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Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

ETP401/EE0401

Assessment: Ways of Knowing Learners 2015,


Trimester 1, Burwood

Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

Contents page:
Table 1: Summary of Assessment Task and Criteria.
Table 2: Whole class results for assessment
Appendix 1: Foundation writing sequence outline (including lesson plans with learning intentions)
Appendix 2: Assessment strategy in full with support material
Appendix 3: 3 x student assessment work samples and associated feedback.
Appendix 4: Peer & Mentor feedback on proposed assessment design
Image 1: Laminated pictures from The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
Image 2: Class constructed The Very Hungry Caterpillar story map.
Image 3: The Very Hungry Caterpillar planning document.
Image 4: The Very Hungry Caterpillar writing sheet handouts.
Image 5: Student portfolio descriptions.
Image 6: Schools Literacy Assessment & Monitoring Schedule planner.
Image 7: Assessment support material (for focus group)
Image 8: Class constructed juicy word list.
Image 9: Class constructed 5 Star Writing anchor chart.

Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

Introduction:
Learning and Teaching Context
At the start of Term 1, Foundation students were tested on their ability to write and/or recall (by drawing)
an event from a stimulus (picture book Clever Max) during the English Online interview (diagnostic
assessment). In addition to this, students began developing their letter/sound relationships to construct
words and simple sentences based on their own experiences. From here, students quickly moved to simple
recount writing about what they did on the weekends in their journals. By the end of Term 1, Foundation
students completed a written All about me book based on language experiences; wrote from numerous
picture book stimuli including Meg and Mog and created their own illustrated storyboard to convey
sequencing. During reading various Meg and Mog stories, students have been introduced to the language
beginning, middle and end. Before beginning this sequence of lessons, students had only practised
sequencing events by orally retelling some of the Meg and Mog stories out aloud, but not in written form.
As a result, I asked my supervising teacher if I could run a series of lessons based on retell writing of The
Very Hungry Caterpillar highlighting the beginning, middle and end of the picture book. It was a formative
assessment task as I constantly monitored student learning and provided ongoing feedback for students to
improve on their writing for the next stage (i.e. after writing about the beginning, and middle) of the
story. The students prior knowledge and their Term 1 writing achievements briefly discussed above was
the key influence on my chosen assessment approach. It seemed logical that a written retell from a given
stimulus was the next step of the Foundation students learning. Appendix 1 shows in detail the sequence
of my 5 lessons and associated learning intentions. The assessment strategy will be discussed in further
detail later in this report as can be referred to in Appendix 2.
Assessment Design and Development:
Rationale
It is important for students to recognise that sentences are key units for expressing ideas. These ideas can
be used to tell a story or convey meaning. Students need to understand that texts are made up of words,
created by authors who tell stories and share experiences that may be similar to, or different from
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students own experiences (ACELT1575, ACARA, 2015). Students should be encouraged to share their
own experiences. Creating short texts is a great way to do this as it provides a platform for students to
explore, record and report ideas and events using familiar words and beginner writing techniques
(ACELY1651, ACARA, 2015). As they listen and produce brief spoken texts with familiar ideas and
information, they start to sequence the main events/ideas in their speech. This in turn, helps add depth to
their writing as they start to experiment with language to help them sequence a story within their writing.
For example, students start to use First I did this.., Then this happened, Later I did this etc. This
links in nicely with my learning intentions, in particular the one that states that students should be able to
construct and sequence simple sentences from a given stimulus. Refer to Appendix 2 for discussion
about choice of criteria in the rubric, as well as feedback strategies that I planned as part of this
assessment task. Table 1 below as well as Appendix 2 goes in to further detail about my assessment
strategy.
Table 1: Summary of Assessment Task and Criteria
Assessm
ent
Task
Assessme
nt Task
Title:
Retell
writing of
The Very
Hungry
Caterpillar
highlightin
g the
beginning
, middle
and end
of the

Type of Assessment

Links To Curriculum

Criteria

What kind of assessment is


it?
(When/ How will this
assessment be used in the
lesson sequence?)
E.g. formative, diagnostic,
summative; self/peer
assessment; informal

How will it be
assessed?
E.g. criteria,
rubric, marking
schema.

-Formative, progressive
assessment task.

How does it link to the


lesson sequence?
-Recognise that texts
are created by
authors who tell
stories and share
experiences that may
be similar or different
to students own
experiences
(ACELT1575)

- Assessment task will be


undertaken in lessons 2-4 on
my third week back at

- Identify some
features of texts
including events and

Feedback to
students

How will the


feedback to
students be
presented?
E.g. written, verbal,
mark, grade,
- Their retell
comments.
writing will be
-Students will be
moderated after
provided with
each stage (i.e.
regular feedback
after writing about from the teacher
the beginning,
after each stage of
middle and
writing in the form
end) and marked of informal
against at rubric
conversations
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picture
book.

placement (week 8 in school


term).
-Refer to red worded text in
Appendix 1 for a full
description of where each
assessment takes place
within the lesson sequence.
-Given the age of the
students, it wont be explicitly
announced to them that their
writing will be assessed.
-Once beginning, middle and
end pages are assembled,
students will make a front
cover for their book. The final
product will be the
summative assessment piece
to be displayed within their
student portfolio.
**However, for the
purposes of this report, I
will just be looking at the
formative assessment**

characters and retell


events from a text
(ACELT1578)

(refer to Appendix
2 for detailed
rubric).

- Retell familiar
literary texts through
performance, use of
illustrations and
images (ACELT1580)

**This assessment
piece will form
part of their
student portfolio.

- Recognise some
different types of
literary texts and
identify some
characteristic features
of literary texts, for
example beginnings
and endings of
traditional texts and
rhyme in poetry
(ACELT1785)

and/or student
conferencing.
-Teacher will also
observe students;
take notes of areas
of improvement for
students and will
follow them up at
each stage.
- Verbal peer
feedback will also
be conducted
during share time
after each stage of
writing in the form
of 3 stars and a
wish (see
explanation in
Appendix 1).

- Create short texts


to explore, record and
report ideas and
events using familiar
words and beginning
writing knowledge
(ACELY1651)

Implementation of Assessment Strategy:


Table 2 below shows the whole class assessment data that was gathered throughout my sequence of
lessons. This data has been obtained from the assessment rubric (refer to Appendix 2), notes taken from
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observations, the 5 star writing anchor chart (refer to Appendix 2, Image 9) and discussions with my
mentor teacher whilst moderating students writing.
Table 2: Whole class results for assessment

Lily

Darcy

Retell Writing Notes


-Able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text respectively.
-Majority of writing is sequenced correctly; mainly accurate spelling, some punctuation and related to
The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
- Can read back exactly what shes written.
-Is aware of sound/letter relationships when spelling.
-Used juicy word list to make her writing more descriptive.
- Had a go at sounding out unfamiliar words and these were legible even though not spelt correctly.
- Starting to experiment with language such as Then he made instead of just listing what the
caterpillar did.
**Teacher assisted group**
-Needed teacher assistance to construct simple sentences.
-Worked from modeled sentence starters on the mini-whiteboard.
-Able to articulate sequenced sentences from middle/end of the story.
-Strings of letters that indicate limited awareness of sound/letter relationships with no sequencing.
-Reading matches some of the writing.
-Able to draw images to reflect writing at each stage.
-Writing is neat (i.e. letters all the same size), legible, had finger spaces and basic punctuation.

Amelia

-Majority of writing is sequenced correctly; mainly accurate spelling, some punctuation and related to
The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
-Able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text respectively.
-Writes very slow and often looks to the teacher for guidance.
- Has a good knowledge of letter/sound relationships and this helps in her spelling.
-Often forgets to start a new sentence will a capital letter.
-For the most part her letters are formed correctly, however needs to practice n and h.

Chelsea

-Can read back exactly what shes written.


AWAY (family holiday)

Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

Angus

*Began in the teacher assisted writing group during the beginning writing stage of
Hungry Caterpillar.

The Very

-Moved off table and began writing with limited assistance from me.
- Able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text respectively.
-Was able to sequence events by himself from the middle-part 2 onwards.
-Had a go at sounding out unfamiliar words and these were legible even though not spelt correctly.
E.g./ wun (one) and joose (juicy).
- He started to incorporate and in his sentences to extend them.
-Can read back exactly what hes written.
-Has grown a tremendous amount in his writing and I can see his confidence growing.

Lali

Jack

-He continues to write words by sounding them out before checking them on wordlists around the
room.
-Writing is neat (i.e. letters all the same size), legible, had finger spaces and basic punctuation.
-Able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text respectively.
-Majority of writing is sequenced correctly; mainly accurate spelling, some punctuation and related to
The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
-Reads exactly what she has written.
-Is aware of sound/letter relationships when spelling.
-Used juicy word list to make her writing more descriptive.
- Starting to experiment with language such as Then he ate instead of just listing what the
caterpillar did.
- Confident, independent writer, although can get distracted easily.
-Proud writer, making sure correct spelling and punctuation is used, however this often slows her
down quite a bit in comparison with her peers.
**Teacher assisted group**
-Needed teacher assistance to construct simple sentences.
-Worked from modeled sentence starters on the mini-whiteboard.
-Able to articulate sequenced sentences from middle/end.
-Strings of letters that indicate limited awareness of sound/letter relationships with no sequencing.
-Reading matches most of the writing.
-Able to draw images to reflect writing at each stage.
-Lack of finger spaces in writing, and his letters can often be different sizes.
-Sometimes his writing is hard to read, although his writing neatness is improving.
-Is only writing very simple sentence structures.

Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

Marissa

Kai

-On the majority, is able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the
text respectively.
-Very slow at writing, easily distracted.
-Has limited letter/sound relationship knowledge but can recall and write a number of high frequency
words.
-Can read back exactly what shes written.
-Is always one of the last students to finish her writing.
-Confidently able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text
respectively.
-Majority of writing is sequenced correctly.
- Often reverses his S when writing.
- Often spells was, woz however this is common at their age.
-Mainly accurate spelling, some punctuation and related to The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
- Can read back exactly what hes written.
-Is aware of sound/letter relationships when spelling.
-Used juicy word list to make his writing more descriptive.
- Had a go at sounding out unfamiliar words and these were legible even though not spelt correctly.
-For the most part, his spelling is correct.
- Has come up with great vocabulary to describe fruit such as divine and scrumptious.
- Starting to experiment with language such as After that he wasnt instead of just listing what
the caterpillar did.
-Needs to work on his 5 star writing, in particular his writing neatness and finger spaces.

Ava

Mirabel

- Needs to slow down when he writes, often the first to finish but with quite a few mistakes. He is now
starting to self-correct his own work before coming to me to have it corrected.
-Confidently able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text
respectively.
-Majority of writing is sequenced correctly.
- Often reverses her L when writing.
- Needs to re-read her work as she often omits 2-3 words.
-Writing is neat, legible and for the most part there is correct spelling and punctuation.
-Starting to experiment with language such as So, he wasnt showing more in-depth sequencing.
-She is starting to incorporate juicy words within her writing.
-Confidently able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text
respectively.
-Majority of writing is sequenced correctly; mainly accurate spelling, punctuation and related to The
Very Hungry Caterpillar.
-Reads exactly what she has written.

Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

Isaac

-Has a sound understanding of sound/letter relationships when spelling/writing.


-Uses juicy word list to make her writing more descriptive. Is very descriptive in her work. E.g. a
very yummy, big slice of watermelon.
- Always has a go at sounding out unfamiliar words and these were legible even though not always
spelt correctly.
-Her writing style is developing as you can see how shes now started to write all her words strictly on
the line with ample finger spaces between.
-The size of her writing has also decreased making it look less cluttered.
-At the beginning she was putting full stops in mid sentence, but this is quickly being rectified.
-On the odd occasion she may include a capital letter within a word, particularly in the case of the
letter D.
-Confidently able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text
respectively.
-Majority of writing is sequenced correctly; mainly accurate spelling, punctuation and related to The
Very Hungry Caterpillar.
-Reads exactly what he has written.
-Has a sound understanding of sound/letter relationships when spelling/writing.
-Uses juicy word list to make his writing more descriptive. Is very descriptive in his work.
- Always has a go at sounding out unfamiliar words and these were legible even though not always
spelt correctly.
- Starting to experiment with language such as Then he made, After he ate, Later instead of just
listing what the caterpillar did.
-Can write multiple sequenced sentences with ease and always incorporates expressive language.

Harry

-*Began in the teacher assisted writing group during the beginning stage of the VHC.
-Moved off table and began writing with limited assistance from me.
-Able to articulate some sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text
respectively.
-Majority of writing is sequenced correctly; mainly accurate spelling and punctuation.
-On the most part he forms letters correctly.
-His writing is progressing from On Monday he ate this, On Tuesday he ate this to He ate through
one juicy leaf. Then he was a fat caterpillar. This shows that he is starting to use language in his
writing that demonstrates sequencing.

Maxim

**Teacher assisted group**


-Needed teacher assistance to construct simple sentences.
-Worked from modeled sentence starters on the mini-whiteboard.
-Able to articulate only 2 sequenced sentences from middle/end.

Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

-Strings of letters that indicate limited awareness of sound/letter relationships with very limited
sequencing.
-Reading matches some of the writing.
-Able to draw images to reflect writing at each stage.
- Often includes a capital R in the middle of his words.
- Neatness of his writing has improved.
Oliver
Vanessa

AWAY (family holiday)


-Confidently able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text
respectively.
-Majority of writing is sequenced correctly; limited spelling errors, punctuation and related to The
Very Hungry Caterpillar.
-Reads exactly what she has written.
-Has a sound understanding of sound/letter relationships when spelling/writing.
-Uses juicy word list to make her writing more descriptive.
- Always has a go at sounding out unfamiliar words and these were legible even though not always
spelt correctly.
-Can write multiple sequenced sentences with ease and always incorporates expressive language.
-Finishes writing quickly with limited errors.

Astrid

**Teacher assisted group**


-Needed teacher assistance to construct simple sentences.
-Worked from modeled sentence starters on the mini-whiteboard.

Eleanor

-Able to articulate only 2 sequenced sentences from middle/end.


-Strings of letters that indicate limited awareness of sound/letter relationships with very limited
sequencing.
-Reading matches some of the writing.
-Able to draw images to reflect writing at each stage.
- Neatness of his writing has improved.
-Confidently able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text
respectively.
-Almost all writing is sequenced correctly; limited spelling and punctuation errors.
-Reads exactly what she has written.
-Has an excellent understanding of sound/letter relationships when spelling/writing.
-Uses juicy word list and her own words to make her writing more descriptive.
- Always has a go at sounding out unfamiliar words and more often than not gets the spelling of them
correct.
- Has written 4-5 descriptive and well-constructed sentences per each section of the VHC.

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Gavriela

Jardin

-Can write multiple sequenced sentences with ease and always incorporates expressive language.
-Able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text respectively.
-Majority of writing is sequenced correctly; mainly accurate spelling, some punctuation and related to
The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
-Reads exactly what she has written.
-Is aware of sound/letter relationships when spelling during writing.
-Used juicy word list as well as her own words to make her writing more descriptive.
- Confident, independent writer, although is very slow.
**Teacher assisted group**
-Needed teacher assistance to construct simple sentences.
-Worked from modeled sentence starters on the mini-whiteboard.
-Able to articulate only 2-3 sequenced sentences from beginning/middle.
-Strings of letters that indicate limited awareness of sound/letter relationships with very limited
sequencing.
-Reading matches some of the writing.
-Able to draw images to reflect writing at each stage.
- Is currently working on neatness of writing and finger spaces.

Looking at Table 2, it is apparent that most students were successfully able to use conventional letters,
groups of letters and simple punctuation (i.e. full stops, capital letters) to communicate meaning in their
writing. There also seems to be a pattern, especially with the independent writers of them drawing on their
knowledge of letter/sound relationships to sound out unfamiliar or difficult words. All students successfully
worked through the planning phase of illustrating their own story maps to help prepare for writing. It
doesnt surprise me that those students who could write multiple sequenced sentences with ease are the
ones that are constantly reading and practicing their Oxford words each night. I am able to tell this, as I
would regularly check their readers. On the other hand, those that struggled to sequence events and/or
construct simple sentences are skipping nights when they should be reading and/or could be read to.
Other factors that may have influenced these results could have included the language experiences of the
student and subsequent ability to draw on knowledge of letter/sound relationships, as well as their level of
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beginner writing knowledge. From my informal conversations with the students, the majority of them
understood that most texts have a beginning, middle and end component. They were able to verbalise to
me that the beginning was the introduction to the story (e.g./ the white egg on the leaf that lay under the
moon one dark night), the middle usually involved a problem (e.g./ the caterpillar ate too much and now
had a stomachache) and the end was when the problem was resolved (e.g./ he ate one nice green leaf
and felt better).

In evaluating the whole class achievement, I would have to say that the majority of students were able to
successfully sequence simple sentences, highlighting the beginning, middle and end of the VHC. When
redirected to the central story map or their own illustrated one, all students could orally retell and
sequence at least 3-4 events. They were also able to construct simple retell sentences from a given
stimulus as opposed to writing a personal recount. Thus, the majority has ticked the boxes to meet the
learning outcomes for this sequence of lessons (refer to Appendix 1 for learning outcomes).

As a result of this evaluation, I would modify my teaching practice by giving the students time to role-play
the story in small-groups. By doing so, students are able to verbalise to one another how they recalled the
events within the text in their minds. Within their small groups, students can bounce sentence starters off
one another as well as descriptive words. Students within these small groups may be introduced to new or
interesting words they previously might not have been exposed to. This could also be a way of
encouraging student collaboration, engagement and build confidence for those reluctant learners.

Feedback on students assessment work samples and analysis


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Appendix 3 shows assessment work samples from 3 students, Eleanor, Angus and Maxim and some
feedback I gave to each student. In Eleanors writing sample of the VHC, she has an excellent
understanding of sound/letter relationships with limited spelling and punctuation errors. She is very
descriptive in her writing and is showing evidence of using language to sequence events. I had
encouraged her to continue writing using expressive language and perhaps try and introduce a few of her
own juicy words in her writing. Similarly, in Angus writing, it can be seen that he is beginning to extend
his beginner writing knowledge to sequence events. He began in the teacher-assisted group but shortly
moved off that table and only required limited assistance from me thereafter during the assessment. I am
impressed how he was able to sequence events by himself from the middle-part 2 onwards. He also had
a go at sounding out unfamiliar words and these were legible even though not spelt correctly e.g./ wun
(one) and joose (juicy). Towards the end of the assessment task you can see how he has started to
incorporate joining words in his sentences such as and to help extend them. In the case of Maxim, I was
helping him work on simple sentence structures and the beginning sounds of words. For the most part he
could successfully identify the beginning and end sounds of given words but needed help when composing
simple sentences. After modeling basic sentence structures, I had a new goal for him, which was to
improve his 5 star writing, in particular his neatness and size of his letters. I am happy to say that judging
by Appendix 3, I believe his handwriting has progressed and is much more legible. For further descriptions
of feedback that I provided to these 3 students, refer to Appendix 3 below.

Reflecting Critically and Stance on Assessment Practice:


Reflecting on assessment design and teaching:
What role did the assessment strategy play in your teaching and in the students learning?
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My assessment strategy - formative assessment or assessment for learning - was integrated throughout
the learning sequence and not just seen as an essential tag on at the end, as is the case in some
summative assessment pieces. I wanted to ensure that I was constantly monitoring student progress,
providing them with ongoing feedback and getting them to take control of their own learning, thinking
about how they can improve on their beginner writing techniques. Using this strategy, I was able to gauge
a students level of understanding about re-tell writing, seeing what the student did or didnt know, and
then providing them with feedback between each stage of writing to help them understand what it is that
they were ready to learn next. In terms of writing, when feedback focuses on a summative task, such as
the final draft submission of an essay, the feedback is not likely to change students performance because
there is no opportunity for students to re-think, or re-do their work. Feedback that is deferred until after
the task is completely finished is unlikely to affect student understanding, because the students mind is
now focused on a new topic. That is why I moderated each writing sample after each stage of writing of
the VHC, together with my mentor teacher. We not only moderated against a rubric, but also talked about
individual goals/areas of improvement that would move leaners forward in their writing.
What role did peer and Mentor feedback play in your assessment design?
Appendix 4 below shows brief anecdotal notes that I took during my AT 2 Part 1 assessment proposal when
my peers and supervising teacher gave me feedback. My peers thought my assessment strategy was well
thought out, age appropriate and well differentiated. In particular, they liked how my assessment
task/strategy was the next logical step in the learning for the Foundation students, and how it was building
on their prior knowledge of writing from a stimulus and sequencing events on an illustrated storyboard.
Due to the positive responses of my proposed assessment design from both my peers and supervising
teacher, there wasnt much tweaking in my assessment strategy that needed to be done.
How would you evaluate the quality of your assessment design?
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As alluded to above, I believe that my assessment task was really purposeful, engaging and age
appropriate. By providing ongoing informal feedback between writing stages, I was able to set individual
student goals and these were really taken onboard and there was evidence of positive progression in their
beginner writing techniques.
My teacher stance on assessment
Continuing from my stance from AT 1, I am of the belief that the main purpose of assessment is ultimately
to improve student outcomes, however the overriding purpose of assessment still tends to manifest to
create tensions. Thus, assessment is not always seen as positive, particularly from those whose work is
subjected to it (Harlen, 2010, p. 30). Learning, teaching and assessment go hand-in-hand and I personally
believe that a formative assessment approach should be more widely used in schools and on a much more
regular basis. For assessment to effectively scaffold student learning and inform teacher practice,
assessment needs to be ongoing, providing students with feedback that will move their learning forward.
Im not suggesting that summative assessment be removed altogether as there are certain instances
where this type of assessment is only possible. Im only trying to convey that, where possible, assessment
needs to progressive. The teacher needs to facilitate students to help them understand what it is that they
can work-on and subsequently progress towards, ready to learn next. After evaluating and reflecting on my
assessment design, I am of the belief that ongoing, formative assessment is paramount when it comes to
improving instruction and associated learning. In addition to this, I am a huge supporter of activating
students as owners of their own learning and as resources for one another. At any level, share-time is
paramount if students are to develop a sense of ownership about their work. It is an important time where
students provide each other with constructive feedback. In Churchill et al. 2011 (p. 204), Black & William
(1998) state that when feedback and assessment function optimally within the classroom, they play a
crucial role in student learning. After running this sequence of lessons and associated assessment, I
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couldnt agree more with this statement. Overall, I want to ensure that I promote assessment practices
that are progressive, constructive and where possible, personalised. I believe informal, ongoing feedback
is the best way to achieve this, especially in the younger years.

References:
Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority 2015, English: Foundation Year Level
Description, retrieved 9 June, < http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/english/curriculum/f-10?
layout=1#levelF>
Black, P & Wiliam, D 1998, 'Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards through Classroom Assessment', Phi
Delta Kappan, vol. 80, no. 2, pp. 139-44, 46-48.

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Churchill, R, Ferguson, P, Godinho, S, Johnson, NF, Keddie, A, Letts, W, Mackay, J, McGill, M, Mouss, J, Nagel,
MC, Nicholson, P, Vick, M 2011 Teaching: Making a Difference, John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd, Milton, Qld.
Harlen, W 2010, 'Chapter 2 What is quality teacher assessment?', in J Gardner, W Harlen, L Hayward, G
Stobart & M Montgomery (eds), Developing Teacher Assessment, Open University Press and McGraw-Hill
Education, Maidenhead, Berkshire.
Swaffield, S 2011, 'Getting to the heart of authentic Assessment for Learning', Assessment in Education:
Principles, Policy and Practice, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 433-49.

Appendix 1: Foundation WRITING SEQUENCE OUTLINE Retell writing of The Very


Hungry Caterpillar (VHC) Term 2

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Whole Class

Small Focus Group

Independent
Writing

Lesson 1:
Constructing a
storyboard of
the VHC

Aspect: illustrating their own story maps


Focus: Rehearing the story out loud & sequencing the story
using props
Approach: Shared and interactive
Approach: Shared
Approach: Independent
Activity: Display all the props (i.e. laminated
Activity: Invite children in the
Activity: Students to
pictures from the VHC) on a mini-whiteboard (refer focus group to practice orally
illustrate their own story
to image 1 below). Explain to the students that we
retelling what happened in the
maps using arrows between
will be reading the text first and then making a
VHC using the class constructed
pictures to show sequencing
story-map on the board using the props. Talk
storyboard to check for
of events. Encourage lots of
about how the story has 3 main parts, a beginning, understanding. Draw each stage
detail in their drawings.
middle and end. Divide the story map in this way.
(i.e. beginning, middle and end)
As you read through the second time, select
of the planning document
Allow for share time (~ 5
students to grab the props off the mini-white and
together (refer to image 3).
minutes)
put them in their respective places on the central
storyboard. Once the storyboard is complete,
students are then given a planning document
where they can illustrate their own story maps, to
guide their writing for the next lesson.

Lesson 2:
Retell writing
(Beginning)

Aspect: Composing
Focus: Retell writing
Approach: Modeled/shared
Activity: Refer to the central story map again and
invite students to practice telling the story to the
class. Highlight interesting words they use. Focus
on the starting sentence in the story and ask the
children to close their eyes and imagine this
happening. What happened next? Remind the
students how the story has 3 main parts, a
beginning, middle and end. Focus on the beginning
component and model the writing for this part with
contributions from the class. Rub this off, leaving
only the first sentence up on the board as a
sentence starter.
Come up with a list of helpful words on the miniwhiteboard that occurred in the beginning of the
story e.g. moon, leaf, sun, etc. Also display these
words on the story map in the right places where
possible.

and the components of a story (beginning)


Approach: Small focus group
Approach: Independent
Activity: Practice orally retelling Activity:
the beginning of the VHC as a
Make a quick list of juicy
group.
words (i.e. descriptive
Go through the helpful words on
words) that the independent
the mini-whiteboard. Model to
group can incorporate in
the group a sentence starter,
their writing. Encourage the
such as One night there was an
children to extend their
egg on a leaf. The students will
writing to write about the
then write what happened during juicy, red, apple, etc.
the beginning of the story using
Students will compose three
their illustrated planning
to four simple sentences
document to guide them with
about the beginning of the
assistance from the teacher.
VHC referring to either the
central story map or their
own illustrated one.
Allow for share time.

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Lesson 3:
Retell writing
(Middle part
1)

Lesson 4:
Retell writing
(Middle part
2)

Aspect: Composing

Focus: Retell writing and the components of a story (middle Part 1)

Approach: Shared and modelled


Activity: Similar to last lesson, use your central
story map to practice orally rehearsing the story.
Focus on the middle part today. Talk about how the
problem usually occurs during this part of a story.
Because the middle is so long, we will do it over 2
lessons. Other students might like to just mention
a few things he ate (i.e. focus group). Model
writing about the foods he ate from Monday
Friday. Save the junk food part for the Middle Part
2. Rub this off, leaving only sentence starters as
appropriate. Come up with a new list of juicy
words that students can use in their writing for
this part.
Aspect: Composing
Focus: Retell writing
Approach: Shared/ modelled
Activity: Use the story map again for oral
retelling. Today focus on the second part of the
middle. Focus on Saturday and the long sequence
of junk food he ate and how he has a
stomachache. Model this writing but remind
students that they can only use the first sentence
in their writing. Come up with a new list of juicy
words that students can use in their writing.

Approach: Shared
Activity: Practice orally retelling
the middle of the VHC as a
group. Provide students with
sentence starters on the miniwhiteboard, e.g. On Monday, he
ate. The students will write
about what he ate from Monday
Friday, referring to the
modeled writing on the miniwhiteboard and their own
illustrated story map with
teacher assistance.

Approach: Independent
Activity: Practice orally
retelling the middle of the
story in pairs at their tables
before writing.
Students will use their story
map and the new juicy
word list to write the first
part of the middle, stopping
at the end of Friday (5
oranges).
Allow for share time.

and the components of a story (middle Part 2)


Approach: Shared
Approach: Independent
Activity: The students will write
Activity: Practice orally
about the junk food he ate on
retelling the middle of the
Saturday and how he has a
story (part 2) in pairs at their
stomachache using the visual
tables before writing.
story map prompts to guide
Students will use their story
them. Perhaps help the group to
maps and the new juicy
choose 3 or 4 things they would
word list to write the second
specifically like to mention. Write part of the middle of the
these on the mini-whiteboard.
VHC.
Encourage lots of oral practice
Allow for share time.
before they begin.

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Lesson 5:
Retell writing
(End)

Aspect: Composing
Approach: Shared/modeled
Activity: Revisit the central story map. Talk
about how we will be writing about the end of
the VHC. Mention to the students that the end of
the story is usually when the problem is solved.
Do shared writing up of the board, then rub this
off, leaving useful words on the board/sentence
starters as appropriate. Come up with a new list
of juicy words that students can use in their
writing.

Focus: Retell writing and the


components of a story (middle
Part 2)
Approach: Shared
Activity: Practice orally retelling
the end of the VHC as a group.
Create a helpful list of words that
this group can use in their writing.
The students will then write about
what happened at the end of the
story using the visual story map
prompts to guide them with
assistance from the teacher.

Approach: Independent
Activity: Practice orally
retelling the end of the story
in pairs at their tables
before writing. Children will
write about the end of the
story and are encouraged to
use juicy words
throughout.

Learning intentions:
As a consequence of this lesson sequence, students should:
Use familiar words, phrases and images to retell a story.
Understand that most texts have a beginning, middle and end.
Show evidence in their writing of basic letter/sound relationships.
Use conventional letters, groups of letters and simple punctuation (i.e. full stops, capital letters) in their writing.
Be able to construct simple retell sentences from a stimulus (in this case from images within a book).
Sequence 3 or more events within the beginning, middle and end of the VHC in written form.

*Next lesson we will assemble our pages and make a front cover for our books. We will share the final product as a
class. Students will peer assess each others work by verbalising three things they liked and one thing they could
improve on (three stars and a wish).
*Finished written VHC retell stories will form part of students portfolios.
= Ongoing formative assessment, focused on as part of this assignment.
Due to the writing ability of the children I will be focusing on modeling simple sentences, such as:
-

The egg was on the leaf.


The caterpillar popped out.
He looked for food.
The caterpillar ate
He was sick so he ate a green leaf
He was a big fat caterpillar
He made a cocoon
He was a beautiful butterfly

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Appendix 1: Foundation WRITING SEQUENCE OUTLINE Retell writing of The Very


Hungry Caterpillar (VHC) Term 2
Image 1: Laminated pictures from the VHC story
storyboard

Image 2: Class constructed VHC

Image 3: VHC planning document students used to help prepare for writing.

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Appendix 2: Assessment task in full with support material


Assessment Task:
Writing retell of The Very Hungry Caterpillar.

When will the Assessment Task take place?


This assessment task will be undertaken in lessons 2-4 (refer to lesson sequence in Appendix 1) on my
third week back at placement (week 8 in school term).
What kind of assessment is it?
Assessment for learning
o Formative, progressive/ongoing assessment task.
o Collaborative approach (achieved through fish-bowling particularly with my focus group).
o This will help to engage student confidence.
Students dont necessarily need to know they are being assessed.
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This assessment approach is integrated into the learning and not just seen as an essential tag on at
the end

- I will be implementing these 5 strategies for AfL during my lessons:


1) Making learning intentions explicit to students at the beginning of each lesson.
2) Encouraging classroom discussion in the form of informal conversations that elicits evidence of
learning monitoring student progress and taking notes at each stage for individual student
improvement.
3) Providing feedback that moves learners forward at each stage of their writing informal assessment
feedback.
4) Activating students as resources for one another practice oral retelling their sentences to each
other before they write.
5) Activating students as owners of their own learning ensuring that there is share time at the end
of each lesson where students can provide peer feedback in the form of 3 stars and a wish.
(Swaffield, 2011).

Appendix 2: Assessment task in full with support material


How will the assessment strategy be carried out and assessed?
-Students are given a planning document of the VHC.
-Handout is divided into three parts: beginning, middle and end (refer back to Appendix 1, Image 3).
-After being read the story of The Very Hungry Caterpillar and sequencing the images from the book on the
board, as a class students practice orally retelling the sequence of events.
-To help prepare for writing the Preps will illustrate their own story maps (refer to Appendix 1, Image 3).
Using this planning document, they then will write over a number of days to complete the beginning,
middle and end components of the story.
-Students must write corresponding sentences to match the images displayed on the central storyboard
from the different aspects of the book (i.e. beginning, middle and end) on the given handouts (refer to
Image 4 below).
Image 4: VHC writing sheet handouts

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-After each stage, the students work will be collected and moderated against a rubric (see below within
this Appendix). The teacher will only see students rubrics.
- The teacher uses the rubric to make notes on each childs areas of strengths and areas needing
improvement.
- These notes will be used by the teacher to provide students with verbal, informal feedback on how they
can improve after each stage of retell writing of The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
**This assessment piece will form part of their student portfolio**.
How will it fit in with the bigger picture of the schools assessment culture?
During Foundation year the major assessment piece is the student portfolio. The portfolio contains
student-learning goals, samples of work and rich assessments (i.e. teacher-constructed) pieces relevant
to AusVELS.
The written retell of The Very Hungry Caterpillar is a rich assessment task that will make up part of the
Writing component of the Foundation Program Overview as outlined in the student portfolio (refer to
image 5).
Image 5: Student portfolio subject area descriptions.

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Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

This rich assessment task also fits in nicely within the schools literacy assessment and monitoring
schedule and will make up the rich assessment task that must be completed in week 8 of Term 2 (refer to
image 6 below).

Image 6: Schools Literacy Assessment and Monitoring Schedule

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Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

What teaching and learning approaches are you intending to use to support student learning?
Fish-bowling with students who need additional support. Modeling beginner writing behaviours. Give
students prompts such as days of the week names and associated images for them to write from (focus
group). Simplify sentences for them to read before rubbing them off. This can be seen in Image 7.

Image 7: Assessment support material for the focus group.


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Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

- Encourage students to rehearse their sentences out loud with a partner before they begin writing
(independent writing).
- Encourage students to elaborate on their sentences by using and as well as juicy words instead of just
writing simple sentences. Look for 3 or more descriptive sentences per beginning, middle and end section
that are correctly sequenced. Come up with a list of juicy words as a class that students can use to add
depth to their writing (extension group) as seen in
Image 8.
Image 8: Class constructed juicy word list.

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Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

Discussion about choice of rubric criteria and feedback strategies:


Given the age of the students I decided that the best way to provide feedback was to take notes of areas
needing improvement/areas of strengths when moderating and use these notes to have informal
conversations as a means of feedback. I have also stressed in my lesson plans the need for verbal peer
feedback in the form of 3 stars and a wish during share time. By doing so, I aim to activate students as
owners of their own learning. In terms of the rubric (described in detail below), Im not only assessing the
writing ability of the students, but also whether or not they can read back and articulate what they have
written to see if it makes sense. As mentioned in my rationale, speech and written language are closely
interconnected. Students need to be able to identify some letter/sound relationships if they are to have
writing that is recognisable.

ASSESSMENT TASK RUBIC


AusVELS Foundation
English (Writing)

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Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

Early Writing Piece: re-tell writing activity


At the beginning of the year the Prep students attended a Prep Entry Assessment to complete a range of
oral language tasks and other early literacy tasks. Students had to read a story called Clever Max and write
a written response to the story at school.
Similarly, for this task, students are required to recall and write events from a given stimulus. Students are
read The Very Hungry Caterpillar and begin by sequencing images from the book to form a simple story
map as a class. The story map is divided into three parts highlighting the beginning, middle and end of the
text. To help prepare for writing, students illustrate their own story-map to show sequencing of events. The
teacher models how to compose a few examples sentences from the story map. . Using this planning
document, they then wrote over a number of days to complete the beginning, middle and end components
of the story. The children were supported in their writing with some key words such as caterpillar and
cocoon.
This task requires students to complete a written re-tell of the VHC to construct simple sentences for each
beginning, middle and end component of the text, using their illustrated planning document as an aid.
Ability to articulate their sentence out loud before writing
o Able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning, middle and end of the text respectively.
o Able to articulate sequenced sentences from beginning/middle, or middle/end.
o Only articulates out loud before writing one sentence recalled from the book with no evidence of
being able to sequence.
Writing about the story
o Majority of writing is sequenced correctly; mainly accurate spelling, some punctuation and related to
The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
o 4 or more sentences with recognisable sequenced sentences with plausible spelling with some
relation to The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
o 2 or more sentences with recognisable sequenced sentences with plausible spelling and reference to
The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
o Strings of letters that indicate awareness of sound/letter relationships with no sequencing and limited
reference to The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
o Strings of random letters.
o Scribble writing
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Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

o Picture only.
Reading back the writing
o Can read back the writing.
o Tries but cannot read back the writing.
o No attempt to read back the writing.
The relationship between what the student reads and what they have actually written
o The child reads exactly what they have written.
o Reading matches some of the writing.
o Reading has no obvious correspondence to what is actually written.
Assessment support material:
1) Laminated pictures from the VHC story
(i.e. props) refer to Appendix 1, Image 1.
2) Class constructed VHC storyboard - refer to Appendix 1, Image 2.
3) Planning document (refer back to Appendix 1, Image 3)
4) VHC writing sheet handouts (see above Appendix 2, Image 4)
5) Assessment Rubric (used only by the teacher to assess students beginner writing knowledge) see
above, Appendix 2.
6) Class constructed 5 Star Writing anchor chart (see below Appendix 2, Image 9)

Image 9: 5 Star Writing anchor chart

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Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

Appendix 3: 3 x student assessment work samples and feedback


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Student 1: Eleanor

Appendix 3: 3 x student assessment work samples and feedback


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Feedback for Eleanor:

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Appendix 3: 3 x student assessment work samples


and feedback
Student 2: Angus

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Elizabeth Hondromatidis_212066134_ETP401_AT2 Part 2

Appendix 3: 3 x student assessment work samples and feedback


Feedback for Angus:

Appendix 3: 3 x
student assessment work samples and feedback
Student 3: Maxim

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Appendix 3: 3 x student assessment work


samples and feedback
Feedback for Maxim:

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Appendix 4: Peer & Mentor feedback on proposed


assessment design

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Peer feedback from AT 2 Part 1 proposal.


proposed assessment design.

Supervising teacher feedback on

38