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HURRICANES

What is a
Hurricane?

A Hurricane is a rotating,
organized system of clouds
and thunderstorms that
forms over tropical waters

Hurricanes are Tropical


Storms (they only occur
in tropical areas)

How do
Hurricanes
Form?
Hurricanes start out as Thunderstorms!
Hurricanes get their energy from the evaporation of warm ocean
water (80oF or warmer)
As warm air above the ocean surface rises, it creates an area of low
pressure. This rising air cools and condenses forming clouds.
Cooler air swirls in to replace the rising air, and as the system of
clouds and wind grows and spins faster and faster, an eye forms in
the center.

Where Do Hurricanes Occur?


Hurricanes, or Tropical Storms, occur in warm
parts of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans

Tropical Storms have


REGIONALLY SPECIFIC NAMES
[Theyre called different names depending on where they occur]

Atlantic Ocean: Hurricanes


Pacific Ocean: Typhoons
Indian Ocean: Cyclones

The Path of Hurricane RITA


When hurricanes
move over land
they weaken & die
out

The Path of Hurricane IRENE


When hurricanes
move over cold
water they weaken
& die out

The Path of Hurricane


KATRINA

Notice that only states along the


coastlines of the Atlantic Ocean
and Gulf of Mexico have been
affected by Hurricanes!

WHEN Do Hurricanes Occur?

The Official Atlantic Hurricane Season: June 1st November 30th

What are the Parts of a Hurricane?


Eye Center; calm and clear. The eye is clear due to air sinking in the middle of it.
Eye Wall Clouds surrounding the eye that produce heavy rains and high winds; the
strongest part of a Hurricane
Rain Bands surround the eye wall; produce heavy rains and high winds
Storm Surge a rise in sea level due to heavy winds and low pressure; this is the part
of a hurricane that causes the most damage

Storm surge is the rising of the


sea level when a hurricane
makes landfall.
This is the most destructive
and deadly part of a
Hurricane!

Hurricanes are Classified


Using the Safir-Simpson Scale
Tropical Depression = semi-organized, rotating tropical storm
with wind speeds of 38 mph or less.
Tropical Storms = Well-organized tropical storm with wind
speeds of at least 39 mp. At this point, the storm is given a
name.

Once Wind Speeds reach 74 mph the Storm is called a "Hurricane


Remember: Hurricane IS JUST THE NAME WE USE in the Atlantic

Saffir-Simpson Scale
Category

Pressure
(mb)

Winds
(knots)

Depression

TD

-----

< 34

< 39

Green

Tropical Storm

TS

-----

34-63 39-73

Yellow

Hurricane

> 980

64-82 74-95

4-5

Red

Hurricane

965-980

83-95 96-110

6-8

Light Red

Hurricane

945-965

96-112

111-130

9-12

Magenta

Hurricane

920-945

113-135

131-155

13-18

Light Magenta

Hurricane

< 920

>135

>155

>18

White

Winds Surge
(ft)
(mph)

Line Color

NOTE: Pressures are in millibars and winds are in knots where one knot is equal to 1.15
mph

Category

Pressure
(mb)

Winds
(knots)

Depression

TD

-----

< 34

< 39

Green

Tropical Storm

TS

-----

34-63 39-73

Yellow

Hurricane

> 980

64-82 74-95

4-5

Red

Hurricane

965-980

83-95 96-110

6-8

Light Red

Hurricane

945-965

96-112

111-130

9-12

Magenta

Hurricane

920-945

113-135

131-155

13-18

Light Magenta

Hurricane

< 920

>135

>155

>18

White

Winds Surge
(ft)
(mph)

Line Color

Hurricanes are given names to make them easier to track

2014
Hurricane
Names: Is
YOUR
NAME on
the list?!

Hurricanes turn Counterclockwise in the Northern


Hemisphere and Clockwise in the Southern
Hemisphere due to the Coriolis effect!

Hurricane Hunters: Pilots who fly planes


through hurricanes in order to gather data so we
can improve our understanding of these storms.