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Missouri Educator Profile (MEP)

CATHERINE EGGERT
08 May 2015

Development Report

Copyright 2013 NCS Pearson, Inc. Portions of this work were adapted by permission under license with Pearson Assessment, 80 Strand, London WC2R ORL.
No portions of this work may be reproduced without prior written permission from NCS Pearson, Inc.

Catherine
Eggert

INTRODUCTION

Page 2
of 11

Six Drivers of
Performance

Your Scores

Achievement

Social Influence

Interpersonal

Self Adjustment

Conscientiousness

Practical Intelligence

5
1

Low

How to Use the Missouri Educator


Profile (MEP) Development Report
Understanding your work personality is an important step
toward professional development. This report is designed to
help you increase your self-awareness.
The MEP measures work-relevant attitudes and behaviors that
contribute to or impede job performance in a school setting.
The scores reflect how someone is likely to approach their
work or interact with others in a work setting.
This report begins with a snapshot of your results (see above).
Pages 38 describe each work style domain in detail,
characteristics of high and low scores, and development
suggestions based on your results. Pages 911 offer step-by-step
guidance on how to develop your skills.

Average

10
High

Understanding Your Results


Your scores are based on how you responded to the
questions and the occupational group to which you were
compared (e.g., if you are a high school teacher, your
responses were compared to those of other high school
teachers). Your scores can change over time, but change
typically requires insight into your work style and focused
effort to intentionally change behavior.
Comparison (Norm) Group is
Early Childhood/Elementary Educator:
The scores are presented on a standardized ten-point scale.
A score of 5 means that you scored just below the
midpoint compared to others in your comparison group.
Validity of this Report:
You were less likely to acknowledge common self limitations
than most individuals. Responses suggest that you may have
tried to create a favorable impression, and as such, work style
scores may be slightly inflated.

Copyright 2013 NCS Pearson, Inc. Portions of this work were adapted by permission under license with Pearson Assessment, 80 Strand, London WC2R ORL.
No portions of this work may be reproduced without prior written permission from NCS Pearson, Inc.

Catherine
Eggert

ACHIEVEMENT

Page 3
of 11

Your Scores
Achievement/Effort
Exerts limited effort toward achieving goals; does not
set challenging goals

Persistence
May not persist in the face of difficulties, obstacles, or
when success seems unlikely

Initiative
Has limited interest in volunteering for or taking on
new work responsibilities or challenges

Achievement/Effort

Persistence

Initiative

Establishes and exerts extensive effort toward


achieving challenging work goals
Tends to be highly persistent on the job, even when
faced with obstacles or difficulties

Low

Average

Procrastinate
Give up too easily or compromise too quickly

10

Enjoys taking on new or additional work


responsibilities and challenges

High Scorers

What You See


in the
School Setting

How to Become a Higher Achiever


Get organized - set priorities, and then establish goals
with clear timelines and outcomes. Keep track of what
you need to do and when you will do it. Achievement
requires organized, disciplined effort.
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High

Low Scorers
Deliver inconsistent results

Pursue projects with a strong need to finish


Push self to achieve high quality results
Respond to challenging goals with hard work and
positive energy

How Supervisors/Mentors Can Support


Development
Focus on goal-setting and include one goal that will
require extra effort/growth to achieve. Establish
checkpoints to discuss their progress. Make sure
progress is clearly tracked and documented.
Describe the phases of a project or task prior to
assignment. Discuss potential barriers and brainstorm
how to overcome barriers. Set the standard that
problem-solving is expected when barriers arise.
Using behavioral examples from your school setting,
describe what initiative looks like and what you expect.
Discuss behaviors that meet minimum job requirements
and behaviors that reflect higher levels of initiative.

Copyright 2013 NCS Pearson, Inc. Portions of this work were adapted by permission under license with Pearson Assessment, 80 Strand, London WC2R ORL.
No portions of this work may be reproduced without prior written permission from NCS Pearson, Inc.

Catherine
Eggert

SOCIAL INFLUENCE

Page 4
of 11

Your Scores
Leadership Orientation
Has limited interest in taking charge and directing or
leading others; may hesitate to provide input or opinions

Social Orientation
Prefers working alone or in small groups; does not
actively seek out personal connections with colleagues

Leadership Orientation

Social Orientation

Is quick to take charge, lead others and offer opinions;


very high scorers may be overly assertive at times

Low

Average

Fail to establish strong interpersonal networks


Have difficulty taking charge of team projects or groups

10

Enjoys working with others; actively seeks out personal


connections with colleagues; very high scorers may not
be comfortable working alone

High Scorers

What You See


in the
School Setting

How to Increase Social Influence


When leading a project or group, think about what you
want to communicate before you speak. Write down
the points you want to make and how you want to
communicate them (e.g., level of energy, enthusiasm).
Make eye contact and avoid long pauses.
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High

Low Scorers
Have difficulty influencing or persuading others

Exert influence and present a compelling message


Seek out others; come across as outgoing and friendly
Emerge as a team or project leader

How Supervisors/Mentors Can Support


Development
Ask for their input in every meeting. Create space for
them to speak and actively encourage them to offer input,
opinions and advice. Help increase their visibility.
Help increase their social interactions; invite them to lunch
with others; get to know them. Assign a few projects that
require considerable interaction but do not overwhelm
them with too much people contact.

Copyright 2013 NCS Pearson, Inc. Portions of this work were adapted by permission under license with Pearson Assessment, 80 Strand, London WC2R ORL.
No portions of this work may be reproduced without prior written permission from NCS Pearson, Inc.

Catherine
Eggert

INTERPERSONAL

Page 5
of 11

Your Scores
Cooperation
May not consistently demonstrate a good-natured,
helpful, pleasant style

Concern for Others


May not consistently show empathy and insight into
the feelings and needs of others

Cooperation

Concern for Others

Is likely to be seen by others as good-natured,


approachable and quick to help others

Low

Average

Are perceived as impersonal or insensitive


Fail to consider how their behavior impacts others

10

Viewed by others as perceptive and caring, able to


discern other peoples feelings and needs

High

Low Scorers
Fail to establish collaborative relations with peers

High Scorers

What You See


in the
School Setting

How to Increase Interpersonal Effectiveness


Pay attention to when you are at your best in listening
and expressing concern for others. When are you less
effective? Pay attention to your own personal strengths
and weaknesses (e.g., not too tired). Try to manage
situations that allow you to use your strengths.
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Study three people who are very effective at
cooperating with others. When do they cooperate,
how do they do it, and when do they pull back?
Compare your behavior with what they do and look
for ways to improve.

Are seen as a team player


Gain trust and support from others
Are empathic and tactful; strive for cooperative and
courteous relationships

How Supervisors/Mentors Can Support


Development
Coach deeper cooperation skills by focusing on how to
create clear goals and outcomes for all involved and the
importance of understanding work requirements as part of
the collaborative effort.
Review more complicated situations at school and ask
them how they see the situation and the reactions and
emotions people are experiencing. Give your perspective
or read of the situation/people and explain how you
arrived at that interpretation. The goal is to increase
awareness of the needs of others in complicated situations.

Copyright 2013 NCS Pearson, Inc. Portions of this work were adapted by permission under license with Pearson Assessment, 80 Strand, London WC2R ORL.
No portions of this work may be reproduced without prior written permission from NCS Pearson, Inc.

Catherine
Eggert

SELF ADJUSTMENT

Page 6
of 11

Your Scores
Self Control
Expresses emotions openly and may have difficulty
containing emotions when provoked

Stress Tolerance
Becomes uncomfortable in high pressure situations or
when under stress; sensitive to criticism

Adaptability/Flexibility
Prefers a standard, predictable, routine school environment

Self Control

Stress Tolerance

Adaptability/Flexibility

Keeps emotions in check even in difficult situations

Remains calm in high pressure situations; accepts criticism

Low

Average

Lose their composure

Become uncomfortable with change or ambiguity

10

Enjoys change and variety in the school setting;


comfortable with ambiguity

High

Low Scorers

Have trouble managing stress

High Scorers

What You See


in the
School Setting

How to Increase Adjustment


Every job has its stressors, so managing your response
to stress is a necessity. Remember, you can choose
how you respond and react to any situation. A
situation doesn't need to be stressful, if you don't
interpret it that way.
Dealing constructively with negative information and
criticism is part of being effective at school. Practice
putting things into perspective and being more open to
feedback. Look for ways to de-personalize the
information/feedback, and open yourself up for growth.
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Manage emotions productively


Remain calm in stressful or high pressure situations
Remain open to change and deal constructively with
uncertainty or ambiguity

How Supervisors/Mentors Can Support


Development
Discuss frustrations that they are likely to face in the
future. Help them prepare by anticipating and analyzing
these types of new situations.
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Copyright 2013 NCS Pearson, Inc. Portions of this work were adapted by permission under license with Pearson Assessment, 80 Strand, London WC2R ORL.
No portions of this work may be reproduced without prior written permission from NCS Pearson, Inc.

Catherine
Eggert

CONSCIENTIOUSNESS

Page 7
of 11

Your Scores
Dependability
May be casual or inconsistent about completing
work obligations

Attention to Detail
May miss or overlook important details

Rule Following
May not strictly adhere to rules or regulations across
all situations

Dependability

Attention to Detail

Seeks to consistently fulfill obligations with


quality performance
Is likely to excel at tasks requiring a strong focus on
details and thoroughness

Rule Following

10
1

Low

Average

May overlook important details in plans or projects


Set their own standards or create their own rules

10

Strictly adheres to rules and regulations; does things


by the book

High

Low Scorers
Need to be reminded about commitments and due dates

High Scorers

What You See


in the
School Setting

How to Become More Conscientious


Make sure you have the time to concentrate when
reviewing important information. Remind yourself to pay
attention to the details.
Get impatient when faced with a lot of information? Break
it down into chunks and analyze/review each carefully.
Avoid the temptation to skip and skim.
You strongly prefer following rules and may feel challenged
in situations that are ambiguous. In those situations, focus
on gathering more information before making judgments.

Complete work on a timely basis as promised


Are thorough in checking the quality of their work
Follow rules and protocol with great care
and consistency

How Supervisors/Mentors Can Support


Development
Discuss situations where inconsistency in delivering results
has been a problem. Brainstorm solutions and make sure
they leave the meeting with 1 or 2 well-defined action
items aimed at eliminating the inconsistency. Track their
progress on those action items.
Describe situations where high attention to detail is
important on the job. Make sure they know when
attending to details is most important. Encourage more
patience and attention to quality.
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Copyright 2013 NCS Pearson, Inc. Portions of this work were adapted by permission under license with Pearson Assessment, 80 Strand, London WC2R ORL.
No portions of this work may be reproduced without prior written permission from NCS Pearson, Inc.

Catherine
Eggert

PRACTICAL INTELLIGENCE

Page 8
of 11

Your Scores
Innovation
Follows a conventional approach and uses established
practices when addressing issues or problems

Analytical Thinking
May not analyze complex issues in depth; may miss
opportunities to use logic to resolve issues or problems

Independence
Prefers others to define tasks and ways of doing
things; may be uncomfortable with ambiguity

Innovation

Analytical Thinking

Independence

Enjoys producing new or creative ideas to address


job-related issues or problems
Enjoys analyzing complex issues in depth and using
logic to address job-related issues or problems

Low

Average

Fail to organize and analyze complex issues so that


they can be solved more effectively

10
High

Low Scorers
Have difficulty adopting new or innovative methods
or practices

Prefers freedom to guide self with little or no


supervision; develops own way of doing things; deals
comfortably with ambiguity

High Scorers

What You See


in the
School Setting

Struggle when required to create their own work plans


and processes

How to Increase Practical Intelligence


You prefer sticking with established methods. Identify
three established processes or procedures at school.
Review each and list three things that could be done
differently to add value or efficiency.
Learn more by reading about brainstorming techniques
and creativity. To open your mind to possibilities, practice
asking more "what if" questions and suspending judgment.
Spend more time figuring out how you can accomplish a
task/project/goal. Figure out what you need and how to
get it done. Check with your supervisor/mentor AFTER
you have come up with solutions.

Pursue different or new ways to approaching problems


Are prone to use a logical problem-solving and
decision-making approach
Guide themselves with little or no supervision

How Supervisors/Mentors Can Support


Development
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Give them stretch assignments that require analysis of
complex situations. Help them work through the strategic
goals and how to identify which information is relevant,
how to analyze it, and how to make recommendations.
Shift toward coaching rather than directing: ask them to
define project goals, describe how they are going to
accomplish work, how they are going to monitor progress.
Ask questions and provide feedback, but reduce directives.

Copyright 2013 NCS Pearson, Inc. Portions of this work were adapted by permission under license with Pearson Assessment, 80 Strand, London WC2R ORL.
No portions of this work may be reproduced without prior written permission from NCS Pearson, Inc.

Catherine
Eggert

PLAN YOUR DEVELOPMENT

Page 9
of 11

Be specific
Building educator skills requires a well thought-out and detailed plan of action.
1. Select a domain for development.
(see Six Drivers of Performance, p. 2).
Which domain will you focus on first?

2. Review the full page description of that domain.


(Place a
by the suggestions you want to practice)

Tip
It is best to focus on one
development area at a time
and to practice and receive
feedback for 3-6 months.
Tip
Ask your advisor for input
Make sure you both agree
on priority.

Describe what you will do in your school setting.

What will you do more frequently? What will you stop doing?
More

Stop

How can your supervisor/mentor best help you?

Tip
Work on specific behaviors to build
specific skills.
Understanding how specific
behaviors connect to outcomes helps
you learn more quickly.

Copyright 2013 NCS Pearson, Inc. Portions of this work were adapted by permission under license with Pearson Assessment, 80 Strand, London WC2R ORL.
No portions of this work may be reproduced without prior written permission from NCS Pearson, Inc.

Catherine
Eggert

PLAN YOUR DEVELOPMENT

Page 10
of 11

Practice
Skill building requires practice. Commit to the time it will take.
1. Practice your target skills and avoid unwanted behaviors.
When or in what situations will you practice the behaviors you want to increase?
Tip
Each morning review your
schedule and identify
opportunities where you can
practice positive and avoid
unwanted behaviors.

When do you slide into behaviors that you want to stop doing (i.e., behaviors that interfere or
compete with your goals)?

Tip
Create a weekly log and put a
by each day that you
practice the target skill. At the
end of each week, review how
many days you actually
practiced. Practice each day.
Even if it is only one action,
doing something daily will help
you apply your skills more
consistently over time.

Get Feedback
Timely, accurate, and constructive feedback is essential for growth.
1. Give your supervisor/mentor a copy of your report so that he/she can use the
coaching suggestions. Review the report together.
How often will you get feedback from your supervisor/mentor?

Who else do you want to get feedback from?


Tip
Ask for feedback from someone
who will help you develop someone who can give you
informed, honest, constructive
and respectful feedback.

Copyright 2013 NCS Pearson, Inc. Portions of this work were adapted by permission under license with Pearson Assessment, 80 Strand, London WC2R ORL.
No portions of this work may be reproduced without prior written permission from NCS Pearson, Inc.

Catherine
Eggert

POST YOUR PLAN

Page 11
of 11

My Development Plan
Review each day to reinforce learning.
I will increase:

Action(s) I will take:


Where

When

Resources

Who will give me feedback?


When
1
2
How will I know Im making progress?

Copyright 2013 NCS Pearson, Inc. Portions of this work were adapted by permission under license with Pearson Assessment, 80 Strand, London WC2R ORL.
No portions of this work may be reproduced without prior written permission from NCS Pearson, Inc.