Anda di halaman 1dari 7

Stephanie Vergauwen

Teaching Experiment 3
Formative Assessment Activity: _Sequencing Cards
Planned Date of Implementation: _02/10/2015__
Common Core State Standard(s):
HSA-REI.A.1: Explain each step in solving a simple equation as following from the equality of
numbers asserted at the previous step, starting from the assumption that the original equation has
a solution. Construct a viable argument to justify a solution method.
HSA-CED.A.1: Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve
problems.
Mathematical Practice(s):
MP3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
MP7: Look for and make use of structure.
Explain the grouping structure (i.e., individual, partner, group) and the reasoning for this
decision?
My students are currently arranged in pairs, as a way to encourage them to discuss
mathematical ideas and ask questions of their partner before asking the teacher. I typically try to
pair a high student with a low student, that way the low student can ask the high student
questions and clear up any misconceptions. This chapter I tried to put students with a friend or
someone they would be more likely to have discussions with, while trying to maintain a high-low
pairing. The students were arranged in groups during previous chapters, but that seemed to serve
as a source of distraction and off-topic conversation, rather than a medium for discussion and
collaborative work. The students seem to work much better in pairs, and the students who are
more reserved seem to speak up more in pairs than they do in groups. I plan on having the
students work with the person they are currently paired with, since that is who they have been
working with all chapter, and I will rearrange pairs if there are absent students to ensure that
everyone has a partner.
Goal(s) of Activity (i.e., Students will be able to and I canThese should include
mathematical content and process learning goals.)
1. Students will be able to solve exponential equations with unlike bases.
2. Students will be able to look for and make use of structure in order to determine the
proper sequence in solving exponential equations with unlike bases.
- This will be measured by listening to the discussions that the students are
having; specifically by noting observations that they make about the structure of the
equations. I will also have the students explain their reasoning for each step by writing a

Stephanie Vergauwen

3.
4.
5.
6.

description of what operation happened and why, which will indicate how they
interpreted the structure of the equations in order to properly sequence their cards.
Students will construct arguments to support their solutions, based on the property of
equality for exponential functions.
I can solve exponential equations when the bases are not the same.
I can correctly sequence the steps of solving exponential equations when the bases are not
the same.
I can explain my steps and justify my reasoning.

How will you elicit thinking from the students?


I will elicit thinking from the students by asking them to think about what they have
learned about exponential equations and how to find their solutions. Students will need to
consider the property of equality for exponential equations. I will also require that the students
explain their thinking and justify their steps. Some questions that I may ask to elicit thinking
from students include:
What do we know about exponential equations and their solutions?
How can we use what we know about the properties of exponents to find the solutions of
exponential equations?
What are some things that we notice about these exponential equations? What stands out
to you that you will need to take into consideration when solving for x? Why do you need
to take these into consideration? How do these relate to the concepts discussed in class?
How do you solve an exponential equation with like bases? What is different about
solving exponential equations with unlike bases? What steps need to be taken?
What are some common mistakes that people might make when solving these equations?
How can we fix these mistakes?
How do we know if our solution is correct? Does our solution make sense? How can we
check?
What data will you collect? How will you analyze the data you collect? (i.e., How will you
determine students have understood the material/content of the activity or reached the goal of the
activity? This should tie back to your above learning objectives.)
The data that I will collect will include taking pictures of how the students have
sequenced their cards, along with their explanations for each step. I will analyze the data with the
students to determine whether or not the cards have been sequenced correctly. If they have not, I
will ask the students to reconsider their sequence as well as their explanations to make sure that
they arrange them in a way that makes sense. I will determine that the students understand the
material and have reached the goal of the activity once they have correctly arranged and justified
their sequence of cards. While checking their work, I will ask the students questions about how
they determined the sequence and how they know that it is correct. I made eight different sets of

Stephanie Vergauwen

sequencing cards and each pair will be required to complete one set, meaning that some groups
will have the same sequences. If any students would like more practice, I will give them a
different set of cards to sequence and explain. Since this is a review activity, there will not be a
group discussion about the activity. I will have the pairs of students work at their own pace, and I
will have them turn in their explanations of the steps once they have their cards sequenced. From
there the students will have the remainder of the class time to work on their test review out of the
book, and while they are working on that I will be providing feedback to all pairs on the
explanations that they turned in. My hope is to get all of the feedback returned to the students by
the end of the hour, otherwise I will give it to them the next day.
How and what kind of feedback (written/verbal) will you give students? What is the
purpose of your feedback?
I will give the students verbal feedback to let them know whether or not their cards are
correctly sequenced. I will ask the students how they reached their final decision and how they
know that it is correct, and I will also question how they explained/justified their reasoning. I
will either agree with the students and their sequence of cards, or I will ask them to reconsider
their work and encourage them to use resources (book, notes, etc.) in order to correct their
sequence. I will also have the students turn in their explanations for why they sequenced their
cards the way they did, and their justifications for why those steps make sense. I will provide
feedback to all students on their explanations and hopefully return it to them by the end of the
hour. The purpose of my feedback is to challenge the students responses and make them justify
their thinking in order to demonstrate an understanding of how to solve exponential equations.

Stephanie Vergauwen

Stephanie Vergauwen

Stephanie Vergauwen

Stephanie Vergauwen