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SPE 88696

Well Integrity Management System (WIMS)


ZAKUM DEVELOPMENT COMPANY (ZADCO)
ABU DHABI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Jamal Al- Ashhab, Mohamed Afzal, Dr. Cornelius O. Emenike
Copyright 2004, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc.
This paper was prepared for presentation at the 11th Abu Dhabi international Petroleum
Exhibition and Conference held in Abu Dhabi, U.A.E., 1013 October 2004.
This paper was selected for presentation by an SPE Program Committee following review of
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presented, have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to
correction by the author(s). The material, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any
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Box 833836, Richardson, TX 75083-3836, U.S.A., fax 01-972-952-9435.

ABSTRACT
ZADCO owns more than 500 wells operating in UZ, UA
& ST fields to contribute in achieving the production
targets as set by the Shareholders. To ensure that wells
operate as designed for their assigned life (or greater)
with all risks kept as low as reasonably practicable or as
mentioned, it is important to insure individual wells
integrity. Hence, ZADCO developed an in-house Well
Integrity Management System (WIMS), which defines &
provides the operating standards & guidelines for
maintaining the well integrity parameters, ensuring safe
well operations and securing well potential availability
during its life cycle so that return on investment is
maximized without the sacrifice of safety and
environment.
The implementation of ZADCOs well integrity process
follows the cycle assurance testing, preventive
measures, monitoring, evaluation / assessment, control
& remedy, audit / verification.
This paper reviews WIMS in ZADCO. WIMS is
structured to include wellhead (surface) equipment,
downhole equipment and operational (process control).
WIMS places much emphasis on the requirement of
barriers for safety and environmental protection.
Key Words:
Well Integrity Management System, Well Barriers,
Wellhead Equipment, Sub-surface Equipment, Scale
& Corrosion Management, Risk Management.

INTRODUCTION:
The objective of developing Well Integrity Management
System (WIMS) is to provide standard guidelines to
ensure that technical integrity of all the wells is
maintained throughout their life cycle, they operate
under safe condition and are capable to function
continuously to achieve the targeted production/injection
requirements. Well integrity is based on the
establishment and maintenance of confinement barriers
in the particular well. As per WIMS standards, a well is
considered integral if at least two separate and sound
confinement barriers across each flow path between the
potential reservoir and surface are available all the time.
WIMS very much emphasis on the problem prevention
based approach (endeavour to predict & solve the
problem before it happens) that can accommodate
several direct advantages and benefits like reduction in
operating down time, enhancement in well control and
safety aspects, minimized unplanned repair intervention
& cost impact etc.
Major well issues that would have impact on the
technical integrity and operability of a well viz; Surface
Completion Components (Wellhead & X-mass tree),
Sub-surface Completion Components (downhole safety
valve (DHSV), Gas lift valves, electric submersible pump
(ESP), Well Construction (Casing & Annulus),
Communication Problems, Corrosion, Scaling, Nonhydrocarbon Effluents / Products, Well Operation
Suspension, Well Intervention Services (Electric/Slick
Line, Stimulation, coiled tubing unit (CTU), Risk
Management Process & Auditing System, etc. have
been thoroughly discussed in the WIMS manual.
WELL BARRIERS:
The barrier is a protection measure to prevent an
uncontrolled release of hydrocarbons to surface via
production strings or from reservoir to well annulus.
Primary barriers always control immediately the wells
up-stream side pressure, whereas secondary barriers,
which normally have no well-bore pressure against
them, immediately supplement the primary barriers
(Fig.1). A barrier that loses its integrity is classified as

SPE 88696

non-integral barrier provided that a visible leak is


detected in the surface barrier or if the maximum
operating pressure in wellhead component exceeds its
working pressure or the H2S contents in the annulus fluid
exceeds the NACE MR01-75 conditions. Corrosive
environment, non-compatibility of elastomers with well
effluents, leak rate and higher temperatures are the
major factors that affect the resistance of the structural
barrier (Annulus).

Seals Integrity:

For gas wells, tubing hanger s metal-to-metal neck


seal should not be tested from x-mass tree flange as
it may cause the seal to collapse. However, the
same port can be used for monitoring purpose. It is
advisable to approach the concerned vendor for
proper seal integrity test.

The test pressure for tubing hanger seals is


recommended to be equivalent to the working
pressure of x-mass tree. However, in case of casing
hanger seals, 60% of the concerned casing collapse
pressure is considered as the test limit.

Hydraulic oil is recommended to be the test medium


and constant readings for 10 minutes of the test
pressure are considered as the acceptance criteria
for each test.

Check valves from any of the port should never be


removed unless pressure behind it is zero.

WELL BARRIER ENVELOPE

PRIMARY BARRIER

SECONDARY BARRIER

X-MASS TREE

EXIT TO TEST SUB SEAL


TUBING HANGER SEALS

RING GASKET
NEEDLE VALVE
PRODUCTION
ANNULUS
CONTROL LINE

DOWN HOLE SAFETY


VALVE
PRODUCTION CASING
TUBING STRING
KILL FLUID

Performance Testing of Static Components:

9 5/8 DUAL PKR

7 LINER TOP

CEMENT
FLOW UPPER ZONE
7 PERMENANT PKR

Gate valve bodies, crosses, tees, tubing/casing hangers


and every cavity that exists between several
components are classified as static components. These
components can be tested hydraulically or against
wellhead shut-in pressure and the acceptable criterion
should be no visible leak detection. Testing frequency for
static components is recommended to be the 2 years,
irrespective of any test procedure.

FLOW LOWER ZONE

Performance Testing of Mobile Components:


Fig. 1 Well Barrier Envelop

WELLHEAD COMPLETION MANAGEMENT:


Wellhead and X-mass tree play a vital role in controlling
the well flow. It is therefore quite necessary to
test/assure the integrity of all the components including
valves & seals. Special attention to gas wells surface
components is considered mandatory. The performance
monitoring, testing and remedial work data should be
recorded in the prescribed forms as provided in the
WIMS manual. Key guidelines and test procedures are
highlighted as following:
Gate Valves Integrity:

Wellhead shut-in pressure and well fluid are to be


used as test medium and the test duration should be
minimum 15 minutes.

Bubble test is to be considered as the acceptance


criteria for gas wells. However, leak rate should be
evaluated before further action is taken.

Leaking valves are to be greased to confirm the test


results.

The gates, seats, stem packing and gate valve plugs are
classified as mobile components. These components
can be tested hydraulically or against wellhead shut-in
pressure. In case of hydro test, 110% of the maximum
expected operating pressure of the component and in
other cases; maximum achievable wellhead shut-in
pressure for 10 minutes at least is considered the test
limits. The acceptable criterion should be no visible
external leak & zero pressure drops. Testing frequency
for x-mass tree valves is recommended to be the 6
months and for annuli valves to be the one-year.
Valves Integrity Failure Causes & Cures:
Malfunction

Cause

Cures

Wells
pressure
leaks
past
valve.
Line
fluid
leaks between
valve
body
and bonnet.
Downhole
eqpt. will not

Valve gate and


seat leak / are
not
installed
properly
Bonnet gasket
leaks.

Disassemble the
valve and reinstall
the gate and seat.

Valve gate not


aligned

Tighten the bonnet


nuts.
If
leak
persists, replace
the bonnet gasket.
Disassemble the
valve and adjust

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pass through
open valve.
Valve jumps
open
when
pressure
is
applied
to
actuator.
Valve
does
not close.

Will not open


or close.

Hard
operate.

to

properly.
Excessive
pressure
differential
across
valve
gate.
Pressure
remains
in
actuator
cylinder.
Excessive
friction on gate.
Hydrates or ice
in valve body.
Insufficient
lubricant.
Restriction
body cavity.

in

Erratic
operation.

Iced up due to
restricted flow,
hydrates or low
temperatures.
Accumulation of
mud, sand or
other
foreign
matter in valve
body.
Stem threads
damaged.
Shear
pin
dragging
on
bearing cover.
Stem or stem
nut is broken or
threads
are
stripped.
Sheer pin is
broken.
Gate
not
properly aligned
with bore of
seats.
Stem threads
damaged.

Leaking
bonnet flange.
Leaking
around stem.

Bearing needs
to be lubricated.
Bearings
are
broken.
Leaking bonnet
seal ring.
Packing and/or
stem damaged.

Will not seal

Worn

Hand-wheel
not working.

Restriction in
bore of valve.

or

gate position on
stem.
Pressurize
downstream flow
line to approx.
75% of existing
well pressure.
Bleed off actuator
pressure.
Lubricate
valve.

the

Warm the valve


body
to
melt
hydrates
See
lubrication
instructions.
See venting and
lubrication
instructions. Work
hand-wheel back
and forth sharply.
If ice or hydrates,
apply heat before
venting and lubing.
Vent and apply
heat to valve body.
(Do not use an
open flame).
See venting and
lubrication
instructions.

Grease fitting
leaking.

Call field control


center
(FCC)
representative.
Replace sheer pin.
Stroke valve fully
several
cycles
from full open to
full close position.
Back up from hard
operating
spot
before continuing
in one direction.
Replace
when
practical.
Lubricate
bearings.
Replace bearings.
Replace seal ring.
Replace packing
or
stem
as
needed.
Replace
worn

Tighten cap
replace fitting.

or

Preventive Maintenance:
Preventive maintenance is aimed at maintaining the
wellhead equipment as per procedures specified by the
manufacturer, extend the components life cycle and
avoid harsh fluid entrapping inside gate valves cavity.
Preventive maintenance is further divided in two
categories viz routine-based and non routine-based.
Routine-based preventive maintenance at regular
interval is purposed to flush out the sludge/debris from
body cavity and provide lubrication to valve stem
threads, bushing & gate/seat sealing surface in addition
to protection against corrosion. On the other hand, non
routine-based preventive maintenance is purposed to
protect the x-mass tree and valves internals from the
expected corrosion attack as result of stimulation, killing,
injection and descaling or polymer treatment operations.
General guidelines for the preventive maintenance are
highlighted as following:

No job to be started without work permit.

Cathodic protection system to be removed and


remote operating system to be bypassed prior
starting maintenance job.

Greasing pressure should never exceed the working


pressure of the valves.

The type of grease to be used as per API standard


and the amount of grease and application
procedures to be followed as per concerned
equipment manufacturers recommendation.

It should be ensured that grease flows through valve


cavity.

All wells to be treated as hazardous and never


attempt to remove or tighten any thing under
pressure.

Proper inhibitor to be used to flush out the valve


cavity after each stimulation job.

Repair or replace.
Realign pin.

Safety cap not


on
tight
enough.

Hydraulic Actuators Preventive Maintenance:


Hydraulic actuators are the most important components
with respect to their response (quick opening or closure)
against any abnormal or normal situation. Therefore,
implementation of an effective periodical preventive
maintenance program can ensure their integrity and
smooth operation. It is recommended that all the
actuators must be function tested every 3 months and
they must close with in 30 seconds.

SPE 88696

SUB-SURFACE COMPLETION MANAGEMENT:


Sub-surface components of any well construction play
an important role in well operation & well safety. It is
therefore considered necessary to ensure that subsurface components of a well functions properly and
their integrity remains intact through out their life cycle.
Description of key sub-surface components and the
standards/guidelines to test assure their integrity is
discussed as following.
Down Hole Safety Valve:
Two types of down hole safety valves viz surface
controlled sub-surface safety valve (SCSSV) & subsurface controlled sub-surface safety valves (SSCSSV)
are in place to control the well flow during any abnormal
situation. SCSSV type valves, either tubing retrievable or
wireline retrievable, operate to open by hydraulic
pressure applied to a piston valve via control line and
close by a counter acting spring. On the other hand,
SSCSSV type valves like velocity valve (storm choke) &
injection valve operate to close directly by the abnormal
behavior of produced or injected fluid.
It is recommended that open/close function of the down
hole safety valves to be checked every 3 months and
pressure test performance (bleed off above valve) to be
reviewed every 6 months. The degree of DHSV integrity
depends on the observed leak rate, which can be
calculated as per Eq.1.
Q = 60*{(P2-P1) / (T2-T1)}*V Eq. 1

Where,
Q
P2
P
T2-T1

=
=
=
=

Leak rate in SCF/hr


Final pressure in psig
Initial pressure in psig
Time in minutes when pressure increases
from P1 to P2
Volume in cubic feet

Leak rate of 6.3 USG/hr. for oil wells and 400 USG/hr.
for water wells is considered to be acceptable. In case of
gas wells, acceptable leak rate depends on tubing size.
For example, 124 psig/hr. pressure build-up in a 3
tubing is considered acceptable in ZADCO. Any test
failure is to be recorded in the prescribed Failure Report
form as provided in the WIMS manual.
Preventive Maintenance:
In order to avoid any risk in operating DHSV due to any
solids, scale or asphaltene deposition on its body or due
to packing deterioration, it is imperative to replace the
DHSV every year in gas wells and every 2-3 years in oil
or water wells. Besides, every time when the DHSV is
pulled out of hole during any down hole operation, it
must be thoroughly inspected, serviced or even
replaced if its overall condition is found deteriorated.
DHSV should be repaired and function tested in an

API approved workshop as per API standards API


Spec. 14A.
Gas Lift Valves:
Gas lift valves are the key components of any gas lift
wells construction. Prior to the installation of any gas lift
valve, its integrity should be ensured according to API
Spec. 11V1 by performing different tests e.g. bellows
assembly test, stem-seat test, reverse flow valve
leakage test etc. All these tests should be performed in
accordance
to
manufacturers
specification
&
procedures.
As a first step towards post-completion integrity
preventive measures for new wells, where tubing and
annulus are both filled with completion fluid, it is highly
recommended to strictly follow the standard unloading
procedures. In case of the already unloaded wells, same
procedures are normally applied but with certain
deviations like casing pressure can be increased fair
rapidly as no completion fluid exists in the annulus and
the well kicks off much quicker.
It is important to establish a track record of the gas lift
valves usage history and maintenance data. Whenever
the gas lift valves are retrieved for repair or replacement
purpose, Failure Report form, as provided in the WIMS
manual, shall be prepared.
SCALE MANAGEMENT:
The objective of scale management is to define the
preventive, corrective and monitoring policy to prevent,
treat and control the scale deposition and behavior in UZ
wells. Normally two major types of scale deposits are
found across the tubing strings in Zadco wells, which are
hard and solid state in shape (Fig. 2)
1. Strontium Sulfate (SrSO4) represents approximately
70% of the overall scale deposition cases.
2. Calcium sulfate (CaSO4) represents approximately
25% of the overall scale deposition cases.
3. The remaining 5% scale deposition cases comprised
of miscellaneous such as carbonates and corrosion
by products.
The main cause of such scale deposition in the
producing wells is the incompatibility between the
formation water (enriched with minerals) and injected
seawater (enriched with Sulfates / Carbonates). Scaling
phenomena occurs due to reaction between the minerals
& Sulfates / Carbonates when the injected seawater
breaks through and mixes with formation water
accompanied with change in thermodynamic conditions.
Scaling Impact on Well Integrity:
Technical integrity of tubular is badly affected with scale

SPE 88696

deposits as it causes the cross sectional flow area of a


string (ID) to reduce or completely plug off, which
ultimately results in partial or total production loss.
Safety barrier integrity by eliminating the functioning of,
down hole safety valve (DHSV) and the check valve
(NRV) installed at the surface flow lines, is also affected
by scale deposits. In addition, it restricts achieving the
reservoir-monitoring program.
Scale Monitoring Program:
Fig. 2 Scale Deposits

Two monitoring systems are in place to track the scale


deposition and production parameters across the
completion / production facilities.
a.

Mechanical System

b.

Wireline tubing check for tubing clearance.


Choke calibration and NRV inspection/ function
test on annual basis.
Scale sampling from the strings suspected with
scale deposits.

CORROSION MANAGEMENT:
This section addresses corrosion management of wells.
It is known that corrosion is a major threat to wells.
Hence, strenuous efforts are made to contain corrosion
in all its ramifications. Emphasis is, therefore, put on
corrosion management as a means to assure asset
integrity.
Corrosion management is divided broadly into corrosion
control and corrosion monitoring.

Prediction System (Simulation Model)

Corrosion Control:
Zadco has developed Simulation Model (software
program) to predict the wells/ strings that might have
scaling tendency.
Produced water analysis
parameters are loaded in the model on monthly
basis as well as the wet strings are further updated
for mechanical monitoring to confirm the potential of
scale deposition. Proactive scale treatment is
planned on model prediction results.
Scale Prevention & Remedial Process:
Frequent wireline gauge cutter / scratchier runs should
be made in the strings, producing water or have scale
potential, to prevent / remove scale deposits. In case
wireline tools fail to remove the scale deposits then
following two methods should be used to remove the
scaling.
a.

Material Selection:
Material section for completion string, casing and x-mass
tree depends on the reservoir and process operating
conditions, the stings are either carbon steel (L-80) or
13% Cr (L-80). After gas breakthrough (GBT) in Upper
Zakum the string material may be upgraded. Selection
of material for the strings is generally carried out by the
aid of software ZADCORE, the ZADCO down hole
corrosion model. Casing is made of carbon steel (Grade
C-75) and x-mass tree material selection is based on
API6A. ZADCOs current x-mass tree grade is EE trim.

Chemical Treatment (Scale thickness <0.5)

Affected tubing string is soaked with appropriates


scale removal chemical solvent for 48 hours and
then flowed back. Agitation action with wireline tools
is performed after 24 hours.
b.

This is achieved by material selection, corrosion inhibitor


squeeze treatment, continuous inhibitor injection, water
injection treatment, annulus brine treatment and WHPT
structure Cathodic protection.

Mechanical Treatment (Scale thickness >0.5)

Tubing string with heavy & hard scale deposits are


mechanically treated by using Jet Blaster Tool on
coiled tubing and pumping down the gelled water
and beads mixture to remove and lift the scale
deposits.

Corrosion Inhibitor Squeeze Treatment:


This treatment is used for the protection of some existing
carbon steel production tubing so that life is possibly
prolonged till the production string is replaced with
13%Cr. All low potential production wells equipped with
carbon steel tubing having no serious scaling and
annulus pressure problem, with produced water cut in
excess of 2% should be squeeze treated with corrosion
inhibitor on regular basis. Wells due for imminent work
over are also excluded from squeeze treatment.
The quantity of inhibitor to be squeezed should be
calculated in accordance with a semi empirical formula
which is based on 60 ppm rate over 120 days
production. This does may change according to the

prevailing water cuts or the monitoring results in order to


achieve maximum protection period, which is targeted as
4 months per each treatment selection of inhibitor is
based on laboratory compatibility testing followed by
field trials.

SPE 88696

Downhole Corrosion Coupons:


Corrosion coupons are hung inside tubing tail pipes for a
standard period of time (usually one month) then
retrieved to calculate the tubing corrosion rate. This
method is used to achieve the following:

Continuous Inhibition Injection:


For gas lift wells, corrosion inhibitor should be
continuously injected in the gas lift line at the inlet to the
annulus between the string and 9 5/8 casing. The
purpose is to provide protection to the carbon steel
production tubing and associated WHPT production
manifold and subsea oil production lines.

1. Establish the corrosion inhibitor squeeze adequacy


according to the prevailing process conditions and
water cut.
2. Develop the inhibitor batch volume in order to
ensure maximum protection period.
3. Compare the different inhibitor performance hence
the selection of cost effective corrosion inhibitor.

Water Injection Treatment:

Analyses of Annulus Fluids:

The injection water is treated for corrosion protection at


the water treatment plant for oxygen removal and
biocide control.

Samples from high annulus pressure wells are to be


collected for compositional analyses for water and oil.
These analyses are reviewed in the context of risk and
asset integrity.

Annulus Brine Treatment:


Wellhead (Surface) Corrosion Coupons:
Packer fluid inhibitor contains biocide, corrosion inhibitor
and oxygen scavenger. Three of the chemicals shall be
compatible (pitting and crevice attacks are potential
problems). Oxygen scavenging may be slow & costly.
For any stream that will be stagnant such as packer
fluid, the total corrosion resulting from the dissolved
oxygen is very small and is over as soon as the oxygen
is consumed. The oxygen scavenger needs to be
added in pump down. The suppliers of Clear brines do
not like to do this as it makes the fluid somewhat cloudy.
But this reduces corrosion more than anything else.

Corrosion coupons are installed on few wellheads to


measure corrosion potential inside tubing, etc.
Similarly, corrosion coupons are also installed in the few
water injection headers to measure corrosion in the
surface piping. For water injection limits of corrosion
coupons are set at 2MPY corrosion rates, in case of high
corrosion rate or bacterial activity, measures like pigging
and biocide treatment are taken which indirectly reduces
the risk of corrosion inside the water injection tubing.
Water Injection Monitoring:

WHPT Structure Cathodic Protection:


WHPT sub-sea structure is protected with (Al-alloy)
sacrificial anodes installed at different parts on the
structural members including conductor pipes. However,
as per new strategy, 30 conductor pipes exposed to the
surface are to be painted prior to installation.

Injection water quality is being monitored at the surface


of the injection platform at the rate of 1-2 times per
month. This monitoring involves the assessment of
Sulphate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) activity either through
a water sample or through a biostud at the platform
injection header, if available.

CORROSION MONITORING / INSPECTION:

IMPLEMENTATION OF WIMS:

The monitoring methods listed below are being carried


out on tubing of the well to ensure the corrosion control
measures and practices are adequate. They also
provide a feedback on extra measures to be taken to
ensure facility integrity.

This implementation involves function/ integrity test of


various well components at a defined frequency. This
summarized in the table below. The results are needed
for decision-making.

Caliper Survey:
Multifinger caliper surveys were extensively conducted
inside the tubing in the past to produce a model for
tubing corrosion. The surveys provided very useful data
about tubing metal loss with emphasis in corrosion
inhibitor efficiency and effectiveness. It shall be used
whenever this is required to establish a particular tubing
condition.

SPE 88696

COMPONENT

FUNCTION /
INTEGRITY TEST

MAINT. /
INSP.
FREQUENCY
3 months

Corrosion
Monitoring (Oil
Producers)

Monitor Corrosion
in tubing by WL
(installation
of
corrosion
coupons).
Carryout
CI
squeeze treatment
in the wells that
might
have
corrosion
tendency

Sticky Material
Monitoring
(Gas Injectors)

WL checks to
monitor
sticky
material presence
in tubing, DHSV,
nipple
profile.
Collect
samples
and analyze

3 months

H2/H2S
Monitoring

Monitor
annuli
gas,
collect
samples
and
analyze to check
for any presence
of H2 /H2S gas in
the annuli
Closely
monitor
near by producers
for
gas
break
through in gas
injection area.

6 months

Gas
Break
Through
Monitoring

3 months

ANNULUS INTEGRITY MANAGEMENT:


The annulus management is an essential part of the well
integrity process during the well operation phase as
producer or injector. Frequent testing of annulus
pressure shall be carried out in order to pin point those
wells, which may need investigation as to the cause of
the annulus pressure. Likewise, surface & down hole
communication tests shall be carried out on those wells
showing high annulus pressures so that rectification or
further investigation can be recommended. Annulus
integrity assessment process is shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 3 Annulus Integrity Assessment Process


RISK MANAGEMENT:
The risk management plays a crucial and integral role
during WIMS implementation. Risk based technique is
mandatory for effective well integrity management. Risk
elimination activity should focus on most critical work
and integrity / barriers. It is intended that all aspects of
will be conducted to maintain a level of risk As Low As
Reasonably Possible (ALARP).
Under specified operating conditions, there is no
intolerable risk of failure endangering the safety of
personnel, environment or asset value. Once hazards
are identified along with effects, a qualification and
evaluation of the effects have to be carried out mainly
their exposure to personnel, well, process and
environment. Risk assessment process shall follow the
ADNOC Risk Potential Matrix Qualitative criterion (Fig.
4).

SPE 88696

Risk Potential Matrix Qualitative


PROBABILITY
A

Severity

People

Assets

Environment

Reputation

5. Catastrophic

Mulitiple
fatalities or
permanent
total

Extensive damage
> 10 Million

Massive
effect

International
impact

4. Severe

Single fatality
or permanent
total disability

Major Damage
< 10 Million

Major
effect

National
impact

3. Critical

Major injury or
health effects

Local Damage
~ 0.5 Million

2. Marginal

Minor injury or
health effects

Minor Damage
~ 0.10 Million

Minor
effect

Minor
impact

1. Negligible

Slight injury or
health effects

Slight Damage
<0.01 Million

Slight
effect

Slight
impact

Happens
Has occurred Has occurred Has Occurred Several times Happens several
per year in
times per year
in World-wide
in other
in specific
industry but ADNOC Group ADNOC Group specific ADNOC in same location
Group
or operation
not in ADNOC
Company
Company
Company

HIGH RISK

Localised Considerab
effect
le impact

MEDIUM RISK

LOW RISK

Fig.4 Risk Potential Matrix Qualitative


CONCLUDING REMARKS:
In order to assess the compliance of UZ wells with the
developed standards and ensure their integrity, WIMS
implementation process was piloted on 15 selected wells
(8 Prod., 5 WI & 2 GI) by dividing into two section;
Wellhead Equipment Integrity & Downhole Equipment
Integrity. Extra resources (with additional budget) were
utilized during this pilot campaign. Couple of wells could
not be approached due to rig on location & hot work
activities on concerned wellhead platforms.
Downhole equipment integrity of all the approached
wells was found in compliance with WIMS standard. On
the other hand, x-mass tree valves of many wells were
found passing, hydraulic actuators closure time was
much higher than WIMS standard and a couple of wells
were bearing sustainable annulus pressure. Efforts are
in hand by the concerned maintenance team to rectify
the pointed faults & ensure the integrity of the affected
components.
The second campaign of WIMS Process on 60 more
wells comprising of different categories (Prod., WI & GI)
has been launched with the aim to complete it during
year 2004.

In order to make the campaign cost effective and to


avoid additional resources requirements & time, the
wells selection is synchronized with annual data
gathering schedule for the year 2004.