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TLIA3907B

Receive and store


stock
Learner Guide
Contents
What this Learner’s Guide is about ........................................ 1  
Planning your learning ........................................................... 2  
How you will be assessed ...................................................... 5  

Section 1............................................................................................. 7  
Receiving stock ...................................................................... 7  

Section 2........................................................................................... 18  
Storing stock ........................................................................ 18  

Section 3........................................................................................... 29  
Rotating and maintaining stock ............................................ 29  

Additional resources ....................................................................... 33  

Feedback on activities .................................................................... 35  


TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

What this Learner’s Guide is about

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  about  the  skills  and  knowledge  required  to  
receive  and  store  stock  within  an  enterprise.    It  covers  taking  delivery  
of  stock  that  has  been  ordered  and  delivered,  storing  the  stock,  and  
rotating  stock  in  accordance  with  workplace  procedures,  safety  
regulations  and  other  regulatory  or  legislative  requirements.  

The  Elements  of  Competency  from  the  unit  TLIA3907B  Receive  and  
store  stock  covered  in  this  Learner’s  Guide  are  listed  below.  

Take  delivery  of  the  stock  

Store  stock  

Rotate  and  maintain  stock  

Complete  documentation  

This  unit  of  competency  is  from  the  Transport  and  Logistics  Training  
Package  (TLI07).  

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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Planning your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
• you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  time,  
and/or  
• you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer  use  the  checklists  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  more  
relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  industry.  
This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  the  enterprise  who  can  
show  you  things,  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.    

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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Section 1: Receiving of stock

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. check  that  stock  that  is  received  matches  
that  ordered  and  delivered  in  accordance  
with  workplace  procedures?        
2. accurately  identify,  record  and  
communicate  any  variations  between  order  
and  delivery  documents  and  received  
stock?        
3. inspect  received  stock  for  damage,  quality,  
use-­‐by  dates,  breakages  or  discrepancies  
and  make  records  in  accordance  with  
workplace  policy  and  procedures?        

Section 2: Storing stock

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. move  stock  to  the  correct  storage  space  
without  damage  and  promptly?        
2. apply  workplace  security  requirements  for  
storage  of  stock?        
3. wear  appropriate  PPE  during  receival  and  
storage  operations??        
4. record  stock  levels  according  to  workplace  
procedures    
5. label  stock  levels  according  to  workplace  
procedures?        

Section 3: Rotating and maintaining stock

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. rotate  stock  according  to  workplace  
procedures  and  as  required?        
2. safely  move  stock  using  appropriate  
equipment  and  in  accordance  with  OHS  
requirements,  relevant  regulations  and  
workplace  procedures?        

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3. check  and  report  the  quality  of  stock  in  


storage?        
4. take  appropriate  action  where  quality  of  
stock  is  outside  specified  standards?        
5. complete  required  records  and  
documentation  in  accordance  with  
workplace  procedures?        

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How you will be assessed

Assessment  of  this  Unit  of  Competency  will  include  observation  of  real  
or  simulated  work  processes  using  workplace  procedures  and  
questioning  on  underpinning  knowledge  and  skills.  It  must  be  
demonstrated  in  an  actual  or  simulated  work  situation  under  
supervision.  

You  will  be  required  to:  


• show  that  you  can  receive  stock  and  make  required  checks  
according  to  workplace  procedures    
• show  that  you  can  store  stock,  maintain  stock  in  storage  
and  make  required  records  according  to  workplace  
procedures.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 5


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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

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ADELG1045 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
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Section 1

Receiving stock

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 7


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1045
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  


The  process  of  receiving  stock  in  your  workplace  including:  
− checking  stock  received  against  order  and  delivery  documents  
− identifying  any  variations  in  stock  received  
− taking  action  to  report  identified  variations  
− knowing  and  applying  workplace  procedures  
− working  safely  when  receiving  stock  

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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

How does your workplace receive stock?

How is stock received at your workplace?


Systems  for  maintaining  stock  are  important  to  make  sure  
that  work  is  not  held  up  or  delayed  while  essential  supplies  are  
being  ordered.    As  stock  is  received  in  your  workplace,  checks  
need  to  be  made  so  that  what  is  actually  paid  for  or  billed  is  
actually  received  and  is  in  good  condition.      
Other  considerations  include  making  sure  that  stock  does  not  
have  to  be  thrown  out  because  it  has  passed  its  use  by  date  or  
has  reached  the  point  where  it  is  no  longer  able  to  be  used.      
Foodstuffs,  film,  medicines  and  chemicals  are  examples  of  
stocks  that  have  to  be  used  by  a  certain  time.    Safety  is  also  
important,  as  some  supplies  cannot  be  stored  with  others  –  
imagine  storing  poisons  with  foodstuffs!      
Workplaces  have  systems  in  place  to  ensure  that  stock  is:  
• available  when  it  is  required  
• fit  for  use  
• managed  cost  effectively  and  wastage  is  kept  to  a  
minimum.  

Every  workplace  will  have  differences  in  how  stock  is  ordered,  received  
and  stored.    Your  first  task  will  be  to  become  familiar  with  the  stock  
receiving  area  and  understanding  how  stock  is  processed.    You  may  
have  worked  in  the  area  that  is  responsible  for  ordering  stock  or  even  
had  to  order  stock  yourself.    Understanding  the  ordering  system  will  
help  you  understand  what  is  required  in  the  receiving  area.  

Arrange,  either  as  part  of  your  induction  or  when  you  begin  to  work  in  
the  receiving  area,  to  be  given  a  tour  of  the  area.  

Speak  to  your  supervisor  or  trainer  and  ask  how  stock  is  ordered.    It  is  
important  to  be  able  to  see  the  process  of  receiving  stock  as  part  of  a  
bigger  picture  of  stock  control.      

As  part  of  your  investigation,  also  find  out  what  happens  to  the  stock  
before  it  is  placed  in  storage.    Later  in  this  unit,  you  will  be  looking  at  
maintaining  stock  in  the  storage  area.  
The  following  activities  ask  you  to  investigate  the  layout  of  the  
stock  storage  area  and  types  of  goods  received  in  your  
workplace.  

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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Activity 1: Receiving area for stock

In the space below, draw a sketch map of where stock is received.


If there is a floor plan of the building, you could use this and make
additional notes to show where stock is received.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Activity 2: An overview of stock control

When you have found out about how receiving stock fits into the big
picture of stock control, answer the following questions.
• what sort of stock is received at your workplace?
• how does the stock arrive (transport mode and company)?
• what documentation or records are attached to the stock?
• how is the particular stock item ordered?

Use the table on the following page to record this information for a
range of stock items. You might need some time to fill this out. Try
to get a variety of examples from different suppliers and collect this
information over a period of time.

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Records of stock received

Stock item Supplier How ordered How it arrives Documentation


attached to received
stock

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s Guide.

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What do you do when stock is received at your


workplace?

So  far,  you  have  looked  at  how  stock  arrives  at  your  workplace.    The  
next  step  to  look  at  is  what  you  do  with  the  stock  when  it  arrives.  

While  some  enterprises  have  moved  to  paperless  offices  and  


processes,  most  of  the  stock  arriving  at  your  workplace  will  have  a  set  
of  documents  attached  or  inside  the  stock  containers.    

The  types  of  documents  associated  with  receipt  of  stock  are:  
• order  (this  will  be  generated  at  your  workplace)  
• consignment  note  (this  will  detail  transport  details,  
quantities  sent,  identifiers  of  company  supplying,  etc)  
• packing  slip  (this  is  an  internal  document  advising  the  
packer  for  the  supplier  what  to  pack  and  may  not  always  
be  included  or  the  consignment  note  and  packaging  slip  
may  be  the  same  document)  
• invoice  (this  will  come  from  the  supplier  and  include  
transport  or  delivery  costs  and  quantities  and  types  of  
items  supplied).  

These  documents  might  be  found:  


• inside  the  stock  
• attached  to  the  stock  
• loose  with  the  stock  and  handed  over  by  the  deliverer  
• sent  separately  via  mail,  fax  or  email.  

It  is  critical  to  have  a  record  of  what  was  ordered,  what  was  supposed  
to  arrive  and  for  you  to  check  that  the  stock  actually  arrived.    Also,  the  
stock  must  be  checked  to  ensure  that  it  is  fit  for  use.      

For  example,  in  the  paper  industry,  a  roll  of  paper  that  will  have  plastic  
or  foil  laminated  onto  it,  may  arrive  without  any  protective  layer  as  the  
first  hundred  meters  will  be  wasted  in  setting  up  the  machine  and  
getting  it  running  correctly.    The  edge  may  be  trimmed  in  the  process.    
The  excess  acts  as  appropriate  packaging  for  the  roll  of  paper  and  is  
allowed  for.    If  the  outer  layer  is  marked,  this  will  not  matter  as  it  is  
trimmed  off  or  wasted.  

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In  many  workplaces,  the  deliverer  cannot  leave  until  the  receiver  


provides  a  signature  on  the  suppliers’  documentation.    In  most  
enterprises,  the  signing  of  this  document  indicates  that  the  goods  
arrived  as  listed  on  the  consignment  notice.    In  this  case,  it  should  not  
be  signed  unless  the  stock  has  been  checked.  

When  checking  stock,  the  stock  received  should  be  counted  and  
checked  to  see  that  quantities  match  that  listed  on  the  consignment  
note.    At  the  same  time,  the  stock  should  be  checked  for:  
• damage  that  means  stock  cannot  be  used  
• fitness  to  use  (spoiled,  soiled,  dinted,  cracked,  etc.)  
• use  by  date  (freshness,  viability,  etc.)  
• colour,  size  (stock  may  be  of  the  correct  number  but  
wrong  size,  colour,  etc.).  

Where  any  variations  or  problems  with  supplied  stock  are  identified,  
check  workplace  procedures  that  apply  to  this  situation.    Options  
include:  
• replacement  
• credit  
• disposal  and  credit  
• selling  off  as  ‘seconds’  
• repair  and  charging  to  supplier  
• return  to  supplier.  

In  most  cases,  a  phone  call  and  discussion  with  the  supplier  can  sort  
out  the  situation.    The  relationships  between  the  receiver  of  the  
goods,  the  deliverer  and  the  supplier  are  important.    Good  
relationships  built  up  over  time,  through  patience,  being  reasonable  
and  using  positive  communication  skills  (listening,  questioning,  not  
being  aggressive)  will  mean  that  when  a  problem  exists,  it  can  be  
sorted  out  more  easily.  

The  option  taken  when  there  is  a  problem  with  supply  of  ordered  
stock  will  depend  on  factors  such  as  the  value  of  stock,  urgency  of  
need  for  stock,  replacement  time,  whether  supplier  is  internal  or  
external.  

A  common  problem  with  stock  ordering  is  where  the  supplier  cannot  
deliver  the  quantity  required  and  places  a  ‘short  order’  –  in  other  
words,  if  500  items  are  required  and  only  250  can  be  supplied,  these  
will  be  delivered  and  the  remainder  of  the  order  delivered  as  and  when  

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it  becomes  available.    The  short  fall  in  the  stock  received  should  be  
noted  and  reported  according  to  workplace  procedures.  

The  following  activities  ask  you  to  investigate  problems  that  arise  in  
stock  receival  and  how  stock  is  received.  

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Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1045
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Activity 3: Problems/issues in receiving stock

Talk to other team members involved in receiving stock, your


supervisor or trainer. Discuss the most common problems
encountered in receipt of stock and what is or can be done to fix
these problems including required reporting.

Issue/problem Solution

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Activity 4: The ‘rules’ of the game

Talk to others in the workplace involved in receiving stock and


develop a list of ten major points that summarise what is required
when receiving stock in your workplace.
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Section 2

Storing stock

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ADELG1045 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section:  

Storage  of  stock  

Special  requirements  for  handling  and  storing  stock  

Documentation  and  records  involved  with  storing  stock  

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What’s involved in stock storage?

Where and how is stock stored?


In  Section  One  you  looked  at  the  processes  of  receiving  stock  and  
checking  what  you  received  against  orders  placed.    In  this  section  you  
will  look  at  storing  the  stock  safely  and  in  accordance  with  workplace  
procedures.    This  may  involve  storing  stock  that  has  special  
requirements  for  handling  and  storage  and  completing  records  and  
documentation.  

Once  the  stock  is  received  and  checked  against  what  was  ordered  and  
delivered,  the  stock  must  be  stored.    A  number  of  factors  will  have  
been  considered  in  designing  the  storage  area:  
• people  safety  when  storage  area  is  entered  
• available  space  
• shape  of  containers  or  stock  (drums,  on  pallets,  cartons,  
racks  or  shelves,  etc.)  
• maintenance  of  condition  of  stock  (protection  from  water,  
dirt,  sunlight,  physical  damage)  
• security  of  stock  
• cost  of  storage  equipment  (shelving,  racks,  trays,  other)  
• availability  of  mechanical  aids  for  moving  stock  (forklift,  
hand  trolleys,  carts,  etc.)  
• minimising  distance  and  number  of  times  that  stock  is  
moved  
• stock  rotation  to  ensure  older  stock  is  used  first  and  
before  use  by  date  
• whether  stock  is  itself  hazardous  (separation  of  some  
chemicals  from  other  chemicals  that  could  cause  ignition  
or  explosion;  radiation;  flammability  and  flash  point;  
biological  material  that  is  potentially  or  actually  harmful  to  
humans;  other  dangerous  goods  classifications)  
• other  issues  such  as  those  faced  where  living  material  is  
stored  or  where  refrigeration  is  required.  

When  storing  stock,  your  aim  should  be  to  complete  the  process  of  
storage  as  quickly  as  possible  and  in  a  safe  manner.    Associated  with  
this  task  is  the  need  for  accuracy  in  placing  stock  in  locations  that  
follow  the  stock  storage  system  and  accuracy  in  recording  what  you  
have  stored.  

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ADELG1045 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

In  the  following  activities,  you  re  asked  to  look  at  how  stock  is  stored  
in  your  workplace.  

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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Activity 5: Storage areas and types of storage

In the space below, draw a sketch map of where stock is stored. If


there is a floor plan of the building, you could use this and make
additional notes to show where stock is stored.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Activity 6: Storage areas and types of storage

Take some time to look at the storage areas used in your workplace. Try to work out why the stock is stored as it is. Do
a small survey of team members who use the storage area and see whether you can identify any improvements to the
system in place. Use the table below to record the results of your research. An example is provided for you. Try to find
6 examples of different storage methods used in your workplace.

Stock item How stored Why stored in that way Possible improvements

Camera film Fridge in manager’s Maintain film in peak condition; security; no other Can be a problem if manager is in a meeting
office space available and need film urgently. Move fridge to
reception.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s Guide.

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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

What’s involved in stock storage?


Safety  is  the  primary  concern  of  all  enterprises  and  applies  to  
stock  storage.    Safety  issues  are  relevant  to:  
• yourself  and  other  team  members  involved  in  stock  
storage  
• team  members  passing  through  the  storage  area  
• team  members  accessing  stock  from  storage.  
When  storing  stock,  you  will  use  Personal  Protective  
Equipment  (PPE)  to  ensure  that  you  do  not  injure  or  harm  
yourself  or  others.  
Regulations  apply  to  the  handling  of  a  range  of  hazardous  
substances.    Examples  include:  
• flammable  substances  
• radioactive  substances  
• biological  materials  
• heavy  objects  
• explosive  goods.  
Legislation  and  regulations  cover  the  handling  of  such  
substances  under  the  Australian  Dangerous  Goods  (ADG)  
Code.    Goods  covered  by  this  legislation  must  also  be  labelled  
appropriately  and  may  have  particular  storage  requirements.    
Check  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer  for  advice  on  whether  
stock  that  you  are  required  to  handle  and  store  comes  under  
this  Code  and  what  is  required  to  safely  handle  these  goods.      
Further  information  can  be  found  in  the  Learner’s  Guide  for  
unit  TDT  D27  98B  Prepare  for  transport  of  packaged  
dangerous  goods.    Some  categories  of  dangerous  goods  must  
be  segregated  from  other  stock.    Examples  include  foodstuffs  
and  corrosive  substances.    Dangerous  goods  should  be  
labelled  appropriately.  
The  next  activity  asks  you  to  investigate  special  handling  and  
storage  requirements  for  dangerous  goods.  

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ADELG1045 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Activity 7: Safety in storage

Talk to others in the workplace to identify any stock that has special requirements for handling and storage including labelling.
Find out what regulations and legislation determines these special requirements. Use the table below to list handling and
storage requirements for such goods.

Stock item Handling requirements Storage requirements Relevant regulations and


(including required PPE) legislation

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s Guide.

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Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1045
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

What records are kept?


Many  enterprises  have  a  computerised  system  for  recording  
stock  levels.    Paper-­‐based  systems  might  also  be  used  
although  these  are  being  replaced  in  many  enterprises.      
Regardless  of  how  the  system  is  designed,  the  system  will  
only  track  stock  if  the  information  on  stock  received  and  used  
or  despatched,  is  accurate  and  entered  in  a  timely  manner.  
Retail  environments  usually  allow  for  a  1%  ‘shrinkage’.    This  
allows  for  theft,  unreported  use  and  breakage  and  errors.    It  is  
possible  to  achieve  accuracy  close  to  or  at  100%,  provided:  
• the  system  being  used  is  accurate  and  not  able  to  be  
corrupted  (by  viruses,  unauthorised  entries,  etc)  
• all  users  enter  information  into  the  system  in  a  timely  and  
accurate  manner  
• all  users  are  trained  in  how  to  use  the  system  
• checks  are  made  to  ensure  system  is  accurate.  
In  the  next  activity,  you  are  asked  to  describe  the  system  used  
in  your  workplace.  

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ADELG1045 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Activity 8: Record keeping

Ask your supervisor or trainer to show you what records are


required to be kept, how these records are kept and how to operate
any computerised systems for record keeping of stored stock.

Make a list of the main points you have learnt about recording stock
in storage.
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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What labelling is required on stock in storage?

If  stock  is  placed  in  storage  without  a  label,  then  it  can  get  confused  
with  other  stock,  particularly  where  similar  looking  items  are  stored.    
Some  enterprises  use  bar  coding  and  a  hand  held  scanner  to  keep  
track  of  stock.    This  is  an  easy  way  to  do  a  stock  take  as  items  can  be  
scanned,  the  information  down  loaded  onto  a  computer  and  
compared  to  what  should  be  in  stock.    This  is  in  fact  done  in  
supermarkets.    Information  such  as  stock  approaching  use  by  dates  
can  also  be  identified  from  the  scanning  of  the  bar  code.  

Putting  items  into  containers  that  are  labelled  can  be  an  alternative  to  
marking  each  item  and  suits  small,  numerous  items  such  as  bolts,  
screws  and  nails  of  different  sizes.    This  system  is  used  in  hardware  
stores.  

Labelling  requirements  will  depend  on  factors  such  as:  


• size  of  individual  items  
• end  use  of  item  
• regulations  and  legislation  
• storage  systems  
• similarity  or  difference  of  items  (whether  items  can  be  
confused  with  each  other)  
• range  within  same  items  (sizes  and  colours  of  same  items).  

The  next  activity  asks  you  to  investigate  labelling  used  in  your  
workplace  to  identify  goods.  

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ADELG1045 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Activity 9: Labelling

Ask your supervisor or trainer to show you what how items are
labelled to keep a track of stock. Find a number of different items
that have different labelling requirements and record these in the
table below. Identify why this labelling method has been chosen
and comment on how suitable it is.

Stock item Labelling Suitability


requirements

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 27


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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Page 28 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1045 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Section 3

Rotating and maintaining stock

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 29


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1045
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Checking  stock  in  storage  for  quality,  use  by  date  and  fitness  for  use  

Rotating  stock  

Documentation  and  records  involved  with  maintaining  and  rotating  


stock.  

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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

How is stock maintained?

In  Section  Two  you  looked  at  the  processes  of  storing  stock  including  
safety  in  handling  and  storage.    In  this  section  you  will  look  at  checks  
to  be  made  on  stock  to  ensure  that  stock  is  readily  available  and  able  
to  be  used  from  the  storage  area.  

An  ideal  stock  storage  system  allows  for  stock  to  be:  


• always  easily  located  
• moved  around  as  little  as  possible  (not  ‘double-­‐handled’)  
• used  before  reaching  use  by  date  
• counted  easily  
• secure  
• safely  stored.  

Stock  does  not  move  by  itself.    So,  any  problems  with  stock  storage  
are  caused  by  human  intervention.    Often  this  will  be  someone  ‘just  
grabbing  something  quickly  because  it’s  needed  urgently!’    Therein  lies  
the  problem  –  human  error!  

One  of  your  tasks  as  a  learner  in  the  stock  control  area  may  be  to  ‘go  
and  tidy  up  the  shelves’.    This  can  be  a  tedious  job  but  does  get  you  
familiar  with  stock  identification  and  let’s  you  learn  more  about  how  
the  system  works  (or  doesn’t  work).  

At  other  times  you  will  be  asked  to  join  in  a  stocktake  that  may  involve  
a  number  of  your  fellow  team  members.    The  purpose  of  a  stocktake  is  
to  check  quantities  of  stock  and  the  quality  of  that  stock.    An  annual  
stocktake  is  done  for  Taxation  purposes  but  smaller  stocktakes  will  be  
undertaken  during  the  year,  often  on  a  section  of  the  storage  area.  

The  next  activity  focuses  on  stocktaking  procedures  in  your  workplace.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 31


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1045
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Activity 10: Stock taking

Ask to be involved in a stocktake or when stock is rotated. During


the process, find answers to the following questions:

Question Your response

How often is a stocktake


undertaken of all stock? Are other
smaller stocktakes made? When
and why?

How often is stock checked for use


by date and rotated to ensure older
stock is used first? If NEVER, how
is stock loss avoided from being out
of date?

How often is stock checked for


fitness for use and disposed of or
repaired, etc? If NEVER, how is
stock loss avoided from being unfit
for use?

What is required when


damaged/unfit for use/out of date
stock is identified?

Are there any special requirements


for handling stock when checking
stored stock?

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Additional
resources

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TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

References:  
• Workplace  Health  &  Safety  Handbook,  Occupational  Health  &  
Safety  Commission,  1992  

Video:  
• Manual  Handling  -­‐  Safetycare  Series  

Web  sites:  
•  Australian  Safety  and  Compensation  Council  
http://www.ascc.gov.au/  
• Workcover  Authority  of  NSW  
http://www.workcover.nsw.gov.au/  
• WorkSafe  Victoria  
http://www.workcover.vic.gov.au/wps/wcm/connect/WorkSafe  
• WorkCover  Queensland    
http://www.workcoverqld.com.au/  
• WorkCover  WA      
http://www.workcover.wa.gov.au/  
• WorkCover  Corporation  of  SA  
http://www.workcover.com/  
• ACT  WorkCover      
http://www.workcover.act.gov.au/  
• Workplace  Standards  Tasmania  
http://www.wst.tas.gov.au/  
• NT  WorkSafe  
http://www.worksafe.nt.gov.au/  

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ADELG1045 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Feedback on
activities
The responses provided in this section are suggested responses.
Because every workplace is different, your responses may vary
according to your specific workplace procedures, the equipment
available and the nature of the business.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 35


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1045
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Activity 1: Receiving area for stock

Check with your trainer, supervisor or fellow team members that


your drawing or map identifies the receiving area correctly and that
essential features are shown such as fire extinguishers, store for
PPE, other safety information, mechanical aids for moving stock,
computer station to record stock delivered.

Activity 2: Records of stock received

Check with your trainer, supervisor or fellow team members that


table is accurate.

Activity 3: Problems/issues in receiving stock

Check with your trainer, supervisor or fellow team members that


you have identified the most common problems and issues that
arise during the receipt of stock and that your solutions are
realistic.

Activity 4: ‘Rules’ of the game

Show your summary to your trainer, supervisor or fellow team


members and ask for feedback on the ten points that you have
made. Major points will reflect:
• safety issues
• documents and records that are required
• any special handling requirements
• procedures and processes for checking stock
• how information about stock is passed on to those requiring this
information
• what to do if variances are identified.

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ADELG1045 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Activity 5: Storage areas and types of storage

Check with your trainer, supervisor or fellow team members that


your drawing or map identifies the storage area correctly and that
essential features are shown such as fire extinguishers, store for
PPE, other safety information, mechanical aids for moving stock,
computer station to record stock movements, security
arrangements.

Activity 6: Storage areas and types of storage

Show your summary your trainer, supervisor or fellow team


members and ask for feedback on the six examples you have
listed. Your examples should:
• be accurate
• identify why stored in that way
• identify special storage and handling requirements
• include improvements that are realistic.

Activity 7: Safety in storage

Show your summary to your trainer, supervisor or fellow team


members and ask for feedback on the examples you have listed.
Your examples could include chemicals, live material, materials
that have a use by date or deteriorate in some way, radioactive
materials, explosive or flammable materials.

Activity 8: Record keeping

Show your summary to your trainer, supervisor or fellow team


members and ask for feedback on the points that you have made.
These could include:
• detail of records required
• how to use computer systems to record required information
• how to access records
• how to print off records
• security of records
• checks made on records to ensure accuracy and currency
• special records required to be kept under legislation or other
regulations.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 37


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1045
TLIA3907B Receive and store stock

Activity 9: Labelling

Show your list to your trainer, supervisor or fellow team members


and ask for feedback on the examples you have listed. Discuss
what you have written about suitability of labelling used in your
workplace.

Activity 10: Stocktaking

Show your summary to your trainer, supervisor or fellow team


members and ask for feedback on the answers you have provided.
Sometimes procedures for stock taking may not be written down.
In this case you may get some variety in your answers. The
answers you get may help your workplace to develop procedures in
this area.

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ADELG1045 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008