Anda di halaman 1dari 13

Parent Presentation

Rebecca LaRochelle
ECE 497
Instructor Reed
November 10, 2014

Adolescent Development
Adolescence refers to the age of children between 11 years of
age to 18 years of age (Berk, 2013).
This period illustrates the transition to adulthood (Berk,
2013).

Puberty leads to an adult-sized body and sexual maturity


(Berk, 2013).
Thought becomes abstract and idealistic, and schooling is
increasingly direct toward preparation for higher education and
the world of work (Berk, 2013).
Young people begin to establish autonomy from the family and
to define personal values and goals (Berk, 2013).

My Role as a Child Development


Professional
My role as a child development professional is an educator.
As an educator, I understand the importance of parent/teacher communication and have to be
knowledgeable on the various ways to create and sustain a partnership with families. Not only
do I understand the importance of this communication, I am also knowledgeable on the
influence that this partnership, or lack their of, can and will have on the learning and
development of children. There is a much greater likelihood of academic success if there is a
positive relationship between the teacher and the parents. So, as an educator, this is a crucial
aspect of educating children, developing regular communication between the parents of
children under my care and myself.

Supported Rationale
At any school and in any community, it is important for parents and community members to
learn of and understand the importance of a positive and on-going, active relationship between
parents, families, schools, and communities.
For the sake of the communities children, it is essential that teachers and schools develop a
positive relationship with families and community members. This positive relationship will
have a positive impact of the learning and development of children within the community.
If the parents of children within the community, schools, and community members work
together and assert influence on one another in a positive way, this will positively influence a
childs development. However, if these elements of a childs life work against one another, this
could negatively influence a childs development (Education Portal, n.d.).
I also want to add that a childs academic progress depends not only on activities that take
place in the classroom but also on parent involvement in school life and on the extent to which
academic learning is carried over into the home (Berk, 2013).

Bronfenbrenners Ecological
Systems Theory
According to Urie Bronfenbrenners Ecological Systems Theory,
there are a series of five structures that form a complex
functioning whole, or a system (Berk, 2013). The system I am
going to focus on here is the mesosystem.
The mesosystem is the second level of this functioning system.
This encompasses connections between microsystems, such as
home, school, neighborhood, and childcare center (Berk, 2013).
The mesosystem consists of the relationship between each of the
parts of a childs microsystem. As stated previously, if the parts
of a childs microsystem work together and assert influence on
one another in a positive way, this will positively influence a
childs development. However, if the elements of a childs
microsystem work against one another, this could negatively
influence a childs development (Education Portal, n.d.).

Epsteins Types of Involvement


As mentioned previously, the relationship between a childs
school and home is important for the well-being and development
of children. With that being said, learning of ways to get parents
involved in their childs school and education is important for the
successful learning and development of their child(ren).
Joyce L. Epstein has developed six different types of involvement
that can help parents to become more involved in their childs
schooling, and their childs learning and development.

By implementing activities for all six types of involvement,


schools can help parents become involved at school and at home
in various ways that meet student needs and family schedules
(Epstein & Salinas, 2004).

Parenting
This type of parent involvement consists of helping all families establish home
environments to support children as students (Epstein, n.d.).
This type of parent involvement influences a childs development by children developing:
an awareness of family supervision and develop respect for parents; positive personal
qualities, habits, beliefs, and values, as taught by family; balance between time spent on
chores, on other activities, and on homework; good or improved attendance; and an
awareness of importance of school (Epstein, n.d.).
One idea that we or the community could implement now that would align with the cultures
we have here at our school is to implement neighborhood meetings to help families
understand our school and to help our school understand families.

Communicating
This type of parent involvement consists of designing effective forms of
school-to-home and home-to-school communications about school programs
and children's progress (Epstein, n.d.).
This type of parenting involvement influences a childs development by
children developing: an awareness of own progress and of actions needed to
maintain or improve grades; understanding of school policies on behavior,
attendance, and other areas of student conduct; informed decisions about
courses and programs; and an awareness of own role in partnerships, serving
as courier and communicator (Epstein, n.d.).
One idea the we can implement right away that will align with the cultures
present at our school is to develop regular communication with families
through any means necessary and preferred by the families. If this involves
parent-teacher meetings, phone calls regularly, text messages regularly,
weekly fliers sent home, etc. Any means of communication that families
would prefer is how we will reach them individually.

Volunteering
This type of parent involvement consists of recruiting and
organizing parent help and support (Epstein, n.d.).
This type of parent involvement influences students by: developing
skill in communicating with adults; increased learning of skills that
receive tutoring or targeted attention from volunteers; awareness of
many skills, talents, occupations, and contributions of parent and
other volunteers (Epstein, n.d.).
One idea that we can implement right away that will align with the
cultures present at our school is to develop a parent room or family
center for volunteer work, meetings, and resources available for
families (Epstein, n.d.).

Learning At Home
This type of parent involvement consists of providing information and ideas to families
about how to help students at home with homework and other curriculum-related activities,
decisions, and planning (Epstein, n.d.).
This type of parent involvement influences childrens development by students will: gains
in skills, abilities, and test scores linked to homework and classwork; homework
completion; positive attitude toward schoolwork; view of parents as more similar to teacher
and of home as more similar to school; and self-concept of ability as learner (Epstein, n.d.).
One idea that we can implement right away that will align with the cultures present at our
school is providing parents with information for families on skills required for students in
all subjects at each grade and information on homework policies and how to monitor and
discuss schoolwork at home (Epstein, n.d.).

Decision Making
This type of parent involvement consists of including parents in school
decisions and developing parent leaders and representatives (Epstein,
n.d.).
This type of parent involvement influences childrens development by
developing: an awareness of representation of families in school
decisions; understanding that student rights are protected; specific
benefits linked to policies enacted by parent organizations and
experienced by students (Epstein, n.d.).

One idea that we can implement right away that will align with the
cultures present at our school is by having an active parent-teacher
organization (PTO) or other parent organizations, advisory councils, or
committees for parent leadership and participation (Epstein, n.d.).

Collaborating with Community


This type of parent involvement consists of identifying and integrating resources and
services from the community to strengthen school programs, family practices, and student
learning and development (Epstein, n.d.).
This type of parent involvement influences childrens development by students will develop:
increased skills and talents through enriched curricular and extracurricular experiences; an
awareness of careers and of options for future education and work; and specific benefits
linked to programs, services, resources, and opportunities that connect students with
community (Epstein, n.d.).

One idea that we can implement right away that will align with the cultures present at our
school is by providing service to the community by students, families, and schools, such as
recycling, art, music, drama, and other activities for seniors or others (Epstein, n.d.).

References:
Berk, L. E., (2013). Child development. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.
Education Portal, (n.d.). Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory of Development:
Definition & Examples. Retrieved from: http://educationportal.com/academy/lesson/bronfenbrenners-ecological-systems-theory-of-developmentdefinition-examples.html
Epstein, J. L. & Salinas, K. C., (2004). Partnering with families and communities. Educational
Leadership. Retrieved from:
http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/journals/ed_lead/el200405_epstein.pdf

Epstein, J. L., (n.d.). Epsteins framework for six types of parent involvement. Retrieved from:
http://www.unicef.org/lac/Joyce_L._Epstein_s_Framework_of_Six_Types_of_Involvement(2).
pdf