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Proactive Behavior Management Plan

NOTE: Information
should be based on the students most current FBA
Section 1. Student Information
Student Name:

Jaslynn Campbell

Student Date of Birth:

12-16-2007

Grade Level:
Program Location/School:

01
ISD 194

Case Manager:

Elsa Dumke

Date Plan Written:

09-23-15

Section 2. Student Strengths and Preferences (Describe the students hobbies, interests,
positive attributes, etc.)
Jaslynn is strong willed and rather independent. She displays a strong desire for establishing
and maintaining friendships with her peers. One of the greatest attributes of Jaslynn is her
ability to think outside of the box. She is imaginative and creative in both play and instruction.
She is quick witted, and is often first to answer questions or initiate conversations.
According to Jaslynns FBA, Jaslynn appears to work best with minimal distractions, frequent
movement breaks, and flexibility surrounding movement within the classroom. She responds
well to 1:1 attention and direction from preferred staff and peers. Jaslynn strives within
familiar routines as they have clear expectations and rules.

Section 3. Contributing Factors (Identify any and all pertinent factors that may impact the
occurrence of challenging behaviors)
Jaslynn is diagnosed with the following disorders/deficits:
Autism Spectrum Disorder (Aspergers)
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
Disruptive Behavior
Depression and Anxiety
Sensory Processing Deficit
As illustrated in Jaslynns FBA, Jaslynns personal characteristics related to social skills
deficit, communication skill deficits, high activity levels, emotional regulation, and selfdetermination are noted to influence her behaviors.

Section 4. Global Goals (Identify goals for the student to attain with the use of this plan)

1.

Decrease occurrence of target behaviors (increase in prosocial replacement


behaviors)

2.

Improve social interactions with others (specifically with peers)

3.

Increase use of self-regulation techniques/strategies

Section 5. Target Behaviors (Identify and describe the targeted behavior(s), include frequency,
duration, and intensity of the behavior)
1.

Noncompliance
Jaslynn is noted to engage in verbal and/or nonverbal noncompliant behaviors (e.g.
verbally/nonverbally, yell, shout, cry, whine, physically act out, etc.). These
behaviors occur approximately 3-4 times per day and typically last anywhere
between 5-10 minutes. Due to the frequency of these behaviors, it is rated at mildmoderate in intensity.

2.

Verbal Disruption/Inappropriate Vocalizations


When frustrated, or upset Jaslynns verbal behavior (crying, yelling, name calling,
blurting, shouting, etc.) has been known to disrupt the learning environment and
safety of others, as well as herself. Jaslynn will verbally threaten the safety of others,
threatening to hurt them by biting, kicking, hitting, punching, etc. Jaslynn has also
made suicidal threats, stating that she will kill herself. These behaviors typically
occur 3-5 times per day, and due to their continuous nature, the start and end times
are hard to pin-point or determine. Again due to the continuous nature of this
behavior and its varying degrees in levels of severity, it may be rated anywhere from
mild to severe in intensity.

3.

Truancy
Jaslynn is noted to leave her environments or the presence of others without
requesting of having permission. Jaslynn can be described to be: out of place, leave
assigned area, wander the hall, enter other classrooms, etc. This occurs 1-3 times per
day and typically last for 5-15 minutes. Due to the safety risk this posse for Jaslynn
as well as the disruption it causes in her learning, this behavior is considered to be
moderate to severe in intensity.

*Note: Jaslynn is also noted to have displayed physical aggression towards staff; hitting, kicking,
biting, etc. However, noncompliance, verbal disruption, and truancy are most disruptive to

Jaslynns learning and occur prior to instanced of physical aggression. Physical aggression does
not typically occur unless staff block access to truant behaviors and is of low intensity.
Section 6. Preliminary Behaviors (Identify the suspected purpose of the targeted behavior(s))
There is likely an internal or automatic function to Jaslynns behaviors as she has self-reported
that she leaves the classroom because it is too overwhelming. Jaslynn also displays mental
health symptoms of impulsivity and inattentiveness as well as sensory processing needs that
may be met as she displays inappropriate behaviors.
Under many conditions, Jaslynns behaviors likely serve to gain her social attention,
assistance, or attempted affiliation with others as well as a tangible object or activity.
The last function likely served by displaying negative behaviors is a delay or escape of an
activity, location, situation, or person.
*Note: Jaslynns targeted behaviors are multi-functional, that is, they likely serve a variety of
functions dependent upon the specific setting events and antecedents.
Section 7. Replacement Behaviors (Identify the more appropriate behavior that should serve as
a replacement for the problem behavior(s))
Communication Skills
Staff will teach and prompt Jaslynn to more appropriately communicate her needs and wants
to others. Examples of this may include: asking versus not asking and doing, using appropriate
tone/volume when requesting, raising her hand versus blurting out, asking for assistance
versus leaving the room or becoming noncompliant, etc.
Social Skills
Jaslynn will be taught and prompted with more appropriate methods of gaining attention from
others and establishing and/or sustaining relationships with others.
Self-Regulation
Jaslynn will be taught and prompted to use various sensory tools and strategies to cope with
internal needs to regulate her body (e.g. fidgets, stand-up tables, gum, sensory breaks, hooki
stools, exercise balls, etc.)

Section 8. Data Collection (Describe how the target and replacement behaviors will be
collected and managed and who will be responsible for collection)

Data regarding presence and frequency of these behaviors will be monitored through hourly
classroom point sheets, progress on IEP related goals, and documentation regarding behavioral
incidents (Behavioral Incident Forms), as well as teacher, parents, and specialist observations.
The Educational Case Manager will be responsible for the collection and interpretation of this
data and input from other team members.

Section 9. Contributing Factors (List potential contributing factors that may contribute to the
challenging behaviors?
Time of day
Upon data review, there does not seem to be a more difficult time of day for Jaslynn. However,
the end of the day is a consistent time that Jaslynn will be noncompliant/verbally disruptive as
she recalls the days events.
Persons Involved
Jaslynn typically struggles most with the peers that she has the closest relationship with or
peers she desires to have a relationship with. She does well with peers she has little interest in
as she is able to avoid arguments and following those she does not find interest in. Jaslynn is
vulnerable in social situations with peers as she will frequently join or follow instructions
given to her by peers that are being inappropriate.
Physical Locations
Jaslynn does best in sensory or flex rooms within her classroom community, or in the group
room of the social work office. There does need seem to be a pattern of behavior within other
areas of the school.
Activities
Writing has been Jaslynns most difficult academic activity. She also struggles most when she
is not or does not feel included in social play with peers.

Section 10. Antecedents (List antecedents that lead to the targeted behavior(s))

Denial/Delay
When access to a desired item or activity is delayed or denied, Jaslynn will often display one
of each of her targeted behaviors
Instructions/Task Demands/Requests
When given an instruction for a non-preferred task or activity, Jaslynn will frequently become
noncompliant to the instruction. Non-preferred instructions/activities for Jaslynn include
academic tasks, abstract concepts, and activities that require sustained attention. Instructions
that are followed by noncompliance are not all academic in nature.
Lack of Structure
Unstructured environments are associated with a greater rate of noncompliance, truancy, and
verbal disruption for Jaslynn (i.e. social situations, transitions, choice time, etc.)
Lack of Active Engagement, Reduced Attention
If Jaslynn is not engaged in a preferred task (one she has immediate interest in) or when
staff/peers are providing social attention elsewhere, Jaslynn will become non-compliant and or
verbally disruptive.
Transitioning
When transitioning from preferred to non-preferred activities/locations or when simply
transitioning from place to place Jaslynn will often become truant and/or non-compliant for
various reasons (distracted, not wanting upcoming activity/location).
Presence of Close Proximity and Interactions of Others
There are a number of factors involved with this variable that may increase Jaslynns rate of
negative behaviors (increased distractions/noises within her environment, social miscues, the
presence or absence of preferred peers or staff members, etc.)
Routine/Schedule Change
Changes in routine or changes is what Jaslynn expects of a situation, day, or activity will
frequently precede instances of truancy/verbal disruption (e.g. If Jaslynn was told, maybe
later, in regards to a desired activity, she will become verbally disruptive at a later point in the
day if that activity had not occurred)
Consequent Induced Counter-behaviors
Jaslynn has more difficulty when her actions are corrected, redirected, blocked or punished
(i.e. she does not ear a desired activity or item)

Section 11. Replacement Behavior Strategies (Provide a brief description of how a specific
replacement behavior will be taught and who is responsible for implementing the intervention)

1.

Staff modeling appropriate behaviors, verbal check-ins with staff throughout the day,
and re-teaching communication skills to Jaslynn

2.

Verbal check ins with staff throughout the day, self-regulation tools (take a break card,
study carrel break out space, reading mat area for breaks, etc.)

3.

Social skills instructions with social worker and classroom staff (social stories, roleplay, etc.), repeated practice, and staff rewarding replacement behaviors of peers and
Jaslynn

Section 12. Reinforcement Strategies (Identify strategies to be used to increase the occurrence
of replacement behaviors)
Program wide implementation of level system with various privileges assigned by level,
distribution of program tickets, and golden tickets for use at school store.
The following reinforcement strategies will be implemented; engaging in preferred activities,
utilizing breaks, providing positive verbal feedback, and the opportunity to work with
preferred staff in preferred work space(s)
These positive reinforces should be awarded upon the display of appropriate behavior as well
as demonstration of replacement behaviors that will be prompted following antecedents that
lead to Jaslynns targeted behavior(s).

Section 13. Responding to Problem Behaviors (Identify and describe the procedures that will
be implemented when proactive strategies are not effective. These do not include the use of
restrictive procedures (restraint or seclusion))

Minimally Disruptive Behaviors


Minimally Disruptive Behaviors (e.g. subtle verbal disruption, noncompliance, truancy (i.e.
behaviors that are not continuously disruptive to peers within Jaslynns vicinity, or pose a
potential safety risk to herself or others (, staff will prompt a replacement behavior for Jaslynn
then begin to use planned ignoring, differential reinforcement, or pivoting techniques. Staff
may pivot to the other children with the area engaged in appropriate behaviors.
Differential Reinforcement
Attend to Jaslynn when engaged in appropriate or desired behaviors frequently. Refrain from
attending to inappropriate or less desired behaviors. Example; If whining, staff shall provide
Jaslynn with a verbal prompt to ask staff for assistance (i.e. giving an instruction on what to
do or what to say). Staff should avoid rationalizing, lecturing, and providing eye contact.
Note, staff should monitor Jaslynn without socially attending. Once Jaslynn beings the
requested task, staff will pivot back to her and provide attention, tickets, etc. for appropriate
behavior.
Professional Crisis Management Procedure
If (Professional Crisis Management) PCM transportation procedures are required due to
continuous high magnitude disruptions (i.e. Jaslynn is truant outside of the classroom and
noncompliant to staff directions, name calling to a present student, yelling, etc.) or continuous
physical aggression (which often occurs when staff block access to truant behaviors) staff will
transport Jaslynn out of the classroom and either into or within the hallway or another safe
location. Transportation procedures are faded following decreased resistance.
Once in a safe location, staff will present a simple receptive instruction for Jaslynn to complete
calmly and begin to use differential reinforcement/planned ignoring until Jaslynn completes
the required task/activity.
*Note: Providing a predictable, structured environment, utilizing visual schedules and visual
assists for wait, take a break, etc., sensory breaks, verbal praise, tangible rewards such as
preferred activities and staff attention are noted as effective strategies/tools to decrease
problem behaviors.

Section 14. Review Protocol (The plan will be reviewed/revised as seen appropriate or
necessary)
A. Date Reviewed:

Comments

B. Date Reviewed:
Comments

C. Date Reviewed:
Comments

D. Date Reviewed:
Comments

E. Date Reviewed:
Comments

Section 15. Providers/Staff Signatures (all individuals who are trained on this positive
behavior support plan)
Printed Name

Signature

Date Signed

Printed Name

Signature

Date Signed

Printed Name

Signature

Date Signed

Printed Name

Signature

Date Signed

Printed Name

Signature

Date Signed

Printed Name

Signature

Date Signed