Continue to meet the AdvancED accreditation standards, submit required reports, engage in continuous
improvement, and document results.
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Celebrating Accreditation

Following the External Review, the team submits the final report to AdvancED for review and for action by the
AdvancED Accreditation Commission that confers accreditation upon the institution. Upon receiving its
accreditation, the institution should share its achievement with internal and external communities.

About AdvancED

In 2006, the North Central Association Commission on Accreditation and School Improvement (NCA CASI), the
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Council on Accreditation and School Improvement (SACS CASI),
both founded in 1895, and the National Study of School Evaluation (NSSE) came together to form AdvancED: one
strong, unified organization dedicated to education quality. In 2011, the Northwest Accreditation Commission
(NWAC) that was founded in 1917 joined NCA CASI and SACS CASI as part of AdvancED. AdvancED is the
world's largest education community, representing 30,000 public and private schools and systems across the
United States and in 75 countries worldwide and educating 16 million students.

Today, NCA CASI, NWAC, and SACS CASI serve as accreditation divisions of AdvancED. Through AdvancED,
these divisions share research-based accreditation standards that cross state, regional, national, and international
boundaries. Accompanying these standards is a unified accreditation process designed to help educational
institutions continuously improve.
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References

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