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Lesson Plan Guide

Teacher Candidate:

Alina Manjiyani

Date:

9/2/2014

Grade and Topic:

3rd Science

Length of Lesson:

Mentor Teacher:

Carmen Weaver

School:

90 mins for 2 days

University of Memphis-IDT 3600

UNIT/CHAPTER OBJECTIVE/GENERALIZATION/BIG IDEA:


The composition and structure of matter is known, and it behaves according to principles that are
generally understood.
LESSON OBJECTIVE:
1) Given illustrations of the states of matter, students will be able to describe, observe, model, and draw the
different states of matter: solid, liquid, and gas with 100% accuracy.
STANDARDS ADDRESSED:
Design a simple experiment to determine how the physical properties of matter can change over time
and under different conditions.

Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources
and media.

MATERIALS:

Computer
Microsoft Word
Internet Access to:
a. States of Matter: Facts (http://idahoptv.org/sciencetrek/topics/matter/facts.cfm)
b. All About States of Matter (http://easyscienceforkids.com/all-about-states-of-matter/)
c. Google images for pictures OR Microsoft Clipart Gallery
Technology Integration
Students will use the websites stated above as resources for the States of Matter and access to images. Word processing
software will be used to type, format, and add images to the Picture the States of Matter activity. Upon completing the
activity, students will save their work to shared Drop box folder for their class. A sample of the activity is available
below.

BACKGROUND and RATIONALE:


a) Students will demonstrate a clear understanding of the States of Matter by providing visual
representations and written reflections on the descriptions of the States of Matter.
b) Academic Language is not addressed in IDT 3600
c) This is the first unit in Standard 9.
d) We will take the material and information learned from this lesson and incorporate it into future lessons
by investigating the different States of Matter and describing different methods to separate them.
e) I am aware that the lesson will be differentiated for students who did not master the objectives and for
those ready for enrichment. However, modifications are not covered in this course and are not part of
this particular lesson.

PROCEDURES AND TIMELINE:


Introduction
Begin by showing the class a Brain Pop video of the states of Matter on a large screen display, overhead,
or whiteboard.
Provide some brief background information about the States of Matter and ask questions to the students
about the video.
Display illustrations of the three States of Matter on the overhead and give students a few minutes to
silently observe them.
Go over the States of Matter as a class and discuss the descriptions of each State.
Have the students get up and on the count of three, show me what a solid, liquid and gas looks like. (For
example, if I say solid, students should come together and pretend that they are molecules and are tightly
packed together. If I say liquid, students should be aware that liquids move freely and therefore should
safely run around the classroom.) While the activity is going on, pick a student to explain to the class why
everyone is demonstrating that action. They should be able to tell me and the class what a solid, liquid, and
a gas is and a brief description to go along with it.

Procedures
Prior to the computer (15 minutes)
Teacher Procedures:
1) After the introduction, pull up the website which talks about the States of Matter and discuss it
amongst the class.
Student Procedures:
1) Students should be able to picture an image of all three states of matter in their heads and be
able to describe each state so they can use it to search for the images.
At the computer (45 minutes)
Teacher Procedures:
1) Have students open both MS Word and an Internet browser
2) Direct students to the States of Matter website
3) Direct students to the MS Clipart Gallery
4) Assist students in making a table on MS Word
5) Monitor and assist as needed
Student Procedures:
1) Open MS Word and an Internet browser
2) Go the States of Matter website provided and either have the students read it themselves, or read
it together as a class
3) Go to MS Word and add the following title: States of Matter
4) Below the title, insert a four-column 4-row table
5) Add the following column names: States of Matter; Brief Description; Illustration; Why Picture
was Chosen
6) Add the following row names: Solid; Liquid; Gas
7) Write a brief description of each matter in your own words
8) Use key words to locate an image for the States of Matter (use Goggle images or Clipart)
9) Use pull-down menu to copy the image
10) Go to Illustration cell in the Word document
11) Paste the Picture
12) Write a brief rationale for why the picture represents the description/State of Matter
13) Save Work
14) Repeat items 7-13 for the remaining States
15) When the work is completed, correct any spelling errors
16) Print a copy
After the computer (30 minutes)
Teacher Procedures:
1) Go over the States of Matter as a class

2) Explain the activity to the class


Student Procedures:
1) Students should know what solids, liquids, and gases are.
2) Students demonstrate what they know by forming into molecules and representing each State
according to what I want them to do.
3) Have fun!
4) After the activity, students will individually write a reflection about the States of Matter and
what it means to them. They will also draw what they think a solid, liquid and a gas looks like.
Closure:
Students volunteer to share their reflections on what they learned in class. At the end of class, the teacher collects
reflections, checks the assignment submissions, and polls the class for questions.

ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE:
States of Matter Rubric

Criteria

Graphic images
represent each
States of Matter

Very few or none of


the chosen
graphics represent
the concepts of
the States of Matter.

Only a few of the


chosen graphics
clearly or
somewhat clearly
represent the
concepts of
the States of Matter.

Almost all of the


chosen graphics
clearly represent
the concepts of
the States of Matter.

All of the chosen


graphics very
clearly represent
concepts of
the States of Matter.

Rationale for
using the
graphics

The rationale for


very few or none of
the chosen
graphics
demonstrates an
appropriate
representation of
the concept.

The rationale for


some of the
chosen graphics
demonstrates a
fairly appropriate
representation of
the concept.

The rationale for


almost all of the
chosen graphics
clearly
demonstrates why
the image is an
appropriate
representation.

The rationale for all


of the chosen
graphics very
clearly
demonstrates why
the images were an
appropriate
representation of
the concepts.

Reflections

The reflection does


not demonstrate an
understanding of
the States of Matter
and/or what it
means to the
student.

The reflection
demonstrates a
somewhat vague
understanding of
the States of Matter and
what it means to
the student.

The reflection
demonstrates a
somewhat clear
understanding of
the States of Matter and
what it means to
the student.

The reflection
demonstrates a
clear understanding
of the States of Matter
and what it means
to the student.

MODIFICATIONS:
I am aware that modifications will be made for students who did not master the objectives and for those ready for
enrichment. However, modifications are not covered in this course and are not part of this particular lesson.

Student Sample:

States of Matter (Sample)

STATES OF MATTER

SOLID

LIQUID

GAS

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Atoms are packed


tightly together.

Molecules dont move


around.

There is space between


the atoms.

Molecules slightly
move around all of the
time.

There is so much space


between the atoms.

Molecules are always


moving.

ILLUSTRATION

WHY PICTURE WAS


CHOSEN
It shows that solids are
tightly packed together
and do not have any room
to move around.

It shows there is little


space between the atoms
and as a result, the atoms
are able to slightly move
around.

It shows that because there


is a lot of space between
the molecules, they are
able to move around freely
in all directions but
repeatedly collide and
bounce off of other
molecules.