Anda di halaman 1dari 6

THE CLASSIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS 1

The classification of commercial Unmanned Aircraft Systems


Kyle Heinz
Eastern New Mexico University

The classification of commercial Unmanned Aircraft Systems

THE CLASSIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS 2

Background Information
The realm of sizes of in the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) sector is vast. To address
the problem of regulation and National Air Space (NAS) inclusion, they are being proposed into
classes. Small UAS will have to weigh under 55lbs and micro UAS will be further down to
4.4lbs. These two classes because of size and market forces will not be required to have FAA
airworthiness certificates. They will be required to have aircraft markings so that they can be
identified.
The FAA kicked off the UAS preparation by chartering the small UAS Aviation
Rulemaking Committee (ARC). The ARCs mission was implementation of small UAS in the
NAS; much like the FAAs problem about full size UAS in the NAS. The ARC took a year and
came back with NAS safety guidelines; since then theyve both been working on a singular final
proposal.
Moving forward into 2012, Congress passed the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of
2012. This adds another section on Public Law 112-95, with 333 directing the consensus whether
the implementation of UAS in the NAS could be done safely prior to the full conclusion of
section 332s comprehensive findings. That brings us to this NPRM, and its implementation of
guidelines for small UAS for the near future, with the public being able to voice their opinions.
The drivers of this NPRM are the guidelines for the operational limitations, operator
certification and responsibilities, and aircraft requirements. The offshoot is recreational and
hobbyist UAS, which is left out of this NPRM. The FAAs 91-57 circular guidelines still apply
for now to those areas of experimentation.

THE CLASSIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS 3

Starting with operational limitations the ARC has deemed that small-unmanned aircraft
must remain under 55lbs in weight. There is consideration going into whether the airframe
should be fragile enough that it would break apart on impact should something go catastrophic in
flight, thus preventing injury to others on the ground. The operations of flight would only be
permitted during the daylight hours and the minimum weather visibility would be 3 miles from
the ground control station. No operations are allowed in Class A (18,000 feet +), yet Class B, C,
D, and E are allowed with Air Traffic Controls (ATC) permission. Operations in Class G are
allowed without ATCs permission.
Operator certification and responsibilities are relaxed and minor. From here well discuss
this as an individual to keep it simple. There will be an initial aeronautical test to demonstrate
your understanding of the NAS at an FAA approved testing center. Next will be submitting for a
routine Transportation Security Administration (TSA) background check. Completion of those
means the individual would then seek to obtain an unmanned aircraft operator certificate with a
small UAS rating.
Connection to the Researcher
I previously was enlisted Air Force and my career field was supposed to pick up the up
and coming unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Due to Air Force constraints way past our
management, that never materialized. However from there I knew what field I wanted to be in.
The UAV/ UAS sector has huge upsides that could be realized if implemented properly and
timely. The biggest benefactor of this segment in my mind is the environment and dangerous
inspections.

THE CLASSIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS 4

Currently a lot of the work is done with full-size aircraft and crews. If the environmental
agencies can get approval to use UAS I believe perhaps more can be done keep what we have
safe from further destruction. While bringing down the current costs and manning that can be
refocused elsewhere. The UAS is the next level of technology that NOAA could use much like
its robotic submersibles and the ocean.
NPRM Comment
I am writing this comment in response to the FAAs proposal to regulate commercial
UAS. My name is Joseph Cooper and Im a former Air Force pilot and have worked with
government UAVs for the last decade. Ive read the docket and agree with a lot of what you (the
FAA) have come up with in the interest of UAS categorization.
The only issue I have is the operational guideline stipulation that states, Small
unmanned aircraft may not operate over and persons not directly involved in the operation. Im
looking forward to starting a UAS beach company, whose main goal would be the over flight of
local beaches for pollution, erosion, vandalism, etc. The focus is opportunity for real-time
imaging and live monitoring during the tourist season so that the state can gather data on the
destruction caused during heavy traffic. This raises the issue with the operational guidelines,
being that during these flights there could be anywhere from 10 civilians to 3000 civilians during
tourist season enjoying the beach during the daylight hour stipulation.
All of our aircraft have failure precautions built in both mechanically and software
wise, thus any catastrophic event has a deviation plan. Being light aircraft in weight, and low
altitude due to height allowance, this creates a safety net of which I believe the FAA should
consider when reviewing the over flight conflicts with civilians below the flights. The flight

THE CLASSIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS 5

paths are not designed to follow human traffic, we have the vantage point of altitude and angle,
however there will be times that the two will cross and multiplying crowds magnify the scenario
exponentially quickly.

THE CLASSIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS 6

References
Regulations.gov. (n.d.). Retrieved April 9, 2015, from http://www.regulations.gov/#!
docketDetail;D=FAA-2015-0150