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Physical Science Thematic Unit: Atoms

Crystal Allman
Spring 2015

Function Words Template 1.


Earth/Space Science Function Words
About

Above

Across

Beside

Betwee
n
Itself
Nothin
g
Several

By

In
None
Since
Towar
d

Under

Inside
On
Throug
h
Until

After

Aroun
d
Down Excep
t
Into
Like
Onto Out of

At
Each

That

Them

Little
Outsid
e
These

Up

Upon

With

All

Anothe Any
r
Either For
From

Both

Many
Over

Most
One

Much
Other

Near
Past

They

This

Those To

Withi
n

What

Whic
h

Few

Topic: What are Atoms?


Sub Questions:

What is an Atom?
What is matter?
How are atoms formed?
What is a proton?
What is an electron?
What is a neutron?
What is an isotope?
1

Students select from the word list to describe what they discovered about
__Atoms__. Having students look at the function words will help them
understand the language used in science.
a

Class Discussion:
i Did all of the groups come up with the same words or are there different
patterns?
ii What do these patterns reveal?
iii Record student responses.

Introduce a text about Atoms; include any new vocabulary students need to know
to understand what they are reading.

Discuss and choose the appropriate text structure.

Biography:

Aloian, Molly. (2009). Atoms and Molecules. New York; Crabtree Publishing Company.
This is a very good book for students in grades 3rd- 5th to look at when wanting to learn
about atoms and molecules. It has great images with captions throughout the book for
students to look at, and help them better understand.
Ardley, N. (1976). Atoms and energy. New York: Warwick Press.
This would be a great reference book for an elementary teacher to go off of, or it would
be a good book for high school students to read. It goes over every single detail about
atoms and has a lot of great, and helpful information, along with great images.
Cregan, E. (2007). Investigating the chemistry of atoms. Huntington Beach, CA: Teacher Created
Materials Pub.
This would be a wonderful book for students in grades 3rd-5th. It explains matter, and
atoms, it an easy way for students to understand. This book also has a glossary which is
helpful.
Dalton, C., & Sikora, T. (2001). Atoms. Vero Beach, Fla.: Rourke Pub.
This book would be excellent for students in grades 2nd-3rd. It breaks atoms into very
simple terms for students to understand. It also uses good examples to help younger
student understand atoms, like using baseballs or ice-cream.
Karpelenia, J. (2006). Atoms, molecules, and compounds. Logan, Iowa: Perfection Learning.
This book would be a great fit for students in 5th-6th grade. It is a short chapter book,
explain atoms molecules and compounds. It also talks about elements from the periodic
table. I also like that this book has a glossary!
Morgan, S. (2007). From Greek atoms to quarks: Discovering atoms. Chicago: Heinemann
Library.
This book would be good for students in grades 4th-6th. It go into detail about discovering
atoms, elements, and antimatter. It has little bubbles throughout the book with fun facts
about atoms and matter. It also has a glossary at the end, which I think it great!
Sussman, A. (2006). Dr. Art's guide to science: Connecting atoms, galaxies, and everything in
between. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
This would be a great reference book for a teacher, teaching a class about science. It
talks about more subjects ten just atoms, it talks about energy, life, and history of life on
earth. It is a large book that goes into a lot of detail, and has great examples that you can
use in your classroom.

Vocabulary: Atom, Matter, Proton, Electron, Neutron


Semantic Map Template 2
Description: This graphic organizer helps break down atoms for students. It helps explain that
protons, neutrons, and electrons are all parts of an atom. It also explains that protons have a
positive charge, neutrons are neutral, and electrons have a negative charge. This graphic
organizer also explains how a proton is part of an atom that is inside the nucleus, how a neutron

is part of an atom that has no charge, and last electrons are part of an atom that travels around its
nucleus.
Dalton, C., & Sikora, T. (2001). Atoms. Vero Beach, Fla.: Rourke Pub.
Positive
Charge

Part of an atom that travels around its nuc

Atoms
Protons

Electrons

Negative
Charge

Part of an atom that is inside the nucleus

Neutrons
Part of an atom that has no charge

Neutral Charge

Key description words: many, much


I would use this graphic organizer to help students see what the three different parts that help make up an
atom.

Sequence Graphic Organizer 3


Description: This graphic organizer explains how atoms can change from a solid into a
liquid and a liquid into a gas by heating the atoms. This happens because the heat
reduces the forces linking the atoms or molecules. If a solid is heated enough, the atoms
or molecules vibrate so much that the arrangement becomes loose and the solid melts to
liquid. Add more heat and finally break away from the arrangement and the liquid boils
and becomes a gas.

Ardley, N. (1976). Atoms and energy. New York: Warwick Press.

We can change a solid into a liquid, and a liquid into a gas by


heating atoms. The solid melts and the liquid boils.

The
came and
long, slow
motion.the
The
Thisearthquake
happens because
the was
heatareduces
thespongy
forces linking
earthquake
made the The
house
rock or
several
times.
atoms or molecules.
atoms
molecules
are always moving
even in the tight arrangement of a solid.

The hotter they get the more they vibrate. If a solid is heated
enough, the atoms or molecules vibrate so much that the
arrangement becomes loose and the solid melts to liquid.

Add more heat and finally break away from the arrangement and the
liquid boils and becomes a gas. In a gas, the atoms or molecules are
flying about in all directions.

Key Words: toward


This graphic organizer helps to show the students how atoms and molecules break down from a
solid, into a liquid, into a gas.

Compare and Contrast Graphic Organizer 4


Description: The following graphic organizer compares and contrasts Ionic Bonds and Covalent
Bonds. Ionic Bonds are when atoms give or take electrons to complete their outer shell, they
hold inorganic (not containing carbon) materials together, and rocks and crystals are formed
through ionic bonding. Covalent Bonds are when atoms share their outer electrons with outer
atoms to complete their valence shells, also electrons zoom around between the two atoms to
create the covalent bond, and covalent bonds generally hold organic (containing carbon)
materials together. Ionic and Cobalent bonds can be mixed together sometimes as well, with
Sodium Hydroxide.
Karpelenia, J. (2006). Atoms, molecules, and compounds. Logan, Iowa: Perfection Learning.
Sodium

Covalent Bond

Hydroxide

When atoms share their outer

Ionic Bond
When atoms give or take
electrons to complete their
outer shell.
Ionic bonds generally
hold inorganic (not
containing carbon)
materials together.
Rocks and crystals are
formed through ionic
bonding.

electrons with outer atoms to


complete their valence shells.

Electrons zoom around between


the two atoms to create the
covalent bond.

Covalent bond generally hold organic


(containing carbon) materials together.

Key words: Either, These


This Venn diagram helps show students the differences and similarities between Ionic and
Covalent Bonds.

Cause/Effect and Problem/Solution Template 5


Description: This diagram will help the students understand cause and effect. This diagram
shows what will happen if a proton, electron, or neutron is added or taken away. If a proton is
added, or taken away the element changes into another element. If an electron is added, or taken
away the element stays the same but its electric charge changes. If a neutron is added, or taken
away the element stay the same, but its weight changes.
Sussman, A. (2006). Dr. Art's guide to science: Connecting atoms, galaxies, and everything in
between. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Three Subatomic Particles
A proton is in the nucleus, it is big
and its electric charge is +1.

Effect of adding or removing the


proton is the element changes into
another element.

An electron is on the outer edges, it


is tiny and its electric charge is -1.

Effect of adding or removing the


electron is the element stays the
same, but its electric charge
changes.

A neutron is in the nucleus, it is big


and its electric charge is 0.

Effect of adding or removing the


neutron is the element stays the
same, but its weight changes.
Atom becomes more or less stable.

Key words: which


This diagram would be very useful to help students use cause and effect. They would simply list
down the cause of an event or something that happened, and then write the effects of that event.

Literature Evaluation Template 6


Use this template to evaluate literature you may use in your classroom.
Title: Atoms
Author: Dalton, C., & Sikora, T
Questions about the
Science Topic: _____________Atoms______________
literature
Yes
No
Comments
Is the literature age
X
This book is very age appropriate; it
appropriate?
would be a good book for 3rd-5th
graders.
What is the
X
2001, it is not outdated.
publication date? Is
the book outdated?
Is the Science
X
The material that is presented is very
material presented
accurate.
accurately?
Is the Science
X
Yes, it gives great factual information.
material presented
clearly?
Does the literature
X
Yes, it helps students better understand
add to the
the science of atoms.
understanding of
Science?
Will this literature
X
Yes, it has a lot of images that will have
promote interest in
students ask questions.
Science?
Is the literature
X
Yes
sensitive to your
minority students?
Is the literature
X
N/A
sensitive to your
low socioeconomic
students?
Is the minority or
X
N/A
low socioeconomic
student presented
negatively?
Does the literature
X
Yes, It prepares students for the
leave students ready
discussion of atoms.
to participate in the
science lesson?
Title: Atoms and Energy
Author: Ardley, N.
Questions about the Science Topic: _____________ Atoms________________

literature
Is the literature age
appropriate?

Yes
X

What is the
publication date? Is
the book outdated?

Is the Science
material presented
accurately?
Is the Science
material presented
clearly?
Does the literature
add to the
understanding of
Science?
Will this literature
promote interest in
Science?
Is the literature
sensitive to your
minority students?
Is the literature
sensitive to your
low socioeconomic
students?
Is the minority or
low socioeconomic
student presented
negatively?
Does the literature
leave students ready
to participate in the
science lesson?

No

Comments
I feel that this book would be a great
informational book for teachers to base
lessons off of.
1976- it is an older book, but it has so
much information about atoms and I
feel that atoms have not changed since
then, if anything just more information
has been released.
It has very accurate information.

Yes it is presented clearly. So much


factual information.

Yes it helps students understand


science.

The interesting facts will promote


interest in atoms.

Yes

N/A

N/A

Yes, it will get them excited to learn


more!

Title: Investigating the chemistry of atoms.


Author: Cregan, E.
Questions about the
literature

Science Topic: ____________ Atoms______________


Yes
No
Comments

Is the literature age


appropriate?
What is the
publication date? Is
the book outdated?
Is the Science
material presented
accurately?
Is the Science
material presented
clearly?
Does the literature
add to the
understanding of
Science?
Will this literature
promote interest in
Science?
Is the literature
sensitive to your
minority students?
Is the literature
sensitive to your
low socioeconomic
students?
Is the minority or
low socioeconomic
student presented
negatively?
Does the literature
leave students ready
to participate in the
science lesson?

X
X

This book would be a great way to


introduce atoms, it is geared to 2nd-4th
grade elementary students.
2009

It is presented accurately, in simple


terms for students.

Yes, it presents different examples


about atoms.

Yes it does.

Yes, it will make the students interested


in how atoms work.

Yes

N/A

N/A

Yes, it would be a great book to have


students read to prepare themselves for
atoms.

Title: Atoms and Molecules


Author: Aloian, Molly
Questions about the
literature
Is the literature age
appropriate?
What is the
publication date? Is
the book outdated?
Is the Science

Science Topic: ____________ Atoms______________


Yes
No
Comments
X
The literature from this book would be
great for 3rd-5th graders.
X
2009, this book is not outdated.
X

It is presented accurately, helping

material presented
accurately?
Is the Science
material presented
clearly?
Does the literature
add to the
understanding of
Science?
Will this literature
promote interest in
Science?
Is the literature
sensitive to your
minority students?
Is the literature
sensitive to your
low socioeconomic
students?
Is the minority or
low socioeconomic
student presented
negatively?
Does the literature
leave students ready
to participate in the
science lesson?

students better understand atoms.


X

Yes

Yes, it helps students understand about


how atoms work.

Yes, it presents facts to promote intrest.

Yes.

N/A

N/A

Yes, it will help prepare them to learn


more about atoms or do a project with
atoms.

Title: Atoms, molecules, and compounds.


Author: Karpelenia, J.
Questions about the Science Topic: ____________ Atoms______________
literature
Yes
No
Comments
Is the literature age
X
This is very age appropriate; it would
appropriate?
be best for grades 5th-6th.
What is the
X
2006, not outdated.
publication date? Is
the book outdated?
Is the Science
X
It presents atoms very well and presents
material presented
molecules and compounds as well.
accurately?
Is the Science
X
Yes, clearly stating how atoms work.
material presented
clearly?
Does the literature
X
Yes.
add to the

understanding of
Science?
Will this literature
promote interest in
Science?
Is the literature
sensitive to your
minority students?
Is the literature
sensitive to your
low socioeconomic
students?
Is the minority or
low socioeconomic
student presented
negatively?
Does the literature
leave students ready
to participate in the
science lesson?

Yes, students will want to try the


experiments it has in the book.

Yes

N/A

N/A

Yes, it would help the students get


excited.

Title: From Greek atoms to quarks: Discovering atoms


Author: Morgan, S.
Questions about the Science Topic: ____________ Atoms______________
literature
Yes
No
Comments
Is the literature age
X
This is very age appropriate; it is a a
appropriate?
good book for 4th-6th graders.
What is the
X
2007
publication date? Is
the book outdated?
Is the Science
X
It presents atoms very well and how
material presented
they work.
accurately?
Is the Science
X
Yes, clearly stating what atoms do.
material presented
clearly?
Does the literature
X
Yes, hearing stories and understanding
add to the
what takes place inside an atom.
understanding of
Science?
Will this literature
X
Yes, children wanting to do more with
promote interest in
atoms.
Science?
Is the literature
X
Yes
sensitive to your
minority students?

Is the literature
sensitive to your
low socioeconomic
students?
Is the minority or
low socioeconomic
student presented
negatively?
Does the literature
leave students ready
to participate in the
science lesson?

N/A

N/A

Yes, it would help the students get


excited.

Title: Dr. Art's guide to science: Connecting atoms, galaxies, and everything in between.
Author: Sussman, A.
Questions about the Science Topic: ____________ Atoms______________
literature
Yes
No
Comments
Is the literature age
X
This is very age appropriate, to use as a
appropriate?
teacher for a guide; it has lots of
pictures and examples for students.
What is the
X
2006, not outdated.
publication date? Is
the book outdated?
Is the Science
X
It presents atoms very well, along with
material presented
other things.
accurately?
Is the Science
X
Yes, clearly stating how atoms are
material presented
connected to a lot of different things
clearly?
here on earth.
Does the literature
X
Yes, seeing examples how atoms work.
add to the
understanding of
Science?
Will this literature
X
Yes, students will want to do the
promote interest in
experiments shown in the book.
Science?
Is the literature
X
Yes
sensitive to your
minority students?
Is the literature
X
N/A
sensitive to your
low socioeconomic
students?
Is the minority or
X
N/A
low socioeconomic

student presented
negatively?
Does the literature
leave students ready
to participate in the
science lesson?

Yes, they would love to hear more


about atoms!

Mapping Template 7
The template below shows the students the parts of anatomy of the elephant. It takes the concept
of the elephant anatomy and breaks it down in a very simple way for students to understand.
Eletrons

Neutrons

Protons
Negative charge

Positive charge

Vocabulary Template 8
Atom, Matter, Proton, Electron, Neutron
Use this template to help students internalize the meaning of vocabulary words.
Vocabulary Word:
Atom
Definition:
An atom is the smallest unit of matter that defines the chemical
elements. Every solid, liquid, gas, and plasma is made up of neutral
or ionized atoms. Atoms are very small: the size of atoms is measured
in picometerstrillionths (1012) of a meter.
In My Own Words:

An atom is the smallest amount of matter, that shows what an


chemical element is.

A Picture to Help Me
Remember:

http://arstechnica.com/science/2013/11/single-atom-catalyst-suggestswe-dont-understand-catalysis-that-well/

Vocabulary word

Matter

Definition

the substance or substances of which any physical


object consists or is composed:
the matter of which the earth is made

In my own words

Something that is taking up space.

A picture to help
me remember.

http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/scientists-discover-new-

strange-state-of-matter-in-chickens-eyes/

Vocabulary word

Proton

Definition

a stable subatomic particle occurring in all atomic


nuclei, with a positive electric charge equal in
magnitude to that of an electron, but of opposite sign.

In my own words

The positive charge in the atoms.

A picture to help me
remember

http://study.com/academy/lesson/what-is-a-subatomic-particledefinition-mass-quiz.html
Vocabulary word

Eletron

Definition

a stable subatomic particle with a charge of


negative electricity, found in all atoms and acting as
the primary carrier of electricity in solids.

In my own words

The negative charge in the atoms.

A picture to help me
remember

http://www.chem4kids.com/files/atom_electron.html
Vocabula
ry word

Neutron

Definitio
n

a subatomic particle of about the same mass as a proton but


without an electric charge, present in all atomic nuclei except
those of ordinary hydrogen.

In my
own
words

Neutron has no electric charge but is present in all atoms.

A picture
to help
me
rememb
er

https://reich-chemistry.wikispaces.com/James+Chadwick+
%E2%80%93+Existence+of+Neutrons

Concept Circles Template 9


The first concept circle is deductive reasoning; explaining what happens if you look inside of an
atom. You will see a nucleus, with protons, neutrons and electrons. The second circle is
inductive reasoning; explain what happened when people used radium. People would buy butter,
paint, and toothpaste with radium in it. This would cause a lot of people to get cancer and die.
Radium is the chemical element of atomic number 88, a rare radioactive metal of the alkaline
earth series. It was formerly used as a source of radiation for radiotherapy.
Cregan, E. (2007). Investigating the chemistry of atoms. Huntington Beach, CA: Teacher
Created Materials Pub.

Look inside an
atom.

You will see a


small, tightly
packed
center. This
is the
nucleus.

Tinier
Inside the
particles
nucleusare
inside
therethe
are
nucleus,
tinier
called
particles
protons
called and
protons

Last, you
will see
clouds or
particles,
these are
the

Concept or Word: ___________Atoms- Deductive reasoning___________________

Many
people who
used radium
died of
cancer.

People would
use radium
butter,
toothpaste,
paint.

Woman would
work in
factories
painting
airplane
instruments
Before
scientists
realized
the
dangers
of radium,
people
used it a

Radium Definition: the chemical element of atomic number 88, a rare radioactive metal of the
alkaline earth series.

Concept or Word: ________Radium -Inductive reasoning__________________


Key words: around
These two concept circles would be a great opportunity for students to use inductive and
deductive reasoning. Also it would give students a way to recall important information, or an
interesting fact.

Lesson Plan: Atoms


Teachers Name: Crystal Allman
Date: May 15th, 2015
Time: 10:00am

Location: Walnut Elementry

Temperature Outside: 80 degrees


Grade Level: 3rd Grade
IEP Students: none
What I know about the learners in my class: They have no prior information on Atoms.
Topic:
Why is this topic innovative?
Atoms are extremely small particles that make up the earth.. It is important to understand that
atoms are everywhere! Your pets, toys, house, car and even you are made up of atoms.
How assessable is this topic?
You can find information about this topic in many different places. You can find information
about it in books, movies, online, and many more.
How would you sell this topic to your administrator?
I would explain that atoms are everywhere, and everything is made up of atoms, so children need
to be educated on them.
What impact will this topic have on the student?

It could potentially have a huge impact or a small impact on the student. A student might be very
interested in atoms, and want to learn even more about them, or a student might not care about
atoms much.
Established Goal:
What is the big idea you unpacked?
I unpacked atoms and what are found in them, and what they are made of.
Objectives:
Describe what you expect students to achieve? Can it be measured?
I expect the students to achieve an understanding of atoms. I want them to understand the how
atoms are everywhere. I want students to know that if you look in an atom you would find a
nucleus, protons, neutrons and electrons.
Purpose/Intention:
What will students walk away with?
Students will walk away with knowledge about atoms.
How will this help students achieve an understanding of the topic?
Students will achieve an understanding of this topic from this unit and how if covers atoms.
How will this make the topic innovative to the student?
The student may not know a lot about atoms or they will misunderstand.
Tools/Materials
What tools will you use to meet your established goal?
I will use books, websites, videos, and news articles about atoms.
How will your tools help students achieve an understanding of the topic?
All of the resources I would use would be very educational and interesting to the students.
Assessment
What type of assessment will you be using? Summative or formative?
I will use summative assessment.
How does your assessment align with the purpose/intention?
The assessment will assess the students knowledge about atoms; see if they know what an atom
is made up of.
Rubric
List points needed (5 out of 5, 4 out of 5) to achieve success for the established goal.
Implementing the Lesson:
The Hook:

How will you catch your audiences attention (how can you make something such as
convection currents sound exciting?)
I will show a video about what makes up an atom.
Questioning:
What questions will be generated during or after the hook?
What is an atom? Where do you find atoms?
Will all your questions be open ended? Do not use yes/no questions.
Yes, I will use yes or no questions.
I will allow students to formulate their own small groups to discuss questions.
I will challenge students with a question.
Experiment:
Working as a facilitator, I will allow students to conduct an experiment to test their
questions.
I will communicate with students during the experiment.
Modeling:
What will you use to have the students show some performance or product they did
during the experiment (white boards, small chalk boards, poster boards)
I will have them make tables on poster boards displaying the experiment results.
I will have students perform gallery walks observing what other groups modeled (on their
white boards, small chalk boards, poster boards).
Assessment:
Template integration: What will you use from the JUMP DRIVE to assess student
understanding of the established goal?
Teacher should provide 2 of the 20 choices from the JUMP DRIVE so that students have
choice.
Reflection:
I will explore new discoveries made during and after the experiment. I will not grade
reflections for anything besides ideas.