Anda di halaman 1dari 23

EDFD462 Assessment 1: Integrated Unit Of Work

Situational Analysis
Park Lane Primary School is a State school located in Concord West aiming to achieve educational excellence in a collaborative and authentic learning environment. Park Lane Primary
School caters for a vast range of learners from Kindergarten through to Year 6.
Our school environment celebrates and respects people from all cultural backgrounds through a welcoming school community. As a result we provide a supportive, positive, quality learning
environment and develop standards of behaviour so that all members of the school community can live and work together effectively to maximise learning. This is achieved through adopting
various programs to support all students based on their strengths and abilities.
The school encourages a high level of involvement from parents in many significant ways in the life of the school. Together, we are committed to achieving a place of learning and excellence,
a place where all students feel safe and have a strong sense of belonging.
Recent infrastructure has resulted In a need to expand our school, currently the school is expanding to support the new influx of students commencing in the new year. Consequently, there
has been significant buzz as our school community comes together to restructure our school and expand the number of classrooms.

The following Unit of Work is aimed at a Stage 2, Year 4 class consisting of 28 students (12 boys and 16 girls) all from a vast range of multicultural backgrounds. Each student is caring and
supportive even in the most challenging circumstances, which allows them to continually develop their emotional maturity.
Each students strengths are extended and support the learning of others within the classroom. Technology is made accessible to all students through a range of technologies such as iPads,
tablets, Chromebooks, laptops as well as an Interactive Whiteboard.
The class consists of a varied range of abilities those of whom have been deemed Gifted and Talented are currently undertaking various programs in order to provide opportunities to be
extended. These include the Maths Olympiad for excelling mathematics students, The Da Vinci Project to support creative students and Museum in Box for the scientific students . One
student has been identified as an EAL/D learner and currently receives support both in and out of the classroom funded by the government. All learners fall under varied learning styles that
are explained in Howard Gardner's Multiple Intelligences theory, therefore differentiation ensures learning for all students focusing on their strengths and assists their challenges in the
different ways they learn. Additionally, through the support of Blooms Taxonomy, all students are extended to reach their full potential regardless of where they may currently be at, as they
move from lower order thinking to higher orders of thinking.
The impact of these factors on the learning in the class include the need for interactive learning activities in order to cater for the diverse range of needs. The teacher will deliver learning in a
range of ways in order to attend to the different learning styles in the classroom e.g. visual, spatial, mathematical and logical learners. As a result of each student's virtual backpack the
classroom will be a place where the school, family and community work alongside one another to form a strong partnership with all stakeholders.

Unit Overview

Page 1 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

Collaborative Classroom Constructions


Stage: 2

Year: 4

Time: Term 3

KLAS: Mathematics, Science and Technology, Creative Arts

Description, Theme and Focus: This unit has been designed based on the current social population changes occurring within the suburb. This is due to recent property developments in the area. The school, therefore
needs to undergo classroom expansion in order to accommodate the influx of new students commencing in Term One, 2016. As a result, Stage Two and Three have been asked to share their creative vision for the new
classrooms, given that it is these stages that will be undergoing changes. This integrated unit of work combines the Key Learning Areas of Mathematics, Science and Technology and Visual Arts to make this vision a
reality and to enable students to become involved in the process.
Key outcomes and indicators
Science and Technology:
ST2-14BE: Describes how people interact within built environments and the factors considered in their design and construction.
Mathematics:
MA2-14MG: Makes, compares, sketches and names three-dimensional objects, including prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones and spheres, and describes their features
Creative Arts: Visual Arts:
VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or beautiful* by choosing among aspects of subject matter.
ICT/IST: Students will be provided with ample opportunities to engage with and extend themselves through the use of technology. Its use will adopt a balanced approach where it will be used to enhance the learning
experiences of students. Across the unit of work there will be opportunities to engage with technology to further explore and build understandings about built environments. Such activities will include classroom
architect an online classroom planning resource as well as research with the use of Ipads, laptops and the interactive whiteboard.
Assessment: Throughout the course of this integrated unit Ss will be preparing to collaboratively design their own future classroom. The purpose of this is to determine the student's ability to apply the understandings
which they will gain across the 10 weeks, this task has elements of the real world within it as the winning classroom design will be built. Throughout the unit there will also be diagnostic assessment, this will take place in
lesson 1 to determine where students are at. Ongoing assessment as learning will take place in lessons 2-7. This may take the form of observations, participation, engagement, contributions to the blog throughout the 7
weeks. Ss will show their learning across the unit of work in their project exercise books which will be collected by the teacher to assess students learning.
WEEK

FOCUS

Introducing built environments-Ss will be introduced to the ultimate goal of this unit with an entry to design their own future classroom, engage in cooperative tasks, elicit prior knowledge and consider their
current classroom (aesthetics/feelings). Ss will be introduced to the class project blog, where Ss will discuss and reflect on their understandings. Additionally, Ss will begin to investigate the objects found
within the classroom and structure used to serve a specific purpose. Parents will be invited into the classroom, to engage and support Ss altering the dynamics, atmosphere and feelings within the classroom.

Investigating our current classroom- Ss will continue to investigate various environments in the school considering their purpose, nature and the way in which people interact in them. Ss will begin to consider
the mathematical shapes in these environments. Ss will use classroom architect to construct an initial plan of their future classroom and will be encouraged to add to the class project blog.

What shapes are our classroom made of?- Ss will begin to move beyond the aesthetics of objects in the classroom to consider the three- dimensional shapes which they are made up of. Ss will investigate
objects representing a cube, pyramid, cylinder and cone with drawings. Based on these understandings Ss will investigate the reason behind the choices in these three dimensional shapes. (Eg- Why use a cube
for an ottoman and not a triangular pyramid?). Ss will be encouraged to add to the class learning blog.

Our classroom, Their classroom- Ss will research and make comparisons about the aesthetics, interactions and ability to meet the needs of users for classrooms in other countries (Sweden, Philippines etc) and
their own. Ss will investigate the shapes evident considering the two dimensional shapes. Based on this Ss will create an artwork highlighting an element they would like to see incorporated into their future
classroom. After these considerations Ss will be encouraged to revisit their initial classroom design on classroom architect and make changes, Ss will be asked to provide reasoning for these changes. Ss will
be encouraged to add to the class project blog.

Our future classroom- Ss will predict, collect, compare, interpret and evaluate data highlighting the key features they will be including within their own classroom design. Ss will research various articles which
highlight important elements within classrooms and their structure. Ss will achieve this collectively as a class creating their own survey, surveying one another and then moving to survey the other stage 2

Page 2 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

classes. Ss will be encouraged to add to the class project blog.

Refining and Interpreting our results- Ss will discuss the survey results and consider what some issues with the collection of data may be. Ss will refine their survey questions to survey the parents who came
into the classroom in week 1, to consider the ease of movement and locating items in the classroom. Ss will graph these results appropriately. Based on these findings Ss will be asked to consider how the
classroom could be changed to best accommodate these findings. Ss will need to demonstrate this through a detailed drawing. Ss will be encouraged to add to the class learning blog.
The dream classroom- Ss will spend time looking at a series of graphs and interpreting these, Ss will as a class take this information to construct a 3 dimensional graph and then use this to inform their own
design. Ss will work towards creating a painting of their dream classroom, using art techniques to exaggerate features they see as being crucial. Ss will be encouraged to add to the class project blog.

Collaboratively constructing classrooms: Part 1- Ss will use the understandings gained across weeks 1-7 to inform their own final classroom design submission. Ss will spend time planning and preparing within
collaborative groups of 4 to showcase their design.

Collaboratively constructing classrooms: Part 2- Ss will continue to work in their groups moving to finish their classroom design. Ss will be able to choose how this will be shown as a mathematical floorplan,
as a sculpture, painting, computer constructed diagram, detailed drawing etc. Ss will individually be required to discuss the elements of their classroom format, noting their design choices and their purpose.

10

Our Future Classroom- Ss will create a short presentation, pitching their design to the class, their teacher, a selected parent representative and a school executive member. Ss will also reflect on what has been
learnt, evaluate the unit and provide constructive feedback. Ss will anonymously vote for their favourite pitch, these will be put in a jar where the T will determine the most preferred pitch. Ss will be
encouraged to add a final contribution to the class project blog.

TWO WEEK TEACHING SEQUENCE: Weeks 1 & 2

Page 3 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

Lesson No. &


Title

Indicators
of
Learning

Timing

1.1
1.2
1.3

Assessment Strategies

Key: (LM) Logical-Mathematical (SV) Spatial & Visual (L) Linguistic (BK) Body Kinesthetic (M)
Musical (IE) Interpersonal (IA) Intrapersonal (N) Naturalistic

(See
Appendix
1)

Teaching and Learning Experiences

Organisation
(See further elaboration in
Appendix 3)

Differentiation Groupings: Modified: ESL & Below Grade level Extension: Above Grade level G&T

2
Hours

Investigating
3D shapes

T will introduce Unit of Work to Ss through a Newspaper article where Ss will discover what their final
task/project will be (designing their own future classroom).
T ask Ss to walk around the classroom and observe the shapes within their learning environment e.g.
sphere bean bag, cube ottoman etc.
T will engage Ss in a discussion to elicit understandings of 3 dimensional shapes as well as built
environments.
Ss will use paint to create a landscape evoking the emotions felt as they moved around their learning space
(Was it warming, comforting etc).
Ss write one paragraph identifying and justifying the colours and images depicted in their painting as to
how it makes them feel
T will introduce the class project blog to Ss.

Assessment for learning:


(Diagnostic)- T will elicit
existing understandings
through an in depth class
discussion.
Formative: S individual
contributions to the project
blog will inform changes to be
made based on S interests and
understandings.

Blooms Taxonomy: Knowledge and Remembering.


Multiple Intelligences: SV, L, BK, IE.
Differentiation: Modified- Ss will be expected to include a limited number of artistic techniques (2) with
their painting. Extension- Ss will be encouraged to bring a range of artistic techniques (3/4) together within
their artwork, to depict their classroom.

2
Why does
our
classroom
look this
way?

1.1
1.2
1.5

1 Hour
40 mins

Ss will be grouped according to their preferred learning styles and asked to move around various stage 2/3
classrooms to consider the ways in which various classroom designs meet the needs of their users. E.g.
accessibility to resources, seating structure, arts area, place of the IWB/ ICT.
Ss discuss and synthesise their findings firstly in small groups and then progressing to the class, with
questions providing scaffolding on the IWB.
Ss record responses in a format which represents their learning style, in their project exercise books.
Blooms Taxonomy: Analyse
Multiple Intelligences: SV, L, BK, IE
Differentiation: Modified: Ss can use the questions written on the IWB as a guide. They may also be asked
to focus on in depth a particular aspect/element of the questions. Extension Ss can form three of their own
questions to review.

Page 4 of 23

Resources/

Assessment as learning:
Observation: T will observe
Ss appropriate participation in
discussions.
Formative: S individual
contributions to the project
blog will inform changes to be
made based on S interests and
understandings.
Project
exercise book will also be
monitored. T will review S
contribution to the blog.

Newspap
er Article (Appendix 2)

acrylic
paint

brushes

water

newspap
er

Compute
rs

paint
smocks

pencils

project
exercise book

classroo
ms to visit

IWB

project
exercise books

pencils/p
ens/textas

Probe
questions:
What is
important to 4B?
How
would you improve the
classroom design to
better suit your needs?
Predict
what putting 1 very big
round table in the

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

middle of the classroom


would mean?

3
3D Shapes
All Around
Us.

1.1
1.2
1.4
1.5

1 Hour
40 mins

T discusses with Ss the feature of three-dimensional objects and what makes them a 3D
shape. E.g. what makes a prism, pyramid, cylinder, cone and sphere, and describes their features

Ss will explore and identify three-dimensional shapes around the classroom. Ss will
compare these shapes by sketching and naming the 3D shapes represented in classroom objects.

Various parents will be invited to engage and explore with Ss. Parents will assist Ss
with taking photographs and engaging in a conversation of what shapes are present in the space.
(This experience for parents will be further explored during week 6 see overview)

Ss can use Ipads to photograph the shapes they find.

Ss will discuss the different types of shapes and objects that were found within the
classroom within the class project blog.
Blooms Taxonomy: Applying

Assessment as learning:
Observation: T will observe S
interactions with parents and
within the group.T will also
observe Ss discussion
participation.

Formative: T will review S


contribution to the blog.

Display
images of 3D shapes on
IWB.

HB
pencil for sketching.

class
Ipads

Physical
examples of the 3D
shapes.

computer
s

Multiple Intelligences: LM, SV, L, BK, IA


Differentiation: Modified- Ss requiring extra support will be paired with a parent. Parents will be given a
series of starting points in order to assist EAL/D Ss to stay on track. Extension-Ss encouraged to explore
3D shapes outside the classroom as well as research and further explore the three-dimensional shapes
which they have not yet learnt about.

4
Shape Hunt

1.1
1.2
2.1
2.2
2.4
2.6

Page 5 of 23

1 Hour

Ss will get into groups of 4 where they will engage in a scavenger hunt around the
school

T will give each group a name of a particular 3D shape which Ss will need to represent.

Once Ss have completed their representation they will conduct a scavenger hunt to
locate real-life representations of their particular shape.

Interacting in different spaces - allocate each group of students a place within the
school e.g classroom, canteen, hall, assembly area

T will distribute 3D shape cards which Ss may use as hints to guide them.

Ss will be encouraged to document there gained understandings within the class project
blog.

Assessment as learning:
Observation: T will observe
mathematical working of Ss
and ability to use mathematical
terminology.
Formative: T will collect and
analyse the representation of
3D shapes. T will observe
matching of shapes and will

hint
cards

computer
s

Question
s to guide Ss visit to
various spaces
how does that space change?
what things do you see
differently?

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

take photos of each S matching


shapes. T will also review S
contribution to the blog.

Blooms Taxonomy: Analysing


Multiple Intelligences: SV, BK, LM, IE, N

Work samples: Photographs


of matching shapes.

Differentiation: Modified- Ss will receive 2 cards to complete task on . Extension- Ss draw a visual
representation of how the shapes in a space of their choice create the space.

5
Classrooms
Around the
World.

1.1
1.2
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.7

1 Hour
40 mins

T provides Ss with a variety of photographs of different classrooms around the world,


Ss pick their favourite photo of a classroom, within the photograph and identify the 3D shapes, name
classroom features and consider what purpose they serve. Record this information in project exercise
books.

Ss draw a floor plan of the classroom photograph they chose. Ss choose one aspect
they would like to include in their own classroom, sketch, draw or paint a detailed 3D image of it.

Ss will be encouraged to document there gained understandings within the class project
blog.
Blooms Taxonomy: Evaluate
Multiple Intelligences: LM, SV, L
Differentiation: Modified- T provides Ss with photographs of different classrooms in a variety of ways
alongside a series of cards containing initial thought starters (e.g. is it ...opened, closed, inside, outside).
Extension-Ask Ss to choose two photographs and compare and contrast their features.

6
Science
Beyond the
Classroom

1.1
1.2
2.1
2.2
2.4
2.6

1 Hour
40 mins

how does change the way


people interact with each
other?

T asks Ss to research buildings outside the school context that have varied surfaces
such as curved, flat, cylinders, cones and spheres, pyramids specifically considering their faces,
edges and vertices.

Divide the class into mixed ability groups. T will give each group a different 3dimensional focus (cylinder, cone and sphere/ prisms or pyramids) Ss will be asked to find real life
buildings containing these shapes, one example per shape. Ask the group to describe the faces, edges
and vertices of the building. Ss will select the format to record their findings.

Groups describe their finding back to the class and collaboratively discuss differences
recorded

Ss will be encouraged to document there gained understandings within the class project
blog.
Blooms Taxonomy: Applying

Assessment as learning:
Observation: T will observe
student engagement,
participation and use of
appropriate language
throughout the lesson.
Formative: T will review S
project learning books to
determine S understandings. T
will review Ss floor plans and
provide feedback to Ss. T & S
will also review S contribution
to the blog.
Assessment as learning:
Observation: T will discern S
understandings and ability to
work cooperatively in their
groups.
Formative: T will listen and
provide feedback to Ss based
on their sharing and recording
of results back to the class. T
will also review S contribution
to the blog.

Classroo
ms from around the
world pictures.
http://blog.timpany.com
/unusualclassrooms.html

project
exercise book

lead
pencils

paper

grid
paper.

Ipads

paper/car
dbaords etc

various
coloured pencils, texas
lead pencils.

IWB

Multiple Intelligences: LM, IE, SV, M


Differentiation: Modified- Ss will be supported by their peers within the mixed ability groups. ExtensionSs are encouraged to write a jingle/ poem/ rap elaborating on their knowledge and understanding on threedimensional shapes.

Page 6 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

7
Classroom
Architect.

1.1
2.2
2.4

T introduces the resource Classroom Architect, that allows the students to create their
classroom.

Ss are encouraged to apply the understandings gained in previous lessons to create


their own ideal classroom.

Ss will download and print out their classroom and upload to the class Project Blog as
well as paste into the project exercise book.

Ss will be encouraged to document their gained understandings within the class project
blog.

1 Hour
40 mins

Blooms Taxonomy: Synthesis


Multiple Intelligences: LM, SV, L, IA
Differentiation: Modified- Ss will receive a planning sheet in order for them to consider and plan before
moving to the online resource. Extension-once Ss complete their ideal classroom using the online resource
they may move onto focusing on one section of their design to create a three- dimensional model using
Minecraft.

Assessment as learning:
Observation: T observes Ss
ability to use online resources
independently to create their
own ideal classroom.

Classroom Architect:
http://classroom.4teachers.or
gProject blog
Project exercise book.

Formative: T will review each


S classroom floor plan to
determine S understandings
and provide feedback. T & Ss
will also review S contribution
to the blog.

Evaluation Questions
Questions to be answered by the teacher:
1.
2.
3.

Has this unit of work effectively met the learning outcomes for all students?
Identify the strategies and experiences that were least effective. Explain how you can improve on these in future teaching?
After completion of this unit of work where would you aim to direct students learning?

Questions to be answered by the students:


1.
2.
3.

Across these unit of work which resources made learning most enjoyable? Explain why?
What aspects of the unit of work over the 7 weeks motivated and engaged you the most in the learning?
If you had do this unit again what would be something what you would modify?

Page 7 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

Individual Component

Grace Levas Educational Philosophy


Teaching is the profession that teaches all other professions I believe this to be the most accurate depiction of the role of a teacher; they are someone who enhances the genuine curiosity
and knowledge within students through inspiring them.

My beliefs have been significantly influenced by my past experiences and will continue to be done so throughout my own learning journey. Its these experiences that have shaped my
understandings and thus formed my own personal teaching values..
Page 8 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

Quality education in a safe and supportive environment


I believe all students are entitled to a quality education, achievable through adopting a student centred approach (Zwang, 2011). I recognise the importance of embracing the multicultural
and linguistic diversity found within the classroom demonstrated through the strengths and limitations presented by each student and further highlighted through their multiple intelligences
(William, 2002; Weir 2008). Thus, I feel that the classroom should be flexible, age appropriate and a relevant learning environment. Through adopting such a viewpoint the classroom
becomes a place of differentiation, where all students are safe and are supported on their individual learning journeys (Wilson, 2002). This differentiation will occur in many forms across
the content, process and product depending on each students needs (Tomlinson, 2003). Gardners multiple intelligences highlights a significant holistic interpretation of differentiation as it
is more than simply content that needs to be differentiated (Gardner, 1994, as cited in McGrath & Noble, 2005). In addition to this, I believe that Gardners theory aligns with Blooms
taxonomy as all students are able to move from lower order thinking to higher order thinking, this opportunity is presented regardless of which style is best suited to each student.

In order to ensure all students are presented with a safe positive learning environment its pivotal that the school is holistically an inclusive place, where students are members of a safe and
respectful learning community who together are stimulated to succeed (Groundwater Smith, Ewing & Cornu, 2012; The Australian Government Department of Education, Employment
Workplace Relations, 2011). As a result students are able to develop intellectually, emotionally, physically and socially within a nurturing method to reach their full potential (Ministerial
Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs, 2008).

Classroom Learning
I deem the classroom to be the destination where each students individual learning is fostered, where interests emerge and curiosity grows. This environment nurtures the interests and
strengths considered pivotal to the learning of each student. I recognise the dynamics of an ever-changing society and realise the influence this has on the children who enter the 21 st
century classroom. Based on this I feel that a wide range of learning strategies are to be embedded where appropriate an integrated unit of work so that knowledge is actively built and not
docilely received by students through the industrial model of learning.

I see the significance of cooperative learning when effectively utilised to promote independence and individual accountability for their own learning so that students build life long skills to
become actively involved citizens (Wilson, 2013; Gillies, 2003). Vygotskys social development theory supports the notion of cooperative learning through highlighting the growth of
students learning which arises from interactions. Additionally, I realise the need for hands on and problem based tasks where students are able to think laterally to tap into their own
creativity. Whilst this is pivotal its reasonable through adopting a balanced approach to teaching through individual, small group and whole class tasks and through writing, acting, drawing
and listening to name a few across all the key learning areas.

21st Century learners and ICT


I believe technology to be fundamentally and implicitly found within students learning. It is no longer a skill to be taught but rather already present for the students deemed digital natives
within current and future classrooms (Prensky, 2001). The embedded nature of ICT is one to be included across all KLAs and used to enhance the learning of students. Its use is one, which
is necessary for effective teaching however overuse can result in hindering the learning of students and thus requires monitoring. ICT should not replace current learning practices but rather
should be used alongside them in order to provide students with an enriched and valuable learning experience. In addition, I believe technology is supportive of interactive teaching, which

Page 9 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

is itself an effective way to connect with a generation of students used to consistent stimulation (Zwang, 2011). Interactive teaching ensures teachers are able to actively engage and thus
involve students in their own learning.

Partnerships with families


The family is the first teacher and thus a valuable commodity however in the absence of carers and parents, loco parentis highlights the pivotal role of a teacher in the lives of their students
(Australian Government Department of Education, Employment Workplace Relations, 2011). Based on this understanding I believe it to be crucial for parents/caregivers and teachers to
work in collaboration in order to ensure consistency for all students (Berk, 2012).

Continued professional learning


I endeavour to continue on my own learning journey, long beyond the conclusion of my university study. I will always be learning and continuing to grow in understandings in order to
adapt my teaching strategies in light of new research. As a result I understand the pivotal nature of continued professional development, as my learning is never complete. As I grow and
learn I feel it is important to continue to adapt based on the research which presents itself, altering my teaching strategies and building on my tool box of ideas. I realise the need to
continue to challenge myself so that I am able to give each day the best I can. For this reason being a reflective practitioner is critical in broadening my knowledge and continuing my
lifelong learning (OConnor & Diggins, 2002).

In conclusion I feel that the thirst for knowledge should not held back by a private high a paying school nor a small publicly funded school rather I strongly believe that all students should
be given the same opportunities to grow in light of new understandings. Based on my beliefs the values, which I deem to be fundamental to my teaching, include fair and consistent,
respect, diversity, compassion and justice.

Marias Educational Philosophy


My Teaching Philosophy first and foremost is to create a learning environment where my students feel safe, supported and respected. This is done through establishing positive relationships
with each student in my class. It is essential to spend time getting to know my students strengths and interest in order for me to make learning relevant to students interests and therefore
being able to create a student-centred learning environment (1.2 Understand how students learn; 2:1 Content and teaching strategies of the teaching area).

In order to maintain a safe, supportive and positive environment in the classroom (DET, 2003), I will ensure I know all my students individually by building rapport, making sure that the
class is a family and that everyone is treated fairly where students wellbeing is nurtured. I will accept and care for each student as a unique individual by celebrating each students diverse
range of abilities, talents, attitudes, values, beliefs, experiences, backgrounds, interests, needs, physical skills, knowledge and capabilities which they will bring to the classroom. This will
Page 10 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

assist in creating a positive classroom climate where students feel they belong, where they are confident, extended and safe and where verbal and physical harassment on gender, racial and
other grounds are prevented and addressed. I will stress the importance of respecting one another and to respect cultural diversity. Konza, Grainger & Bradshaw (2001) found that
Educational researchers have long since determined that positive classroom climates or cultures are more desirable than those that are negative. They have a direct influence on student
learning outcomes (p. 108).

By understanding that all students are different, unique and learn in different ways, my goal is to try and implement various teaching strategies and pedagogies in order to engage students
and improve their learning outcomes. I want my teaching to connect to their lives outside of the classroom so that learning is meaningful to students. Making sure that all students are
engaged through activities. For example; using ICT will help assist students to learn with authentic context, maintain a quality learning environment and engage in higher-order thinking
(Woolfolk & Margetts, 2010). The use of ICT in the classroom also addresses the individual needs of gifted and talented students who demonstrate particular strength in using technology.
The use of technology benefits students as it often creates a more student-centred teaching approach to learning where students are allowed to take ownership of technologies and have
opportunities to self-regulate and self-direct their learning and to create their own artefacts (Groundwater-Smith, Brennan, Mitchell, McFadden & Munns, 2008.)

Along with addressing students particular interests, differentiation is evident through modified and extension tasks for particular students. The modification of core-level tasks are
implemented to ensure that all students have adequate scaffolding and modeling. Students who require a challenge will have the opportunity to undertake extended tasks which have less
guidance and encourage students to work beyond the class stage level. Differentiation is of upmost importance as all students are individuals (1.3 Students with diverse linguistic, cultural,
religious and socioeconomic backgrounds; 1.5 Differentiate teaching to meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities). Groundwater-Smith, Ewing & Cornu
(2010) state Different learners need to be responded to in different ways by their class teacher if they are to continue to be interested in learning and involved in the process (p. 61).

Ensuring that multiple domains of intelligence and learning styles are catered for enhances our collaborative working environment further. Gardners multiple intelligence theory suggests
that greater understanding of a topic can be attained when teachers teach in a variety of ways, which cater for different domains of intelligence (Groundwater-Smith et al., 2010). Students
need the opportunity to gain knowledge through researching in a variety of ways ensuring they are responsible for their own learning. Opportunities for students who excel at interpersonal
and linguistic domains will be evident in the classroom approach taken as well as opportunities for students that excel at intrapersonal and/or spatial/visual tasks will enjoy gaining
knowledge through independent learning.

Cooperative learning principles are used to assist students in order to build on social skills, positives values, individual accountability and equal participation amongst students. Cooperative
learning is very versatile and can be used in all Key Learning Areas. Through this instructional strategy learners work together in small groups to help one another achieve common learning
Page 11 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

goals (Killen, 2012). Killen (2012) states that collaborative learning is based on the belief that learners (of any age or ability) can achieve more by working collaboratively then by working
alone or by passively receiving information from a teacher (p. 227).

Finally, I believe that all disadvantages should be eliminated to promote equality, where all students regardless of SES and cultural background have the same opportunities. I aim to
provide an inclusive classroom environment for all students through cooperative learning as a teaching strategy. This assists in building and forming peer relationships, motivates passive
learners, promotes positive attitudes towards content and reduces stress compared with competitive methods (Killen, 2012).

Overall, my teaching philosophy aims to develop well-rounded individuals through an inclusive classroom environment where all students feel a sense of belonging, positive self-esteem,
empowerment and respect diversity.

Jessica Bradfords Educational Philosophy


As an educator I am aware that I am in a privileged position that allows me to provide quality education to all students (Zwang, 2011). I believe with a quality education the only limit of
our future is our students imaginations. It is my responsibility as an educator is to create a secure safe and supportive environment that is inclusive of all students, equality and respected
should emulate from the learning environment allowing students to feel comfortable to explore, be curious to learn and display their talents (Groundwater Smith, Ewing & Cornu, 2012;
The Australian Government Department of Education, Employment Workplace Relations, 2011)

It is my responsibility to know the students in my class as holistic individuals with varied strengths, learning styles and abilities (DET, 2003). I believe fostering positive supportive
relationships with the students and families is important to collaboratively work together to educate, support and encourage their child, as it is the family, who are the childs first educators
(Berk, 2012). I am aware in the 21st century that many families are made up of different combinations due to the circumstances of their lives, irregardless of their dimensions I will respect
and support families to include them in classroom activities and collaborate with them to allow their child to reach their full potential.Modeling appropriate relationships with families and
other staff at the school will allow the students to see how to behave towards others. The positive environment I create will allow students to not only believe in their own abilities but also
Page 12 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

believe in others around them and form relationships. The multiculturalism and linguistic background diversity of every student needs to be embraced and celebrated as an asset to the class,
particular support and extra scaffolding should be available to students who are still learning English (William, 2002; Weir 2008).

In regards to classroom learning, I believe that each individual's learning should be supported allowing for differentiation of tasks in the classroom. I am aware of students range of skills
and abilities that align with the holistic view of differentiation explained by Gardners multiple intelligences theory (Gardner, 1994, as cited in McGrath & Noble, 2005). I believe in using a
variety of pedagogical and learning strategies to teach the students all KLA areas, working in a variations of individual, small group and whole class collaborations (Killen, 2012). I want to
encourage intrigue in students to make them become life long learners, support their interests and celebrate their progress and strengths. I will endeavor to create engaging interesting
activities to extend childrens learning, I will apply explicit teaching as well as give the students experiences that will discover their learning.

I believe in an integrated approach to curriculum that allows for authentic learning experiences aiming towards personal goals. Project learning provides students with an authentic goal to
understand learning not just as a KLA but as integrated skills they could use in everyday life. When teaching in my classroom I will use the guide of Bloom's taxonomy to begin at lower
level thinking initially and build upon knowledge to learn in more complex ways such as create, project based learning is an example of this.

According to Vygotskys social development theory, learning development comes from interactions of others (Riddle, 2010). I believe that collaborative cooperative learning is an essential
part of classroom life, talking and learning of others is a fundamental part of early understandings of our world around us. Therefore I value discussions, small group and large or whole
class group work as a strategy that can extend a student's zone of proximal development. Cooperative learning allows for scaffolding and talking among others strengthens understanding
of the curriculum content (Riddle, 2010).

I am aware, as an educator, that the context of the 21st century means that the students in my class are already digital natives (Prensky, 2001). Using technology in the classroom is
essential to student engagement and learning across all KLAs however it needs to be embedded to assist and extend learning. Technology can widen a students horizons and provide a
wealth of knowledge, it can stimulate and connect students, but caution should be exercised to monitor the students activity online during classroom activities (Zwang, 2011). I see the
benefits of the use of technology but I also want to encourage students to be present in the world around them, to engage with their environment as well. I want them to see the learning in
their present everyday lives and apply their understandings of content learnt in class.

Page 13 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

Choosing the teaching profession means I will never stop learning, my university studies are not the end of my learning, I will further and extend my learning with other educational
opportunities, learn experience from other teachers and learn from experiences I have with my students. I am open to these experiences and will always endeavour to keep researching and
gaining more knowledge so I am well equipped to assist the students I teach in their educational learning journey.

I believe that every child is destined for greatness in their life path and it is my job to ensure that the students are supported to reach their full potential and become hollistic individuals that
can create good for the future. It is through treating them with respect, dignity and celebrating their strengths and progress in a safe environment which will allow them to reach their full
potential. I believe having high expectations and having common, authentic, achievable, real life, academic goals will allow students to feel free to explore the wealth of knowledge that is
at their fingertips.

References
Board of Studies Teaching and Educational Standards NSW. (2012). Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. Retrieved http://www.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au/publications-policiesresources/publications/australian-professional-standards-for-teachers/

Board of Studies NSW. (2014). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum. Sydney. Retrieved from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/science/

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum. Sydney. Retrieved from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/maths/k6_maths_syl.pdf

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). K-6 Creative Arts Syllabus. Retrieved from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/creative-arts

Department of Education and Training [DET]. (2003). Quality Teaching in NSW Public Schools. Sydney.

Page 14 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

Berk, L. E. (2012). Infants, children, and adolescents (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Education.

Gillies, R. (2003). Structuring cooperative group work in classrooms. International Journal of Educational Research, 39 (1-2), p.35-49. Retrieved from
http://www.sciencedirect.com.ezproxy2.acu.edu.au/science/article/pii/S0883035503000727

Groundwater-Smith, S., Brennan M., Mitchell J., McFadden M., & Munns G. (2008). Secondary Schooling in a Changing World (2nd ed.). Australia: Cengage Learning Australia

Groundwater-Smith, S., Ewing, R., & Cornu, R.L. (2010). Teaching Challenges and Dilemmas: Understanding learner diversity (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning
Australia.

Groundwater-Smith, S., Ewing R., Cornu, R. L. (2010). Teaching Challenges and Dilemmas: Understanding learner diversity (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage
Learning Australia.

Groundwater-Smith, S., Ewing, R., & Le Cornu, R. (2012). The learning environment. In Harris, J., and Moran, W., (2012). EDFD220/EDFD260 Teaching and Managing
Learning Environments. (4th ed.). Victoria, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited.

Killen, R. (2012). Effective Teaching Strategies: Lessons from research and practice (6th ed.). Australia: Cengage Learning Australia

Konza, D., Grainger, J., & Bradshaw K. (2001). Classroom Management: A Survival Guide (1st ed.). Australia: Cengage Learning Australia

McGrath, H., & Noble, T. (2005). Eight ways at once: Multiple Intelligences + Revised Blooms Taxonomy = 200 Differentiated Classroom Strategies. French Forests, Australia:
Pearson Education Australia.

Page 15 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Young Affairs. (2008). Melbourne Declaration o Educational Goals for Young Australians. Melbourne, Victoria:
Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Young Affairs.

OConnor, A., & Diggins, C. (2002). On reflection: Reflective practice for early childhood educators. Aotearoa, NZ: Open Mind Publishing.!

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants Part 1. On the Horizon. 9(5), 2-6.

Riddle, E. (2010). Lev Vygotskys Social Development Theory. [E-Book]. Retrieved from http://funwithfcs.uvjvs.wikispaces.net/file/view/LevVygotsky.pdf

Woolfolk, A., & Margetts, K. (2010). Educational Psychology. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia.

The Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. (2011). Family-School Partnerships Framework: A guide for schools and families.
Carlton South, Victoria: Ministerial Council on Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs. Retrieved from
http://www.familyschool.org.au/files/3013/8451/8364/Family-school_partnerships_framework.pdf

The Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. (2011). The National Safe Schools Framework. Carlton South, Victoria: Ministerial
Council on Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs.
Tomlinson, C., A. (2001). How to differentiate instruction in mixed-ability classrooms. (2nd ed.) Upper Saddle River, New Jersey. Pearson Education.

Weir, L. (2008) Research review: Multimodal Learning through Media Edutopia, Retrieved from http://www.edutopia.org/multimodal-learning-teaching-methods-media

Page 16 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

William, B.,R. (2002) Multiple Intelligences for differentiated learning. USA, California: Sage Publications.

Wilson, L. (2013). Ten Ways to Sharpen Your Use of Clusters and Collaborative Learning. Journal of Interdisciplinary Research in Education. 3(1). p 1-4.
http://www.taylors.edu.my/jire/downloads/07.pdf

Zwang, J. (2011). Ten Ideas for Interactive Teaching. Retrieved from http://www.eschoolnews.com/2011/06/06/ten-ideas-for-interactive-teaching/

Appendices

Appendix 1: Breakdown of 10 week unit of work outcomes and indicators.


Appendix 2: Resources which can be used to support the implementation of this unit of work.
Appendix 3: Newspaper to launch the unit of work (Week 1, Lesson 1)

Page 17 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

Appendix 1: Breakdown of 10 week unit of work outcomes and indicators.


Week

KLA

Mathematics

Outcomes
MA2-14MG: Makes, compares, sketches and names three-dimensional objects, including
prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones and spheres, and describes their features
MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent,
mathematical ideas
ST2-14BE: describes how people interact within built environments and the factors

Science

Creative arts

Mathematics

considered in their design and construction


VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or
beautiful* by choosing among aspects of subject matter.

MA2-14MG: Makes, compares, sketches and names three-dimensional objects, including


prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones and spheres, and describes their features
MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent,
mathematical ideas
ST2-14BE: describes how people interact within built environments and the factors

Science

Creative Arts

Page 18 of 23

considered in their design and construction


VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or
beautiful* by choosing among aspects of subject matter.

Indicators
Ss will
1.1 - contribute appropriately to class discussions
1.2 - observe the 3D shapes within their environment referring to these with the
appropriate terminology.
1.3 - effectively use artistic techniques to capture the emotions felt within their
classroom.
1.4 - accurately identify various prisms and their features within a range of
environments and describe them.
1.5 - consider and discuss the reasoning for design choices within differing
environments.

Ss will
1.1 - contribute appropriately to class discussions
1.2 - observe the 3D shapes within their environment referring to these with the
appropriate terminology.
2.1 - accurately represent 3D shapes in real life situations based on the clues
provided.
2.2 - make relevant contributions and engage in adequate conversations in the class
project blog
2.3 - explore and conduct research of classrooms around the world.
2.4 - apply previously gained understandings to new contexts.
2.5 - create accurate classroom floorplans incorporating gained understandings.
2.6 - share and reflect on understandings with the class.
2.7 - experiment with techniques to demonstrate focal points within their
classroom.

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

Mathematics

MA2-14MG: Makes, compares, sketches and names three-dimensional objects, including


prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones and spheres, and describes their features
MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent,
mathematical ideas
ST2-14BE: describes how people interact within built environments and the factors

Science

Creative arts

Mathematics

considered in their design and construction


VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or
beautiful* by choosing among aspects of subject matter.

MA2-14MG: Makes, compares, sketches and names three-dimensional objects, including


prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones and spheres, and describes their features
MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent,
mathematical ideas
ST2-14BE: describes how people interact within built environments and the factors

Science

Creative Arts

Page 19 of 23

Ss will
1.1 - contribute appropriately to class discussions
2.2 - make relevant contributions and engage in adequate conversations in the class
project blog
3.1 - consider in depth the 3D shapes found within objects in the classroom
3.2 - accurately represent and provide reasoning for the use of cubes,pyramids,
cylinders and cones within classroom objects.

considered in their design and construction


VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or
beautiful* by choosing among aspects of subject matter.

Ss will
1.1 - contribute appropriately to class discussions
2.2 - make relevant contributions and engage in adequate conversations in the class
project blog
4.1 - make comparisons with their own classroom and various classrooms around
the world.
4.2 - investigate the 2D shapes that make up the faces of the 3D shapes that they
have been researching.
4.3 - creatively showcase an element of these classrooms they would like to see in
their own future classroom.
4.4 - apply the understandings gained throughout this lesson, analyse what they
have previously designed and make appropriate adaptations as a result.

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

Mathematics

MA2-18SP: Selects appropriate methods to collect data, and constructs, compares,


interprets and evaluates data displays, including tables, picture graphs and column
graphs.
MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent,
mathematical ideas

Science

ST2-14BE: describes how people interact within built environments and the factors
considered in their design and construction

Creative arts

Mathematics

VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or
beautiful* by choosing among aspects of subject matter.
MA2-18SP: Selects appropriate methods to collect data, and constructs, compares,
interprets and evaluates data displays, including tables, picture graphs and column
graphs.
MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent,
mathematical ideas

Science

ST2-14BE: describes how people interact within built environments and the factors
considered in their design and construction

Creative arts

Mathematics

MA2-18SP: Selects appropriate methods to collect data, and constructs, compares,


interprets and evaluates data displays, including tables, picture graphs and column
graphs.

ST2-14BE: describes how people interact within built environments and the factors
considered in their design and construction

Creative arts

Mathematics

Page 20 of 23

Ss will
1.1 - contribute appropriately to class discussions
2.2 - make relevant contributions and engage in adequate conversations in the class
project blog
6.1 - interpret and discuss the findings of their survey.
6.2 - appropriately make adaptations to the survey and then use these to survey the
parents who visited the class during week 1.
6.3 - draw comparisons between the survey results made with other students and
those with the parents.
6.4 - express these differences through a creative medium.
6.5 - communicate their findings from 1 of these surveys in the form of a graph.

VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or
beautiful* by choosing among aspects of subject matter.

MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent,


mathematical ideas
Science

Ss will
1.1 - contribute appropriately to class discussions
2.2 - make relevant contributions and engage in adequate conversations in the class
project blog
5.1 - work together to construct a survey which adequately elicits the intended
information which will be relevant to their final classroom design project.
5.2 - interpret graphs appropriately, eliciting important trends found within them.
5.3 - use their understandings to make appropriate research choices and share
meaningful information.
5.4 - identify the ways in which data can be collected.

Ss will
1.1 - contribute appropriately to class discussions
2.2 - make relevant contributions and engage in adequate conversations in the class
project blog
7.1 - interpret graphs appropriately, eliciting important trends found within them.
7.2 - apply the understandings gained through the graphs and within their own
design.
7.3 - use artistic techniques to creatively depict their ideal classroom and
exaggerating key elements within it.

VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or
beautiful* by choosing among aspects of subject matter.
MA2-18SP: Selects appropriate methods to collect data, and constructs, compares,
interprets and evaluates data displays, including tables, picture graphs and column

Ss will
2.2 - make relevant contributions and engage in adequate conversations in the class
project blog

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

graphs.
MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent,
mathematical ideas

8.1 - use understandings gained across the explicit teaching weeks to inform their
design
8.2 - work collaboratively in their groups, sharing the workload and supporting one
another.
8.3 - create a plan to demonstrate the gradual progression from step to step.

MA2-14MG: Makes, compares, sketches and names three-dimensional objects, including


prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones and spheres, and describes their features
Science

Creative arts

Mathematics

ST2-14BE: describes how people interact within built environments and the factors
considered in their design and construction
VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or
beautiful* by choosing among aspects of subject matter.

MA2-18SP: Selects appropriate methods to collect data, and constructs, compares,


interprets and evaluates data displays, including tables, picture graphs and column
graphs.
MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent,
mathematical ideas
MA2-14MG: Makes, compares, sketches and names three-dimensional objects, including
prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones and spheres, and describes their features
ST2-14BE: describes how people interact within built environments and the factors

Science

Ss will
2.2 - make relevant contributions and engage in adequate conversations in the class
project blog
8.1 - use understandings gained across the explicit teaching weeks to inform their
design
8.2 - work collaboratively in their groups, sharing the workload and supporting one
another.
9.1 - use the plan created previously to aid the implementation of their ideas,
making changes along the way and justifying these in written form in their project
exercise book.
9.2 - selecting an appropriate form to present their design

considered in their design and construction


VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or
beautiful* by choosing among aspects of subject matter.

Creative arts

10

Mathematics

MA2-18SP: Selects appropriate methods to collect data, and constructs, compares,


interprets and evaluates data displays, including tables, picture graphs and column
graphs.
MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent,
mathematical ideas
MA2-14MG: Makes, compares, sketches and names three-dimensional objects, including
prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones and spheres, and describes their features
ST2-14BE: describes how people interact within built environments and the factors

Page 21 of 23

Ss will
1.1 - contribute appropriately to class discussions
2.2 - make relevant contributions and engage in adequate conversations in the class
project blog
8.2 - work collaboratively in their groups, sharing the workload and supporting one
another.
10.1 - use understandings gained across the explicit teaching weeks to inform their
feedback to one another
10.2 - pitch their design to the class, teacher, parents and executive member
demonstrating their understandings in depth.
10.3 - reflect, apply and analyse previously gained understandings to their own and

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

Science

considered in their design and construction

the projects of other students.

VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or
Creative arts

beautiful* by choosing among aspects of subject matter.

Appendix 2: Resources which can be used to support the implementation of this unit of work.
Resource

Use

Within this unit, the best place to incorporate it is

http://classroom.4teachers.org

This resource, is an interactive classroom designer, it enables Ss to place key


pieces of furniture into the classroom organising these along the way.

Week 2, Lesson 7

Very similar in its focus to the above resource, this online website also enables Ss
to place key pieces of furniture in the classroom, designing its interior. In addition
to this, the resource offers Ss with the choice of classroom shape, desks with
student names on them, paint colours etc.

Week 2, Lesson 7

This website provides ideas for further lessons. This particular lesson is great to
engage Ss in considering the purpose key features contained within the classroom.

Week 2/3

http://teacher.scholastic.com/tools/class_setup/

http://www.teachingideas.co.uk/dt/objectotd.htm

Page 22 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva

http://blog.timpany.com/unusual-classrooms.html

The project exercise book, has been incorporated for Ss to note down their gradual
progression of understandings. It is a place where all thoughts will be maintained
for easy identification and reflection.

Throughout the course of the unit.

The project blog, has been incorporated within this unit for many reasons.
Primarily it is an opportunity to reflect on understandings with discussions being
promoted between Ss. In addition to this, it enables Ss to take their learning beyond
the school and discuss where they may be applying these understandings outside of
the classroom.

Throughout the course of the unit.

This website showcases a range of diverse classrooms, places in schools around the
world.

Week 2, Lesson 5

This box, contains endless general resources to inspire the creativity of Ss and will
be made easily accessible at all times.

Throughout the course of the unit.

Box of

Creativity
Appendix 3: Newspaper to launch the unit of work (Week 1, Lesson 1)

Page 23 of 23

Maria Roncancio, Jessica Bradford & Graziella Leva