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Lesson Plan - Interactive Read Aloud

Rationale: The first grade curriculum states that children need to be introduced to making text to
self-connections and to making predictions as strategies to comprehend text. The children already
have been introduced and have practiced making text-self connections in prior interactive read
aloud lessons. They also know how to work with their elbow partners during an interactive read
aloud lesson. This lesson includes making text-self connections and adds making predictions.
Because of the nature of an interactive read aloud, the lesson also builds syntactic knowledge,
knowledge of text structure of narrative text, and word meaning knowledge, as well as knowledge
about what fluent reading sounds like. The children in this classroom are at a wide range of literacy
development. ssessments at the middle of the year indicate that most of the children are at the
Transitional !tage, while several are at the Beginning reader stage. !ome of the children are
moving into the dvance Beginning !tage. This lesson addresses the diverse literacy needs of all
of the children because " will be doing the reading, which will free up the children to focus on
doing the thinking. The children will all be able to do the thinking as the text deals with a topic
familiar to their lives. They will also be able to practice the strategies on books at their own
independent reading levels.
Goals (Standards):
The students will#
$$!! %&.'.(# )escribe characters, settings, and ma*or events in a story, using key details.
Objectives:
The students will#
Make connections between te te!t and teir own lives b" usin# teir $rior knowled#e (%-S)
(&ocus o& assess'ent)
Make $redictions to understand te stor" (&ocus o& assess'ent)
Assess'ent:
" will use a rubric to note student behavior during the turn and talk part of the lesson.
Strate#ies &or cildren re(uirin# additional assistance:
This is a multi-level learning experience+ so all children should be able to actively engage in the
learning. " will make sure to pair-up children with their elbow partners for the participation part
of the lesson. " will remodel how to make predictions, if necessary, as " observe and interact with
the children.
Materials )eeded:
Title# !tone !oup by ,on , -uth
.redictions %ubric
%otal %i'e )eeded: /0-/1 minutes
Procedures:
Introduction: (*e&ore readin#)
2ave been learning about how good readers use different strategies to help them
make sense of the text. 3ou have been learning about how good readers active
their prior knowledge when they are reading. 4ow let5s take a look at the cover of
!tone !oup and " would like you to active your prior knowledge. 6hat are you
thinking about when you look at the cover7 Turn and talk to your elbow partner
and discuss what the cover reminds you of.
3ou have already been learning about making predication and today " would you
to practice that tool while we read.
"ntro title and author8illustrator-!tone !oup is a traditional 9uropean folklore
:explain what folklore is-a story based down from generation to generation, adults
would tell the children the story and when the children grew up they would tell the
story to their children;. This version of !tone !oup takes place in $hina.
!et .urpose# %emember that making connections to our prior knowledge helps us
predict what might happen next in the book. &ets see what predictions we can
make while we read.
%ead the title again and provide a brief overview of the book# This story is about
three monks that come to a village where no one is happy. The three monks decide
to teach the villagers about happiness by making stone soup.
+e'onstration and Partici$ation:
-odel making a connection with what makes me happy. :That reminds me that "
am happiest when " am spending time with my friends and family;
sk# 6hat makes you happy7
Turn and talk to your elbow partner about what that is.
-ake comments about what they said.
Then say# " wonder what has happened in this village that has made everyone
unhappy7 <rom this picture " can see that everyone is hiding in the houses. " know
from my prior knowledge that when " get scared " sometimes hide. lso, " am not
happy when " am scared. -y predication is that they are unhappy because they are
afraid of each other.
Partici$ation (+urin# readin#)
Begin reading# =n page ' pause# Monks :vocabulary;-members of a religious
group
.age ( pause# Sus$icious :vocabulary;-they didn5t trust each other
!top page ># &et5s see if we can make a prediction here. 6hat do you think will
happen next7 Turn and talk to your buddy about your predictions. =bserve
students and record their thinking. :&ook for using text clues and previous
knowledge; $omment on students5 responses and ask how they made the
prediction. :previous knowledge, pictures; ex# 3ou predicted that?what clues did
you use from the text and your prior knowledge7
!top page '0# " wonder what will happen next7 Turn and talk to your buddy about
your predictions. =bserve students and record their thinking. :&ook for using text
clues and previous knowledge; $omment on students5 responses and ask how they
made the prediction. :previous knowledge, pictures; 3ou predicted that?what
clues did you use from the text and your prior knowledge7
!top page /0# " wonder what will happen next7 Turn and talk to your buddy about
your prediction. =bserve students and record their thinking. :&ook for using text
clues and previous knowledge; $omment on students5 responses and ask how they
made the prediction. :previous knowledge, pictures; 3ou predicted that?what
clues did you use from the text and your prior knowledge7
$heck predictions during the reading as they present themselves.
9ngage in brief discussion about the text :post reading;
$heck predictions about the reading
.ersonal reactions# what liked and why+ what liked best
"n $hina, yellow is usually only read by royalty :kings and @ueens;. "n
!tone !oup, the little girl wore yellow but she isn5t royalty. 6hy would the
illustrator have made her wear yellow7
6hat was the big idea of this story7 6hat did the villagers learn about
from the monks7
,losure:
$omment on predictions
Aood readers use their prior knowledge can clues from the text to make predictions
about what might happen next in a story to deepen their understanding of the text.
)ismiss children to 6riters5 6orkshop
Possible )e!t Ste$s: $ontinue modeling making predictions during %eaders5 6orkshop and have
students work independently during %eaders5 6orkshop on making predictions.
Practice: Today when you read your books, work on making predictions. Bse post-it notes to
write your predictions and place them in your book. %emember to activate your prior knowledge and use
clues from the text to help you make your predictions. %emember good readers use predictions to help them
better understand the story. Be prepared to share with the class. 3ou may now go to your desk and take out
your independent reading books and start working. :(0 minutes; )uring the practice time " will rotate
around the room and conference with students.
Per&or'ance: .ull children back together again in whole group. :Turn off work music, turn on
the lights, sing the share time song; sk children to share with their elbow partner thee predictions the
made and how they made those predications.
,losure: $omment on making predictions and how good readers activate their prior
knowledge and use clues from the text to make predictions about what might happen next in a
story. This helps the reader to deepen their understanding of the text.
!tudents will continue to practice making predictions
during %eaders5 6orkshop.