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Liutova Marina's Orientation Course

Sample Learning Materials

Non scholae sed vitae discimus


We do not learn for school, but for life (Seneca the Younger)

Welcome to the Orientation Course.


Dear Participants,
This is a brief introduction to the essential resources you will need in the Foundations of
Stylistics blended/hybrid course. It is intended to help you understand the way the class
will work and to introduce you to the essential resources you will need on your academic
journey. The goal of the Orientation Course is to support your academic, practical, and
emotional preparedness as you begin your blended/hybrid class. The skills you will
acquire as you go through the Orientation Course will ensure your successful
participation in and a successful completion of the Foundations of Stylistics.

ARE YOU READY FOR DISTANCE LEARNING?


Before you go any further, it is important that you know what you are getting into by
taking a blended/hybrid class.
Broadly speaking, a blended/hybrid course is a combination of online and traditional
face-to-face learning.

Blended/Hybrid courses combine regular classroom meetings with online instruction,


reducing the number of hours a class meets on campus.
For an introduction to and a better understanding of what blended learning implies,
please, watch the following video by Jen Jonson (if you are not new to blended learning,
please, proceed to the Course Syllabus; you will find the link to the Syllabus at the
bottom of the page, or you can access the Syllabus by clicking on 'Syllabus' in the Course
Navigation Menu).
After watching the video, you should be able to (1) identify hallmarks of a blended
learning environment, and (2) understand the difference between a blended class and a
technology-facilitated class.
Jonson, J. (January 20, 2014). Blended learning and technology integration [Video].
Retrieved from YouTube. Used in accordance with the provisions of the Standard YouTube
License available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 8 minutes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KD8AUfGsCKg.
The Foundations of Stylistics class meets once or twice a week in the face-to-face mode
(please, check the course schedule to determine when the class meets on campus), but
much of what you will do as a class happens while you, as the students, and the instructor
are physically apart. You will meet your instructor in the classroom for two hours at the
start of the week to discuss the upcoming activities or to review concepts, but for the
other three hours of classtime you will be logging into a virtual classroom community
where you will receive lectures, complete assignments, and hold discussions with your
classmates in an online forum just as you would if you were sitting at a desk in the
traditional face-to-face classroom. Again, you will be "in class" on the computer a
minimum of 3 hours per week, which is in addition to the time you will spend
completing homework assignments.
The following modules will help you to assess your familiarity with the requirements and
resources necessary to complete the course, to view, access and explore a variety of
resources tailored to meet your immediate needs as you begin your program:
Module 1: Technology Overview
Module 2: Attributes of a Successful Distance Learner
Module 3: Resources for Success

Please, proceed to the Syllabus (You can click on the link or access
the Syllabus by clicking on "Syllabus" in the Navigation Menu Bar).
The link has been intentionally invalidated for the Sample learning materials
presentation.

References
All images are retrieved from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl (a free image bank)
Jonson, J. (January 20, 2014). Blended learning and technology integration [Video]. Retrieved from
YouTube.

General Information: What the Syllabus is and why it is


important that you study it.
The syllabus is a document prepared by the instructor to
help those enrolled in the course understand (1) the
structure of the course (course format and delivery
method, number of credit hours), (2) a list of learning
objectives for the course of study, (3) (the instructor's)
expectations of the students' participation and
performance, (4) an outline of the topics covered within
the course, (5) a list of course materials, such as books,
articles, media, and/or links online resources, (6) the
course assignments and the assignment schedule, (7) the
criteria for assignment submission assignments to the
instructor, (8) the assessment process, (9) the students'
responsibilities, (10) an outline of the university policies
pertaining to the course, and (11) instructor contact
information.(Simonson et al, 2012).
Generally speaking, the syllabus provides a student with
an understanding of the possibilities the course offers, as
well as of the requirements a students must meet to go
through and complete the course successfully.

Syllabus for the Orientation Course


Course Delivery Method: The Orientation Course is designed as a guided online
course, however, it is mandatory and requires that you participate in a number of
activities that serve to prepare you for the blended/hybrid Foundations of Stylistics
course. Please, be sure to start investigating the issues covered in the Orientation Course
as soon as possible so that you afford yourself ample opportunity to acquire the skills
necessary for your academic success in a blended course.

Course Format: The course consists of 3 weeks. Each week contains learning
activities and assignments designed to improve your distance learning skills and increase
your understanding of a student's role and responsibilities in a blended/hybrid learning
setting. Viewing, reading, discussing, writing, and reflecting are the essential, mutually
reinforcing learning activities that will raise your distance learning awareness.

The activities and assignments should be completed in sequence, since the course content
is progressive.

Credit Hours: 0.
Learning Objectives:

Students will:

understand the utility of a course syllabus;


understand the purpose of the course technology tools;
employ the course technology tools to complete the course assignments;
use the course navigation menu;
explain the characteristics of successful distance learners;
categorize the charatceristics of successful distance learners;
reflect on their own readiness for distance learning;
do independent online research;
develop a list of supplemental resources;
use APA for reference formatting.

Student Participation: During Week 1, you are required to participate in one


Discussion in which you will introduce yourself to the rest of the class and respond to
your classmates' postings. During Week 2, you are required to post to your personal blog
and respond to a minimum of 2 blog posts by your classmates. During Week 3, you are
required to contribute to a class wiki. The assignments of the course are intended to help
the class build a dynamic learning community, therefore your active participation in the
learning activities and timely completion of assignments are critical to the success of the
entire class.

Course Outline:
Week 1: Module 1 - Technology Overview
Week 2: Module 2 - Attributes of a Successful Distant Learner
Week 3: Module 3 - Resources for Success

Course Materials: You can download the list of the Orientation course materials if
you click on the following link Complete List. (The link has been intentionally
invalidated for the Sample learning materials presentation.)

Course Assignments and Assignment Schedule:

Rationale for assignments: The assignments are intended to provide students with handon experience in using the technology they will need to be familiar with in the
Foundations of Stylistics blended course. The assignments also help the learners to selfassess their own readiness for distance learning.
Week 1:
Discussion Forum "Meeting the Class". Your initial post is due by Wednesday, 11:59 pm
Eastern Time (ET). Responses to you classmates' discussion posts are due by Sunday,
11:59 pm Eastern Time (ET).
Week 2:
Mindmap and Blog post "The R's of Successful Learning Online". You blog post is due
by Friday, 11:59 pm Eastern Time (ET). Responses to you classmates' blog posts are due
by Sunday, 11:59 pm Eastern Time (ET).
Week 3:
Wiki "Supplemental Resources for Success". Your contribution to the class wiki is due
by Sunday, 11:59 pm Eastern Time (ET).

Criteria for Assignment Submission Assignments to the Instructor:


Although you have an instructor in the Orientation Course, there are no assighments to
be submitted directly to the instuctor.

Assessment Process: None of the assignments in the Orientation course are graded.
The assesment of student participation and performance is purely formative: each student
will receive personalized feedback from the instructor.

Students' Responsibilities:

It is a student's
responsibility to

University Policies:

study the course materials;


participate in class activities on a regular basis;
stick to the course schedule;
adhere to university policies;
contact the instructor, when needed (Simonson et al, 2012);
communicate with other class members (Simonson et al, 2012);
demonstrate respect for other class members and the instructor.

Academic integrity is each student's intellectual development. Each student and faculty
member is expected to recognize and respect the requirements of academic integrity and
accept responsibility for academic honesty. Therefore, it is presumed that any student
enrolling in the course agrees to acknowledge the research and ideas of others in his or
her work.

Instructor Contact Information:


You instructor in the Orientation course is Liutova Marina, BA.

Contact information:

telephone number (not toll free) - +79036837409


e-mail: marina.liutova@waldenu.edu
Skype: lyutovamv1

Any student can contact the instructor Monday through Friday via telephone from
10:00am till 2:00pm Eastern Time (ET).
Any student is welcome to send an e-mail at any time, and expect an answer within 24
hours.
Skype connection is available Tuesday through Thursday from 11:00 am till 2:00 pm
Eastern Time (ET).
Please, feel free to contact the instructor via any of these communication tools to discuss
any issues that may arise while you go through the Orienttion course. Your questions are
most welcome.
Thank you for reviewing the Syllabus.
Please, go to Module 1 Technology Overview The link has
been intentionally invalidated for the Sample learning materials
presentation.
You can access Module 1 by clicking the link above or by clicking on "Modules/Module 1" in the
Navigation Menu Bar.
References
The images are retrieved from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl (a free image bank)
Simonson, M., Smaldino, S., Albright, M., & Zvacek, S. (2012). Teaching and learning at a
distance: Foundations of distance education (5th ed.) Boston, MA: Pearson.

Module 1: Technology Overview


Students taking a hybrid course must have access to a personal computer with a reliable
Internet connection and browser software.

Hybrid students should be comfortable using computer technology.


Before you start the course, please, familiarize yourself with the technology you will be
expected to use when completing and presenting your course assignments, and working
with course materials.
First of all, it is important that you familiarize yourself with the Canvas CMS TM (a
trademark of Instructure Inc.) used for the Orientation Course and the Foundations of
Stylistics Course. Please, click on the following link for the Intro To Canvas:

Student Overview

1.

Discussion Board

During the course, you will participate in weekly online discussions by posting to the
Discussion Forums and commenting on your classmates' posts.
The following tutorial will introduce you to the Canvas Discussion Board. After
watching the tutorial, you should be able to (1) access the necessary discussion forum;
(2) create and edit a new post; (3) create a 'reply' post.
GoChokers. (April 15, 2013). Canvas Tutorial: Posting to Course Discussions
[Video]. Retrieved from YouTube. Used in accordance with the provisions of the Standard
YouTube License available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms..
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 2 minutes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bs1goyhCmew.

2.

Wiki

For you group project you will be expected to collobate with the other members of the
group that you will be assigned to. Discussions, sharing of text and graphics within each
group will be conducted through a Canvas-hosted wiki. You will also be required to use a
wiki for note-taking and note-sharing during face-to-face meetings.
Please, watch the following video instructions on how to create shared documents using
the Collaborations Board. After watching the tutorial, you should be able to (1) identify
the major difference beyween EtherPad and GoogleDocs; (2) create a new shared
document; (3) create a collaboration group.
Office of Learning Technologies. (August 26, 2014). Collaborations in Canvas
[Video]. Retrieved from YouTube. Used in accordance with the provisions of the Standard
YouTube License available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 4 minutes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yecWlBlW92M.

3.

Podcasting

Podcasts are used for part of your learning materials. Please, ensure that you have an
MP3 player installed on your computer or any other device that you are planning to use
to access the learning materials.

4.

Mindmaps

Mindmaps are a useful tool to structure, organize, memorize, arrange, brainstorm and
learn information. There are no restrictions on the type of software that you will use to
create mindmaps. If you have never used mind-mapping software, you will find
Text2MindMap 2013 by Text2MindMap.com (www.text2mindmap.com) very
beginner-friendly. Text2MindMap is a free mind-mapping tool that allows users to make
as many maps online as they need and save the mindmaps on their personal PCs. The
following tutorial will introduce you to the Text2MindMap functions. After watching the
tutorial, you should be able to (1) sign in; (2) create a mindmap online; (3) organize and
group map objects into nodes; (4) customize maps (font size, line color, text color); and
(5) download mindmaps in JPEG format.
Stone, A. (July 24, 2013). Text2MindMap tutorial [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube.
Used in accordance with the provisions of the Standard YouTube License available at
http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 5 minutes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9D99m3IPMeY.

5.

Blogs

During the course, you will be required to keep a blog adding posts on self-identified
course-related topics. You can use your existing blog; however, it is advisable that you
create a separate blog for your learning purposes. If you are new to blogging, you will
find WordPressTM (trademark of WordPress Foundation) an easy-to-use and
functionally rich resourse. The following tutorial provides detailed instructions on how to
create, customize, and manage your wordpress blog. After watching the tutorial, you
should be able to (1) navigate the User Dashboard; (2) create a new post; and (3) edit a
published post.
LearnWebCode. (April 29, 2014). WordPress tutorial 1: Introduction [Video].
Retrieved from YouTube. Used in accordance with the provisions of the Standard YouTube
License available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 13 minutes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8OBfr46Y0cQ.
If you need more information on WordPress, please, visit http://learnwebcode.com/learnwordpress/ ( .) for a collection of tutorials created by Brad
Schiff, the author of Learn Web Code 2015 LearnWebCode.

Please go to Module

1 Assignment

(The link has been intentionally invalidated for the Sample learning materials
presentation.)
You can also access Module 1 Assignment by clicking on "Assignments/Module 1 Assignment" in
the Course Navigation Menu.

References (module 1)
All the images are retrieved from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl (a free image bank).
GoChokers. (April 15, 2013). Canvas Tutorial: Posting to Course Discussions [Video]. Retrieved
from YouTube.
LearnWebCode. (April 29, 2014). WordPress tutorial 1: Introduction [Video]. Retrieved from
YouTube.
NewclassroomProf. (August 14, 2014). CANVAS Student Tutorial 1: Navigation Basics [Video].
Retrieved from YouTube.
Office of Learning Technologies. (August 26, 2014). Collaborations in Canvas [Video]. Retrieved
from YouTube.
Stone, A. (July 24, 2013). Text2MindMap tutorial [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube.

Module 2: Tips for Academic Success in


Distance Learning
Non scholae sed vitae discimus
We do not learn for school, but for life. (Seneca the
Younger)
Dear Participants,
None of you is new to education, especially traditional face-to-face educational settings,
and you have already developed a set of skills and attitudes that contributed to your
success in a face-to-face learning environment. However, most of you are new to
distance learning.
While most learner skills and attitudes are transferrable and applicable across subjects
and educational modes, they are often given different emphasis to and their practical
application differs from mode to mode, which requires some students to reconsider their
approach to studies, to reset priorities, and, in some cases, relearn how to learn
(Graham, 2005) in order to adapt to and thrive in a new learning environment.
The course you have enrolled in, Foundations of Stylistics, is a blended course, which
means that part of the time you will meet the instructor and your peers on campus. It is
during your on-campus time that you will have an opportunity to demonstrate the
communication and academic skills you developed during you undergraduate studies.
However, most of the time, you will interact with the instructor, your peers, and the
learning materials online and many will find it challenging, even daunting, to keep up
the academic mark in a totally unfamiliar learning environment.
The online portion of the course is designed in accordance with the major propositions of
the Theory of Independent Study advanced by Charles A. Wedemeyer. One of the
key tenets of the theory is that successful distance learning rests on learner
independence and adoption of technology as a way to implement that
independence and individualize learning, which takes place through the students
activity (Simonson et al, 2012, p.43-44). It follows that a successful distance learner
takes responsibility for his/her own learning and is:

Self-disciplined, self-reliant, self-motivated, self-directed (Marsh-Nation, n.d.),


able to evaluate and monitor their own learning, and to select their own
learning strategies and materials (Smith, Murphy, & Mahoney as quoted in

Gascoigne & Parnell, 2014, para.8), but willing to seek help, when needed
(Smarter Services, 2011);
Is perseverant (Spokane Community College, n.d.);
Technology-literate (Friend, 2010);
An independent thinker and problem-solver (Marsh-Nation, n.d.);
Is actively intellectually engaged (Spokane Community College, n.d.);
Committed to high ethical behavior standards (Marsh-Nation, n.d.).

If that sounds like took much, if you are alarmed that you have not yet developed these
skills, you are already on the right track you do not overestimate yourself, nor do you
underestimate the challenge of the course, the commitment required, or the level of your
responsibilities.
Please, be assured, that nothing is impossible to a willing heart and students' strengths
in these areas . . . emerge and grow by virtue of participating in an online course.
Students from all backgrounds, academic levels, and differing degrees of computer
experience have proven to be successful in online courses (Friend, 2010, para.9). To be
successful, an online student has to want to succeed. Online learning requires
independence, internal motivation, responsibility, and a certain level of maturity
(iseek.org. n.d., para.25).
And, remember, while being only partly academic, these skills and attitudes are fully
integral to a lifelong learner skills/attitude kit, and will ultimately serve you after you
complete your studies. As educators, we see our mission as broader than delivering
subject knowledge and subject-related skills only. Thus, we went hybrid so as to be able
to equip our students with the extra-curriculum 21st century skills that will secure
them a place in todays knowledge economy (Brown & Adler, 2008). Always
remember:

Non scholae sed vitae discimus


We do not learn for school, but for life. (Seneca the Younger)
Let this insight guide you throughout your learning experience.
Now to the brass tacks of the course that is about to start. As students you are expected to
develop and demonstrate the following skills and attitudes:

Academic integrity You are certainly not new to the topic and have throughout your
prior education paid attention to such plagiarism-related issues as authenticity,
proper/improper citation, failing to acknowledge another persons authorship,
unauthorized borrowing of ideas, misrepresenting another persons work. Academic
Integrity requirements come in at every point of your studies, and, most notably, in the
writing that you submit to your instructor or share with your peers. Plagiarism is one of
the most common issues encountered in academic writing. However, it can be avoided by
paying attention to some details while writing for an academic audience. (Please, go
to Academic Integrity And Paraphrasing Skills for more information on the concept).
Basic technical-skills Hybrid learning is partly based on online-communication: you
will need these to create new documents, use a word processing program, navigate the
Internet, download software, participate in Discussion Forums, GoogleDocs project
discussions, individual and team project development, and getting access to some
learning materials. (Please, check Module 1 of the Orientation course to review the tools
you will need throughout the course).
Critical thinking skills Taking nothing for granted is a privilege of a true scholar and a
responsible citizen, a privilege that takes one a lot of time and effort to nurture. Critical
thinking is a skill that helps one move towards self-reliance. "Memorize the solution to a
problem, and you may master that particular problem; improve your critical thinking, and
you will give yourself the tools to create your own effective solutions to a multitude of
unfamiliar problems" (QualiaSoup, December 24, 2009). (Please, go to Critical Thinking
for more information on the concept).
Time management skills Distance learners should be energetic and disciplined
managers of their own time (Marsh-Nation, n.d., para.5). Multiple family and job
commitments will intrude, be ready for that not to have to make unnecessary sacrifices.
As Theodore Roosevelt said, "When you play, play hard; when you work, don't play at
all" (as quoted in Simonson, March 1, 2014). (Please, go to Time Management for more
information on the concept of time-management).
Reading and Writing Communication skills Distance learning largely relies on
learning materials that are to be read and assignments that are to be submitted in the
written form, the written word is vital in distance education (Marsh-Nation, n.d.,
para.6). The very nature of the course, Foundations of Stylistics, will provide you with an
understanding of the differences between the spoken and the written varieties of
language, as well as many an insight into effective communication through writing and
text-interpretation.
Netiquette skills One of the first things you will learn in the Foundations of Stylistics is
the concept of functional styles / registers / discourses as a patterned variety of written
text characterized by the greater or lesser typification of its constituents[and] in which
the choice and arrangement of interdependent and interwoven language media are

calculated to secure the purport of the communication (Galperin, 2012, p.249).


Netiquette is a relatively new concept; however, due to its massive nature, online-based
communication has developed its own culture, which is to be respected and observed by
all those engaged (Please, go to Netiquette for more information on the concept).
Interpersonal, Negotiation skills, Teamwork, and Collaboration skills These are,
probably, the skills you demonstrated as early as in K-12, and are certain to capitalize on
during the face-to face sessions of this course. However, teamwork and collaboration
based on online communication is different, and those new to distance learning often find
collaborating online challenging. (Please, go to Teamwork And Collaboration for more
information on the concept).
Formative peer assessment skills These will come into play the moment you first
comment on a peers post in the Discussion Forum, or when, later in the course, you
comment on your project team members contribution to the project. And this is closely
tied to critical thinking, interpersonal, negotiation, netiquette, and writing communication
skills. (Please, go to Formative Assessment, Peer Assessment, And Self Assessment for
more information on the concepts)
Self-assessment skills These skills are akin to reflection, taking a critical look at the
work you have produced and looking for ways to perfect yourself. "Self-assessment 'in
an educational setting' involves students making judgments about their own work.
Assessment decisions can be made by students on their own essays, reports, projects,
presentations, performances, dissertations, and even exam scripts. Self-assessment can be
extremely valuable in helping students to critique their own work, and form judgements
about its strengths and weaknesses" (Academic Dictionaries and Encyclopedias, n.d.).

The final note worth making is:

Distance learning is never about learning in isolation;


During the online-only periods of your blended class, your instructor and
the university supporting agencies are only a click or a phone call away!
The key to productive learning is for the learner to have clear personal
goals and learn with and from others in the class: be active, participate,
collaborate, contribute, and share.

We wish you all the best in your new academic endeavor.

Please, proceed to Module

2 Assignment

(The link has been intentionally invalidated for the Sample


learning materials presentation.)
You can also access Module 2 Assignment by clicking on
"Assignments/Module 2 Assignment" in the Course Navigation
Menu.

References (module 2)
Academic Dictionaries and Encyclopedias. (n.d.). Self-assessment. Retrieved from
http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/141632
Brown, J. S., & Adler, R. P. (2008). Minds on fire: Open education, the long tail, and learning 2.0.
EDUCAUSE Review, 43(1), 1632.
Friend, B., (2010). Attributes of successful online learners. Retrieved from
http://www.homeeddirectory.com/articles/8_Feb09.
Galperin, I.R. (2012). English stylistics (4th ed.). Moscow: URSS.
Gascoigne, C., & Parnell, J. (2014). Distance education readiness assessments: An overview and
application. Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 17(4). Retrieved from
http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/winter174/gascoigne_parnell174.html.
Graham, C.R. (2005). The handbook of blended learning. New York: Pfeifer.
Iseek.org.(n.d.). What makes a successful online learner. Retrieved from
https://www.iseek.org/education/successonline.html
Marsh-Nation, M. (n.d.). Attributes of successful learners. ASET Online Education. Retrieved from
(http://www.google.ru/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CB4QFjAA&url=htt
p%3A%2F%2Fasetedu.org%2Ffile.php%2F1%2FAttributesOfSuccessfulLearners.pdf%3Fforcedownload%3D1&ei=M
JfOVKiNF8u5ygON8ILQCg&usg=AFQjCNHjwSswo90LZZC8TCwwR8adlrdhQ&bvm=bv.85076809,d.bGQ&cad=rjt.
QualiaSoup (Producer). (December 24, 2009). Critical thinking [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube
on February 1, 2015.
Simonson, M. (March 1, 2014). Where is as important as Why, When, and What. Distance
Learning, 11(1).

Simonson, M., Smaldino, S., Albright, M., & Zvacek, S. (2012). Teaching and learning at a
distance: Foundations of distance education (5th ed.) Boston, MA: Pearson.
SmarterServices.com (2011). 2011 student readiness report. Retrieved from
http://partner.pearson.com/sites/default/files/2011%20Student%20Readiness%20Report.pdf
Spokane Community College. (n.d.). Successful student attributes. Retrieved from
http://sites.scc.spokane.edu/collegemathsuccess/successfulstudentattributes.asp.
The image is retrieved from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl (a free image bank).

Module 3: Resources for Success


Module 3 offers you links to tutorials and readings concerning the skills you will be
expected to demonstrate during your Foundations of Stylistics blended course. Here, we
focus on such skills as:
participation in online discussion forums;
online etiquette (netiquette);
effective academic writing;
APA formatting;
and face-to-face presentation skills.
These are some of the skills that will enhance your status both in an academic and a
professional environment.
In identifying these skills as important, we proceed from the assumptions of the Theory
of Interaction and Communication by Brje Holmberg, who holds that for distance
learning to be effective, it is necessary to create feelings of learner-instructor and learnerlearner rapport and generally cater to helpful real and simulated communication to and
from the learner (Simonson et al, 2012, p.49).

Participation in online discussion forums


The Discussion Board is a vital part of communication in online learning. If all
participants agree to follow a few principles of civility and professionalism, the
discussion board can be a great opportunity to express opinions, share ideas, and receive
feedback from peers who are engaged in the same learning objectives (University of
Wisconsin, n.d). The following resources will equip you with useful insights on how to
approach online discussions to make your contribution academically relevant and
socially appropriate.
After watching the video, you should be able to (1) explain the purpose of discussions in
a learning environment; (2) identify the differences between face-to-face and online
discussions; and (3) identify ways to make your contributions to discussion forums
relevant and valuable.

Dold, J. (February 15, 2013). Discussion board etiquette [Video]. Retrieved from
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVqWcrMPxfY.Used in accordance with the provisions of
the Standard YouTube License available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 3 minutes.

Online etiquette (Netiquette)


When participating in online discussion forums, each student is expected to show
courtesy for the needs of others (Simonson et al, 2012, p.231), that it referred to as
netiquette broadly speaking, the do's and don'ts of online communication (Albion.com,
n.d.). Most of you are not new to communication via social networks, and most of you
have sometimes found the experience puzzling and confusing. The following resources
should provide with a full picture of how make online communication effective and
rewarding. While working with the resources, please, pay attention to similarities and
differences between online and face-to-face communication.
After studying these resources, you should be able to (1) define netiquette; (2) explain
the differences between face-to-face and online communication; and (3) identify the basic
netiquette rules.
MSMCOnlineLearning (Producer). (June 3, 2013). Student resources: A guide to
netiquette
in
online
learning
[Presentation].
Retrieved
from
http://www.youtube.com/watch?x-yt-cl=85114404&v=HSnH5nQNAeY&x-ytts=1422579428.Used in accordance with the provisions of the Creative Commons Attribution
License available at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/legalcode.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 6 minutes.

Effective writing
Effective writing skills are the ones that you will find necessary when you participate in
online discussion forums, team projects, and blog assignments. The following link takes
you to a resource rich in advice and practice. As you go through the website options,
please, focus on the information concerning general writing, academic writing, and visual
/ graphical rhetoric (remember, a picture is worth a thousand words). Also, if you are not
sure that you use grammar, punctuation, and/or sentence structure and style
appropriately, the website provides ample information and exercises for you to improve.

After studying the resource, you should be able to (1) identify several various factors that
contribute to strong, well-organized writing, (2) identify the stages of the writing
process, and (3) explain why effective writing is audience-oriented.
Purdue University. (n.d.a). General writing resources. Retrieved from
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/1/. Copyright 1995-2015 by The Writing Lab &
OWL at Purdue University and Purdue University. Used in accordance with their publicly stated
Terms and Conditions of Fair Use available at https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/551/01.
Please, bookmark the website for further reference.

APA Formatting
In Module 2, we discussed the importance of Academic Integrity, part of which is proper
citation and referencing of the resources that students use. The following link takes you
to the Purdue University Online Writing Lab website page containing a collection of tips
on proper use of APA. As you explore the website, please, focus on the APA Formatting
and Study Guide, which covers such issues as in-text citations, copyright permission
notes, and referencing.
After studying the resource, you should be able to (1) identify the major requirements for
an APA-formatted paper; (2) identify the basic APA requirements for in-text citations;
and (3) apply the basic APA referencing rules.
Purdue
University.
(n.d.b).
APA
style.
Retrieved
from
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/. Copyright 1995-2015 by The Writing Lab
& OWL at Purdue University and Purdue University. Used in accordance with their publicly stated
Terms and Conditions of Fair Use available at https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/551/01.
Please, bookmark the website for further reference.

F2F Presentation Skills


Foundations of Stylistics being a blended course, a considerable amount of learning will
take place in a traditional face-to-face setting. According to the course syllabus, you will
be expected to participate in live discussions and present your individual and team
projects in front of the class and the instructor. Many fear the stage. To help you
overcome the fear, here is a collection of empowering videos and articles focusing on
effective delivery skills. Body language, vocal energy, voice variety and intonation,
engaging the audience, and controlling stage fright and nervousness are but a few issues
that experts in the field provide tips on. When you select videos to watch and when you

watch the selected videos, focus on your personally perceived weaknesses, and let you
presentations flourish.
1. After watching the following video, you should be able to (1) explain the value of body
language in F2F presentations, and (2) to identify the basic techniques to engage the
audience through body-language messages.
Raghavendra108. (March 2, 2009). How to use body language to improve your
presentation online videos for busy business professionals BNET Video [Video].
Retrieved from YouTube. Used in accordance with the provisions of the Standard YouTube
License available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 3 minutes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXFIJ8Sm2N0&feature=youtu.be.

2. After watching this talk by Sheri Jeavons, you will be able to (1) explain the value of
eye contact when addressing an audience, and (2) use the eye-contact strategy to connect
with the audience.
PowerPresentation (Producer). (February 13, 2009). Effective presentation skills:
Using eye contact to connect with your audience [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube.
Used in accordance with the provisions of the Standard YouTube License available at
http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 5 minutes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSZfqCBUpOs&feature=youtu.be.

3. After watching this talk by Sheri Jeavons, you should be able to (1) explain the
importance of vocal variety and intonation for attracting and sustaining the audience's
attention, and (2) apply effective communication techniques to create excitement for your
topic and help your audience pay attention.
PowerPresentation (Producer). (February 26, 2009). Effective presentation skills:
Using vocal energy to excite your audience [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube. Used in
accordance with the provisions
http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.

of

the

Standard

YouTube

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 6 minutes.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gtMDX3dIKE&feature=youtu.be.

License

available

at

4. After watching this video by J Douglas Jefferys, MCP, you should be able to (1)
identify the major strategies to enhance a presentation delviery, (2) understand the
power of the pause, (3) define the concept of 'proper eye-contact', and (4) explain the
importance of adapting your presentation style to the target audience.
Jefferys, J.D. (February 24, 2008). Public speaking - From speaking zero to
speaking hero [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube. Used in accordance with the provisions of
the Standard YouTube License available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 3 minutes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DmGh3MvLCps&feature=youtu.be.

Please, proceed to

Module 3 Assignment

(The link has been intentionally invalidated for the Sample


learning materials presentation.)
You can also access Module 3 Assignment by clicking on
"Assignments/Module 3 Assignment" in the Course Navigation
Menu.
References (module 3)
Albion.com. (n.d.). The core rules of netiquette. Retrieved from
http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html.
All the images are retrieved from https://images.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl (a free image bank).
Dold, J. (February 15, 2013). Discussion board etiquette [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube.
Jefferys, J.D. (February 24, 2008). Public speaking - From speaking zero to speaking hero [Video].
Retrieved from YouTube.
MSMCOnlineLearning (Producer). (June 3, 2013). Student resources: A guide to netiquette in
online learning [Presentation]. Retrieved from YouTube.
PowerPresentation (Producer). (February 13, 2009). Effective presentation skills: Using eye contact
to connect with your audience [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube.

PowerPresentation (Producer). (February 26, 2009). Effective presentation skills: Using vocal
energy to excite your audience [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube.
Purdue University. (n.d.a). General writing resources. Retrieved from
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/1/.
Purdue University. (n.d.b). APA style. Retrieved from
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/.
Raghavendra108. (March 2, 2009). How to use body language to improve your presentation online
videos for busy business professionals BNET Video [Video].Retrieved from YouTube.
Simonson, M., Smaldino, S., Albright, M., & Zvacek, S. (2012). Teaching and learning at a
distance: Foundations of distance education (5th ed.) Boston, MA: Pearson.
University of Wisconsin. (n.d.). Discussion board etiquette. Retrieved from
https://www2.uwstout.edu/content/profdev/rubrics/discuss_etiquette.html.

Academic Integrity and Paraphrasing Skills


After watching the following videos, you will (1) gain an understanding of the essence of
plagiarism and be able to identify major strategies to avoid violations of academic
integrity. You will also (2) understand the implications that a student's unscholarly
behavior may have on his/her academic well-being, as well as on his/her further
professional career.
1. In this short video, Dr. Cameron Skinner, Associate Dean at the School of Graduate
Studies, Concordia University, dwells on the concept of plagiarism, the major reasons for
students' plagiarizing, and the far-reaching consequences of not meeting academic
integrity standards.
Skinner, C. (March 12, 2012). Academic integrity and what it means to your future
[Video]. Retrieved from YouTube on February 1, 2015. Used in accordance with the
provisions of the Standard YouTube License available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 6 minutes.
2. In this video the staff and students of York St John University talk about what

plagiarism is, how to avoid unscholarly behavior, and what is expected of students in
regards academic writing.
York St John University (Producer). (January 22, 2013). Understanding plagiarism
[Video]. Retrieved from YouTube on February 1, 2013. Used in accordance with the
provisions of the Standard YouTube License available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 4 minutes.

3. This video will introduce you to the concept of accidental plagiarism and provide tips
on how to avoid it.
Editage (Producer). (March 22, 2013). Tips to avoid Accidental Plagiarism [Video]. Retrieved
from You Tube on February 1, 2015. Used in accordance with the provisions of the Standard
YouTube License available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms .
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 4 minutes.

4. The following video is a short tutorial on paraphrasing. Students often find


paraphrasing difficult because "when you paraphrase, you express the same message in
different words" (Northwest Prep Charter School, November 4, 2013). After watching
this media piece, you should be able to acquire basic paraphrasing skills.
Northwest Prep Charter Shool (Producer). (November 4, 2013). How to paraphrase
[Video]. Retrieved from YouTube on February 1, 2015. Used in accordance with the
provisions of the Standard YouTube License available at.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 9 minutes.


References
Editage (Producer). (March 22, 2013). Tips to avoid Accidental Plagiarism [Video]. Retrieved from
You Tube on February 1, 2015.
Northwest Prep Charter Shool (Producer). (November 4, 2013). How to paraphrase [Video].
Retrieved from YouTube on February 1, 2015.
Skinner, C. (March 12, 2012). Academic integrity and what it means to your future [Video].
Retrieved from YouTube on February 1, 2015.
York St John University (Producer). (January 22, 2013). Understanding plagiarism [Video].
Retrieved from YouTube on February 1, 2013.

Back to Tips

For Academic Success In Distance Learning

Critical thinking
"Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day; show him how to catch fish, and you feed
him for a lifetime" (proverb).
Critical thinking is a skill that helps one move towards self-reliance. "Memorize the
solution to a problem, and you may master that particular problem; improve your
critical thinking, and you will give yourself the tools to create your own effective
solutions to a multitude of unfamiliar problems" (QualiaSoup, December 24, 2009).
After watching the following video, you should be able to identify the major critical
thinking principles, the levels of a critical aproach to information assessment, as well as
the advantages that critical thinking skills give one inside and outside an academic
institution.
QualiaSoup (Producer). (December 24, 2009). Critical thinking [Video]. Retrieved
from YouTube on February 1, 2015. Used in accordance with the provisions of the Standard
YouTube License available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 5 minutes.
References
QualiaSoup (Producer). (December 24, 2009). Critical thinking [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube
on February 1, 2015.

Back to Tips

For Academic Success In Distance Learning

Time Management
1. This video is part of The Penguin Prof's College Success Series and was created
specifically to address the time management issues that undergraduate and graduate
students encounter. It provides working guidelines on how to manage your time to be
able to do all the thing that you want and need to do.
After watching this video, you should be able to (1) explain why sound time management
skills are important for academic success, and (2) identify strategies to manage your time
more efficiently.
Penguin Prof Channel (Producer). (July 19, 2010). How to manage time, reduce
stress and increase happiness [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube on February 1,
2015. Used in accordance with the provisions of the Standard YouTube License available at
http://www.youtube.com/t/terms .
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 10 minutes.

2. In this video, Jim Ghormley, faculty member at the University of Phoenix, dwells on
Speed Study and Accelerated Learning techniques. After watching this media piece, you
should be able to identify good study time management techniques.
After watching this video, you should be able to identify specific strategies that will help
you to manage academic workload.
Ghormley, J. (May 16, 2010). How to study smarter - not harder...get better grades
in school or college (Part 2) [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube on February 1, 2015.
Used in accordance with the provisions of the Standard YouTube License available at
http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 3 minutes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZdDG5WMvZDk&index=12&list=PL7841EFF05253EE3F72,5
45
References
Ghormley, J. (May 16, 2010). How to study smarter - not harder...get better grades in school or
college (Part 2) [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube on February 1, 2015.
Penguin Prof Channel (Producer). (July 19, 2010). How to manage time, reduce stress and increase
happiness [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube on February 1, 2015.
Back to Tips

For Academic Success In Distance Learning

Netiquette
This video was made with Prezi and is to familiarize online students with netiquette in
the online classroom.
After watching the presentation, you should be able to (1) understand the principles of
netiquette, (2) identify acceptable and/or unacceptable online behavior, and (3) explain
the value of netiquette for effective online communication.
Mount Saint Mary College (Producer). (June 3, 2013). Student Resources: A Guide
to Netiquette in Online Learning [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube on February 1,
2015. Used in accordance with the provisions of the Creative Commons Attribution License
available at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/legalcode.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 6 minutes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?x-yt-cl=85114404&v=HSnH5nQNAeY&x-yt-ts=1422579428.
References
Mount Saint Mary College (Producer). (June 3, 2013). Student Resources: A Guide to Netiquette in
Online Learning [Video]. Retrieved from YouTube on February 1, 2015.
Back to Tips

For Academic Success In Distance Learning

Teamwork and Collaboration


While developing effective teamwork and collaboration skills are considered important
to the learning process, many students find group work challenging and difficult. This
media piece features the opinions of the teaching staff working at a variety of
universities. Although initially targeting instructors, this episode is useful for students for
it shows what constitutes effective online teamwork, how to foster online collaboration
through developing leadership skills, how good teamwork and collaboration skills that
students develop through online-based teamwork transfer to their further professional
careers. This video explores how Internet technologies can improve the collaborative
process within online teamwork, and offer some useful strategies for making group-work
more effective, less time-consuming.
After watching this media, you should be able to (1) define effective online teamwork, (2)
explain the value of collaboration in an online learning environment, and (3) explain
how to foster online collaboration.
COFAonline UNSW (Producer). (May 2, 2011). Online teamwork and collaboration
[Video]. Retrieved from YouTube on February 1, 2015. Used in accordance with the
provisions of the Standard YouTube License available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms .
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 6 minutes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjcxKPIwoNA.
References
COFAonline UNSW (Producer). (May 2, 2011). Online teamwork and collaboration [Video].
Retrieved from YouTube on February 1, 2015.
Back to Tips

For Academic Success In Distance Learning

Formative Assessment, Peer Assessment, and


Self-Assessment
During the off-campus periods of a blended course, most communication among the
class takes place online - through discussion forums, wikis, and /or blogs, which all
require that each student reacts and responds to the other students' written work by
providing feedback. Giving feedback can be constructive or destructive. This video
provides tips for giving contructive/formative feedback.
1. After watching this media piece, you should be able to (1) understand what constitutes
formative/constructive feedback, (2) identify the major principles of
formative/constructive feedback, and (3) apply the principles of formative/constructive
feedback.
BecomeBetter.tv (Producer). (March 25, 2013). How to give constructive feedback Episode #149 [Video]. Retrieved from You Tube on February 1, 2015. Used in
accordance with the provisions of the Standard YouTube License available at
http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 1 minute.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmLZyB99ITA.

2. The following talk by Dylan Wiliam will introduce you to the concepts of peerassessment and self-assessment. After watching the video, you should be able to (1)
define peer- and self-assessment; (2) explain the value of peer- and self-assessment for
effective learning
Mary Land. (March 27, 2014). Self and peer assessment Dylan Wiliam [Video].
Retrieved from YouTube. Used in accordance with the provisions of the Standard YouTube License
available at http://www.youtube.com/t/terms.
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 3 minutes.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5P7VQxPqqTQ.
References
BecomeBetter.tv (Producer). (March 25, 2013). How to give constructive feedback - Episode #149
[Video]. Retrieved from You Tube on February 1, 2015.
Mary Land. (March 27, 2014). Self and peer assessment Dylan Wiliam [Video]. Retrieved
from YouTube on February 19, 2015.
Back to Tips

For Academic Success In Distance Learning