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Fiona Pidgeon 657999X


EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice
Folio resource template
Theme / title of item: Written Maths Early Written Numerals by Molly
Evidence:
This pictures is of markings made by Molly, aged 3 years and 11 months, and the markings represent the numbers six,
seven and eight.
Childrens Mathematics Network. (2012). Early written numerals [image]. Retrieved from http://www.childrens-
mathematics.net/gallery_01_number.htm


Explanation of the evidence:
1. How is this resource used in childrens early maths development?

This child is developing a sense of numeracy and beginning to explore mathematical principles and concepts
(MacMillan, 2009). The mathematical activity is playing, intrinsic motivation is curiosity and interpersonal motivation is
respect (MacMillan, 2009). Children use mark makings to explore symbols in a non-standard way and they read the
symbol as if it were correct (Curruthers and Worthington, 2003). This method is play-based learning where children
use marks to symbolically represent numbers (Department for Children, Schools and Families, 2008).
2. What are the benefits and limitations of the resource?

The benefits of this resource is that can improve childrens ability to undertake calculations. This resource can also
provide support and understanding when children start to problem solve, reason and undertake numeracy. By using
childrens mathematical graphics, they also become more confident as writers and mathematical thinkers (Department
for Children, Schools and Families, 2008).
Outcome 4: Children are Confident and Involved Learners. These learning outcomes cover curiosity, cooperation,
confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity. Other areas include problem
solving, inquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating. All these outcomes can assist children
organising, recording and communicating mathematical ideas, concepts using mathematical language and symbols
(DEEWR, 2009, pp 34-35)

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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Reflection linked to knowledge, practice and engagement:
Early learning practitioners should be modelling mathematical language and use open questions and discussions to
encourage childrens mathematical graphics. They need to monitor and evaluate the resources available to the
children so that they are encouraged to use problem solving, reasoning and numeracy skills. Role play and the use of
mathematical signage can assist the children with developing their mathematical graphics and fosters a culture of
mathematical numeracy and learning. Children should not be discouraged when mark making as this supports their
mathematical thinking and processes (The Williams Maths Review, DCSF, 2008a as cited in Childrens Mathematics
Network, 2012).



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Fiona Pidgeon 657999X
EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio

Theme / title of item: Extending written mathematics - Outside Play Cafe
Evidence:
The resource is a caf in an outside play house where children can practice their mathematical graphics by writing
down menu orders.
The idea for this resource is sourced from Carruthers, E., & Worthington, M. (2011), Understanding Childrens
Mathematical Graphics : Beginnings in Play retrieved from
http://web.a.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.lib.swin.edu.au/ehost/ebookviewer/ebook/bmxlYmtfXzM3NTExNF9fQU41?sid=7b
29d518-1eab-4c72-a455-49e887099211@sessionmgr4005&vid=0&format=EB&rid=1


Explanation of the evidence:
3. How is this resource used in childrens early maths development?

This resource assists children with the development of their written mathematics through exploration with marks which
correlates to mathematical meanings (Carruthers and Worthington, 2011). The mathematical activity is playing, the
intrinsic motivation is curiosity and the interpersonal motivation is respect (MacMillan, 2009). MacMillan (2009)
suggests that children, when offered opportunities of formalised play, extend their mathematical knowledge by
unconsciously applying the concepts of mathematics. In this activity, children use their current knowledge of ordering
at a caf by taking and writing down the order.

4. What are the benefits and limitations of the resource?
Extending their mathematical abilities through this resource will assist children in developing problem solving,
reasoning and numeracy skills as well as their confidence in themselves as writers and mathematical thinkers
(Worthington and Carruthers, 2012). Play based learning provides a means for exploring and communicating ideas,
feelings and thoughts (Worthington and Carruthers, 2012). If children are free to choose how they make their graphical
markings, they are then able to translate between the informal marks and the standard symbols used later in their
education (Worthington and Carruthers, 2012).


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Fiona Pidgeon 657999X
EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Outcome 4: Children are Confident and Involved Learners. These learning outcomes cover curiosity, cooperation,
confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity. Other areas include problem
solving, inquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating. All these outcomes can assist children
organising, recording and communicating mathematical ideas, concepts using mathematical language and symbols
(DEEWR, 2009, pp 34-35)
Reflection linked to knowledge, practice and engagement:
Responsive teaching practices will assist the child in developing further mathematical skills when using this resource
(MacMillan, 2009). This resource is a concrete resource that can provide verbal interactions and demonstrations so
that children can make sense of the mathematical concepts (MacMillan, 2009). When interacting with the children, the
teacher can model curiosity and use critical reflection techniques for example how many drinks did I order?



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Fiona Pidgeon 657999X
EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Theme / title of item: Making Connections Two of everything
Evidence:
This resource assists children in developing counting skills through stories. The book Two of Everything is used to
encourage discussions about pairs of objects and doubling, counting and development of number language.
Asia Education Foundation. (n.d.). Activity Four: Count Along. Retrieved from
http://www.asiaeducation.edu.au/curriculum_resources/maths/foundation_year_numbers_and_counting/activity_4_cou
nt_along.html

Explanation of the evidence:
5. How is this resource used in childrens early maths development?

Children develop their language and mathematical skills associated with comparing and ordering collections, sorting,
identifying and classifying of objects. They will extend their language development by describing and explaining as
they place items in and out of the magic pot (Asia Education Foundation, n.d.). The mathematical activity is counting,
the intrinsic motivation is choice and the interpersonal motivation is respect (MacMillan, 2009).
6. What are the benefits and limitations of the resource?

There are strong links with constructivist views of learning as the children work collaboratively and are learning as
individuals as they complete the task (Hayes, 2010 as cited in Kelly, n.d.). The children are engaged in the story and
complete a mathematical challenge and this is more engaging for children as they are not seen to be undertaking just
one topic (Kelly, n.d.).
One of the limitations include that dominant children may play a more active role in the activity and lose their identity
(Kelly, n.d.).
ACARA links
Foundation Year: Number and Algebra. Number and place value. Connect number names, numerals and quantities,
including zero, initially up to 10 and then beyond (ACARA, n.d.).
Foundation Year Literature and context. Recognise that texts are created by authors who tell stories and share
experiences that may be similar or different to students own experiences (ACARA, n.d.).
Year 1 Number and place value. Develop confidence with number sequences to and from 100 by ones from any

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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
starting point. Skip count by twos, fives and tens starting from zero (ACARA, n.d.)

Reflection linked to knowledge, practice and engagement:
A variety of materials are used for the children to use for counting, sorting, ordering and comparing such as beads,
blocks, marbles, paper clips and pegs (Asia Education Foundation, n.d.). It is an enabling environment which can be
adult and child led and can incorporate a range of learning styles. ACARA (n.d.) state that students need to recognise
that mathematics can be applied to other areas and apply the skills in a range of familiar and unfamiliar situations.



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Fiona Pidgeon 657999X
EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Theme / title of item: Making Connections - Money and financial mathematics Pancakes can make a difference
Evidence:

Pancakes can make a difference covers three strands: Mathematics, Science and English and is about making
pancakes as a fundraiser for a chosen charity. Students read a book about fundraising and then create their own
project and understand how fundraising can make a difference in society.
.
Education Services Australia. (2014). Scootle. Mathematics / Year 1 / Number and Algebra / Money and financial
mathematics. Retrieved from http://www.scootle.edu.au/ec/search?accContentId=ACMNA017
Explanation of the evidence:
7. How is this resource used in childrens early maths development?

This resource provides understandings, skills and values and connects to the real world (ASIC, n.d.). It covers a
fundraising event and students create advertising, count and sort money and determine the costing of products. It links
to the Australian Curriculum and students develop the following capabilities and skills: Numeracy, literacy, creative and
critical thinking, and personal and social capability (ASIC, n.d.). There are also sequenced teaching and learning
activities, assessment tasks (formative and summative) and resources.


8. What are the benefits and limitations of the resource?

This resource is already linked with the curriculum and provides all the worksheets, tools and resources for the
educator. The tools can be modified to suit the students, ensuring that all learners needs are catered for and is learner
centred, making it an ideal 21
st
century resource. The limitations could be that if you do not have an onsite oven or you
dont have permission to undertake fundraising from the school authority.
ACARA
Mathematics / Year 1 / Number and Algebra / Money and financial mathematics / Recognise, describe and order
Australian coins according to their value (ACARA, n.d.).

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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Reflection linked to knowledge, practice and engagement:
Everyday mathematics has been identified and is used to deliver this program, enabling students to use concrete tools
and ideas that will broaden their mathematical understanding. Children use math talk and time is allowed for
individuals and groups to foster communication about their learnings. The teacher can also scaffold opportunities to
deepen the childrens understanding and confidence of mathematics (Ontario, n.d.).




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Fiona Pidgeon 657999X
EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Theme / title of item: Approaches to planning EYLF Term 3 Plan, Earth and Beyond.
Evidence:
The plan is very science based but one plan is that of weaving the concepts of distance and time into the numeracy
learning through exploring the questions How long does it take to get to space? And How far away is space? Talking
about time in terms of day, week, year etc. (Gowrie SA, n.d. p.16).

Gowrie SA. (n.d.). Early Childhood Program Examples Ideas and Inspiration. Retrieved from
http://www.pscsa.org.au/cms/files/Gowrie%20SA%20Early%20Childhood%20Program%20Examples.pdf

Explanation of the evidence:
9. How is this resource used in childrens early maths development?

Children match and describe characteristics, attributes of patterns, objects and collection during an excursion. Children
describe early mathematical ideas using the objects, pictures and drawings made that relate to the exercise and can
include created symbols and number. They use videos to explore quantities, position, movement, direction, order,
sequence and pattern.

10. What are the benefits and limitations of the resource?

It is very cross-curricula and explores the content using constructivist theories. Knowledge is being actively
constructed through building rockets, counting, exploring and is supported by an age appropriate, integrated curriculum
using a project approach (MacMillan, 2009). There is social interaction between the teachers, children and the parents
(MacMillan, 2009).
The limitations are that it is very broad and incorporating mathematics into the daily activities could be lost. Its
essential that proper planning is undertaken to ensure that all mathematical knowledge and skills are taught.




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Fiona Pidgeon 657999X
EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Early Years Learning Framework
Outcome 4: Children are Confident and Involved Learners. These learning outcomes cover curiosity, cooperation,
confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity. Other areas include problem
solving, inquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating. All these outcomes can assist children
organising, recording and communicating mathematical ideas, concepts using mathematical language and symbols
(DEEWR, 2009, pp 34-35)
Reflection linked to knowledge, practice and engagement:
When delivering this program, I will need to be very familiar with its content as well as organized as there is quite a bit
that needs to be covered during the term. It will also be essential to consult with other practitioners in the early learning
centre to ensure each of the activities will be documented and include this in any planning documentation.




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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Theme / title of item: Approaches to planning - Australian Curriculum Learning about shapes
Evidence:
Learning about Shapes is a 2 week unit of lesson plans (ten lessons in total) on two-dimensional (2D) and three-
dimensional (3D) shapes for Foundation, Year 1 and Year 2 students. The lesson looks at every day and mathematical
language and explores sides, corners, edges and faces and students classify the shapes using obvious features.

Australian Curriculum Lessons. (2014). Learning About Shapes: A 2 week unit of lesson plans on 2D and 3D shapes
for F/1/2. Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculumlessons.com.au/2013/11/23/learning-about-shapes-a-
2-week-unit-on-2d-and-3d-shapes-for-f12/


Australian Curriculum Lessons [image].
Explanation of the evidence:
11. How is this resource used in childrens early maths development?

It is content driven and meets the prescribed standards and learning outcomes of the Australian Curriculum (Pugh &
Duffy, 2013). Using MacLeod-Brudenells (2004, p. 251) planning considerations, childrens existing skills have not
been assessed; opportunities for collaboration; theres no plan for extending learning; plan for the role of the
practitioner is included and various learning and teaching strategies used. The following MacMillans (2009)
mathematical skills have been applied: Problem-solving; Reasoning; Communication; Disposition; Making Connections
and Evaluating.
12. What are the benefits and limitations of the resource?

The benefits of this plan is that the lesson is ready to go, with all resources created, roles easily defined and
assessment tools created. The planner has also thought about scaffolding the learning by adding various questions
that can be used throughout the lessons.
The limitations of this lesson is that there are no time allocations for the exercises and this will need to be defined in
order to allocate planning for the days and weeks ahead.


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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Australian Curriculum Links
Foundation Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the
environment (ACARA, n.d.)
Year 1 Recognise and classify familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects using obvious
features (ACARA, n.d.)
Year 2 Describe and draw two-dimensional shapes, with and without digital technologies (ACARA, n.d.)
Year 2 Describe the features of three-dimensional objects (ACARA, n.d.)

Reflection linked to knowledge, practice and engagement:
I would ensure time frames are created and assess the children in the class to see if each child is able to meet the
outcomes. Some children may need extra time to consider the activities and some children will need extensions in
order to keep them engaged (pedagogical framing Siraj-Glatchford et al, 2002, p.7



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Fiona Pidgeon 657999X
EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Theme / title of item: Designing meaningful, purposeful activities Music Mats

Evidence:
This resource is designed for children in an early years environment (preferably Birth Five) and incorporates music as
a tool for counting and incorporating information and communication technology. The resource is sourced from E2BN
(2008) and is an activity plan.
E2BN. (2008). ICT in early years- Activity Plans. Retrieved from http://ictearlyyears.e2bn.org/resources_102.html

Explanation of the evidence:
13. How is this resource used in childrens early maths development?

The concrete material (music mat) is the feature of the learning exercise and children are monitored and evaluated
through observation and interaction. These are good examples of constructivist theory in the planning of this exercise
(MacMillan, 2009). It is imaginative and purposeful, engaging multiple intelligences by using meaningful tasks that
engage the individuals strengths and interests (MacMillan, 2009). They will be learning 1-1 correspondence and count
up to five and Bishops categories used are counting, locating and playing (MacMillan, 2009).

14. What are the benefits and limitations of the resource?

Childrens involvement is recognised and valued in a flexible and open-ended environment. Teachers have the
opportunity to provide children encouragement as well as working collaboratively (holding hands whilst gaining
confidence on the mat) or individually (doing the exercise themselves). Children can use their imagination and try new
challenges when using the mat (DEEWR, 2009). The limitations is that not all children can walk across the mat (as
they may be too young).





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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Early Years Learning Framework
Outcome 4: Children are Confident and Involved Learners. These learning outcomes cover curiosity, cooperation,
confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity. Other areas include problem
solving, inquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating. All these outcomes can assist children
organising, recording and communicating mathematical ideas, concepts using mathematical language and symbols
(DEEWR, 2009, pp 34-35)
Reflection linked to knowledge, practice and engagement:
Responsive teaching can be used to encourage the children to help them develop further mathematical skills and
expand, extend and clarify what they currently already know (MacMillan, 2009). To extend, start with a simple counting
game before using the mat and then move to the mat (or vice versa). Its important to ensure that the children are
owning the game, rather than the teacher leading the game as this supports the children interpersonally (MacMillan,
2009).



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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Theme / title of item: Designing meaningful, purposeful activities Counting Beetles making word problems
Evidence:

Aimed at years one and two, this is an information and communication technology tool to assist children to create their
own addition and subtraction word problems, using a number line to model addition and subtraction facts and
construct and solve addition and subtraction number sentences.
Education Services Australia (ESA). (2014). Counting Beetles, Making Word Problems. Retrieved from
http://bit.ly/1onYIJ6

Explanation of the evidence:
15. How is this resource used in childrens early maths development?

Children explore strategies for solving addition and subtraction problems through the use of an information and
communications technology tool online. Problems are explored through number line modelling and connect word
problems and equations. It is prescriptive and does not allow for any flexibility (MacMillan, 2009). Technology
increases childrens confidence and develops positive attitudes towards mathematics. Children can collaborate, work
alone or the teacher can use smartboard technology with a group of children (J. Siraj-Blatchford, 2008, pp. 337-338).

16. What are the benefits and limitations of the resource?

Children can work alone confidently on the sums and the tasks are quite repetitive allowing the child to try again if they
have not solved the problem correctly. The children learn such skills as critical and creative thinking, mathematical
expressions and skip counting (ACARA, n.d.).
This resource only allows the children to solve the problem in one way meaning that the children solve it the way it is
presented rather than starting with the higher number and then adding the lower number.
Australian Curriculum
Mathematics / 1 / Number and Algebra / Number and place value (ACARA, n.d.)
Mathematics / 2 / Number and Algebra / Patterns and algebra (ACARA, n.d.)
Mathematics / 1 / Statistics and Probability / Data representation and interpretation (ACARA, n.d.)


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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Reflection linked to knowledge, practice and engagement:
For this activity, I would incorporate some activity based problems so that the children can use some concrete
materials as well as the technology component. Children can interact, self-regulate and think independently
(MacMillan, 2009). Its important to monitor, observe and analyse the childrens activities and include some enactive
based activities to start the lessons off (MacMillan, 2009).



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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Theme / title of item: Assessing, anticipating, extending childrens learning Child oriented assessment

Evidence:

This resource is based on the United Kingdom curriculum but can be adapted to meet the Australian Curriculum. Both
the teacher and the student undertake an assessment against the content descriptions.
TesConnect. (2014). Maths APP Child Friendly Assessment Grids. Retrieved from
http://www.tes.co.uk/ResourceDetail.aspx?storyCode=6080768&


Explanation of the evidence:
17. How is this resource used in childrens early maths development?

Children who assess their own goals are perceived as competent and confident learners and communicators (Te
Whriki, page 9 as cited on Ministry of Education New Zealand, 2014). They are expressing opinions and views of
their own, therefore promoting independence as well as an orientation towards setting further goals of their own (Te
Whriki, page 9 as cited on Ministry of Education New Zealand, 2014). This is a summative assessment tool that is
based on a checklist and is evidenced by a variety of sources. Also good for comparative data across a set group of
students (MacMillan, 2009).

18. What are the benefits and limitations of the resource?

Assessment is not just based on one activity undertaken by the child but over a period of time, giving a holistic view of
the childs abilities (ACARA, n.d.). Children are also privy to setting their own goals of what they want to achieve for
the upcoming period.
Children may not accurately record their opinions or alternatively, may be frightened to provide an accurate report of
their own learning.

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Fiona Pidgeon 657999X
EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Reflection linked to knowledge, practice and engagement:
This resource will be helpful in gaining an idea into what the childrens perception is of their own learning and
assumptions. Children will be applying their own self-assessment and recognition of achievement which provides a
collaborative environment to work within. This encourages children and teachers to work together rather than against
each other.





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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio

Theme / title of item: Assessing, anticipating, extending childrens learning New South Wales Syllabuses for the
Australian curriculum
Evidence:
Sample assessment for Early Stage 1, linked to the Sorting and Arranging Objects and Pictures into Data Displays
sample unit. Assessment includes criteria for assessment, feedback, outcomes, description of activity and context.


Board of Studies New South Wales. (n.d.). Sample Assessment for Learning Activities. Retrieved from
http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/support-materials/sample-afl-activities/

Explanation of the evidence:
19. How is this resource used in childrens early maths development?

Resource is valid and based on Australian Curriculum and includes criteria against which students will be
assessed. Students can be assessed in a range of contexts and is free from bias and provides accurate evidence
of the students knowledge, understanding and skills. Students and teachers are able to provide feedback during
the assessment period and reflect on the learning process. This assessment is also inclusive of and accessible to
all students and can be monitored over a period of time (Board of Studies New South Wales, n.d.).

20. What are the benefits and limitations of the resource?

The resource can be undertaken at any significant point in time and assists with providing an overall assessment or
grade of the student. Feedback between the teacher and student provides the opportunity to plan future learning goals
and pathways for students. It also forms part of a transparent process to all audiences (Board of Studies New South
Wales, n.d.).
Assessment of learning when used for the purpose of grading or ranking is dependent on validity and reliability of the
activities provided (Board of Studies New South Wales, n.d.).


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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Reflection linked to knowledge, practice and engagement:
The resource is well balanced as it caters for outcomes, evidence, teaching and learning, context and the learning
needs of the students. This assessment tool could assist the teacher to plan for future student learning needs and look
at extending their knowledge, understanding and skills.




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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
References
Asia Education Foundation. (n.d.). Activity Four: Count Along. Retrieved from
http://www.asiaeducation.edu.au/curriculum_resources/maths/foundation_year_numb
ers_and_counting/activity_4_count_along.html
Australian Curriculum and Assessment Reporting Authority. (2014). Foundation to Year 10
Curriculum: English. Retrieved from
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/english/Curriculum/F-10?layout=1
Australian Curriculum and Assessment Reporting Authority. (2014). Foundation to Year 10
Curriculum: General Capabilities: Numeracy: Numeracy Across the Curriculum.
Retrieved from
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/GeneralCapabilities/numeracy/introduction/n
umeracy-across-the-curriculum
Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA). (n.d.). F-10
Curriculum / Mathematics / Curriculum. Retrieved from
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/mathematics/Curriculum/F-10?layout=1
Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (n.d.). F-10 Curriculum /
Mathematics / Implications for Teaching, Assessment and Reporting. Retrieved from
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/mathematics/implications-for-teaching-
assessment-and-reporting
Australian Curriculum Lessons. (2014). Learning About Shapes: A 2 week unit of lesson
plans on 2D and 3D shapes for F/1/2. Retrieved from
http://www.australiancurriculumlessons.com.au/2013/11/23/learning-about-shapes-a-
2-week-unit-on-2d-and-3d-shapes-for-f12/

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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Australian Securities and Investment Commission [ASIC]. (n.d.). MoneySmart Teaching.
Pancakes Can Make a Difference. Retrieved from
https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/media/499314/mst_primary_integratedf2_unit.pdf
Board of Studies New South Wales. (n.d.). Principles of Affective Assessment. Retrieved
from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/support-materials/principles-of-effective-
assessment/
Board of Studies New South Wales. (n.d.). Sample Assessment for Learning Activities.
Retrieved from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/support-materials/sample-afl-activities/
Carruthers, E., & Worthington, M. (2003). Research Uncovers Children's Creative
Mathematical Thinking. Retrieved from http://www.childrens-
mathematics.net/articles_research_uncovers.htm.
Carruthers, E., & Worthington, M. (2011). Understanding Children's Mathematical
Graphics : Beginnings in Play. Maidenhead: Open University Press
Childrens Mathematical Network. (2012). The Williams Maths Review. Retrieved from
http://www.childrens-mathematics.net/news_williams_maths_review.htm
Department for Children, Schools and Families. (2008). Making Marks Matter. Retrieved
from
webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130401151715/http://www.education.gov.uk/p
ublications/eOrderingDownload/Mark_Making_Matters.pdf
Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. (2009). Early Years
Learning Framework, pp 34-35. Retrieved from
https://www.coag.gov.au/sites/default/files/early_years_learning_framework.pdf

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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
E2BN. (2008). ICT in early years- Activity Plans. Retrieved from
http://ictearlyyears.e2bn.org/resources_102.html
Education Services Australia (ESA). (2014). Counting Beetles, Making Word Problems.
Retrieved from
https://www.scootle.edu.au/ec/viewMetadata.action?id=L8284&q=&topic=&start=0
&sort=alignment&contentsource=&contentprovider=&resourcetype=&v=text&show
LomCommercialResources=false&field=title&field=text.all&field=topic&learningare
a=%22Mathematics%22&contenttype=all&contenttype=%22Interactive%20resource
%22&contenttype=%22Collection%22&contenttype=%22Image%22&contenttype=
%22Moving%20image%22&contenttype=%22Sound%22&contenttype=%22Assess
ment%20resource%22&contenttype=%22Teacher%20guide%22&contenttype=%22D
ataset%22&contenttype=%22Text%22&contenttype=%22StillImage%22&contenttyp
e=%22MovingImage%22&commResContentType=all&commResContentType=%22
App%20%28mobile%29%22&commResContentType=%22Audio%22&commResCo
ntentType=%22Book%20%28electronic%29%22&commResContentType=%22Book
%20%28printed%29%22&commResContentType=%22Digital%20item%22&comm
ResContentType=%22Learning%20object%22&commResContentType=%22Other%
22&commResContentType=%22Printed%20item%22&commResContentType=%22
Software%22&commResContentType=%22Teacher%20resource%22&commResCon
tentType=%22Video%22&userlevel=%281%29&kc=any&lom=true&scot=true&foll
ow=true&topiccounts=true&rows=20&suggestedResources=M015977,M011436,M0
12290&accContentId=ACMNA016&fromSearch=true

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EDU20002 Mathematics in Practice Assessment 3: Folio
Education Services Australia. (2014). Scootle. Mathematics / Year 1 / Number and Algebra
/ Money and financial mathematics. Retrieved from
http://www.scootle.edu.au/ec/search?accContentId=ACMNA017
Gowrie SA. (n.d.). Early Childhood Program Examples Ideas and Inspiration. Retrieved
from
http://www.pscsa.org.au/cms/files/Gowrie%20SA%20Early%20Childhood%20Progra
m%20Examples.pdf
Hong, L. (1993). Two of Everything. Albert Whitman & Company, Morton Grove, Illinois.
Kelly, L. (n.d.). Why use a Cross-Curricular Approach to Teaching and Learning?
Retrieved from https://www.mheducation.co.uk/openup/chapters/9780335247042.pdf
MacLeod-Brudenell, I. (2004). Advanced Early Years Care and Education. Oxford:
Heinemann.
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