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ALVERNO COLLEGE

SUPERVISORS OBSERVATION
OF SPE 634 (A, B, C) Field Student
Candidate: Rachel Mixtacki
Supervisor: Charlyn Pozza
Cooperating Teacher: Lisa Larson
School:
Parkview Elementary School
Disability Categories Represented: Significant Developmental Delay
(SDD); Other Health Impaired (OHI); and Autism.

Check One: 1st Observation ___


2nd Observation _X__
Date: October 27, 2015
Number of Students: Four out of six present.
Grade: K4-K5
Subject(s): Beginning Math (Counting up to 5)
Diverse Student Needs Represented: Yes, this group of
Early Childhood students attend a self-contained
classroom with a diverse population of students with
special needs diagnosed with Autism, SDD and OHI
labels.
Evidence (Candidate)

Planning and Preparation (AEA: Conceptualization/Diagnosis


WTS: 1, 7 DISP: Respect, Responsibility - CEC: 1, 4, 5, 9, 10)

Uses teaching resources and curriculum materials that are appropriate in


representing the ideas and concepts.
Plans instruction appropriate to students stages of development and
learning styles.
Links new ideas to familiar ideas and makes connections to students
experiences.
Provides opportunities for active engagement, manipulation and testing of
ideas and materials.
Knows how to enhance learning through the use of a variety of materials.
Values flexibility in the teaching process by monitoring and adjusting plans
and adapting instruction when necessary and appropriate.
Chooses appropriate teaching strategies, learning experiences, and
materials to achieve different instructional purposes and to meet student
needs.
Varies his or her role in the instructional process in relation to the content
and purposes of instruction.
Plans motivational instruction by relating lessons to students personal
interest.
Seeks to find ways to meet the needs of diverse learners.

This observer was quite impressed with the well written and
thought out lesson plan that Ms. Mixtacki planned for her early
childhood students. During this observation she showed no
reluctance to work with her early childhood population and
what a difference several weeks made in her field observation
as she begins to gain confidence and being more comfortable
around these very young children. Her overall physical
presence and demeanor has adjusted quite well to teaching
this age level.
Ms. Mixtacki began her lesson with an introduction on
counting up to five objects that are in front of them in a linear
or scattered configuration. It was with great pleasure to see
her plan and develop beginning math teaching activities.
These activities not only interested her students but she was
able to choose activities with the use of foam fish
manipulatives, paper sharks, and an undersea water
worksheet to enhance her lesson of counting objects. She
also incorporated Pepperidge Farm Goldfish which always
helps to keep the attention of little ones because they love to
eat.
This observer could see that in Ms. Mixtackis planning
process that she took extra time to discuss with her
cooperating teacher, Ms. Larson, how she could help and
assist her students by developing a meaningful lesson plan.
She thoughtfully put together a lesson plan that had numerous

Copyright 2010. Alverno College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. All rights reserved under U.S., International
and Universal Copyright Conventions. Reproduction in part or whole by any method is prohibited by law.

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Evidence (Candidate)

Planning and Preparation (AEA: Conceptualization/Diagnosis


WTS: 1, 7 DISP: Respect, Responsibility - CEC: 1, 4, 5, 9, 10)

learning activities planned to help her students stay focused,


engaged and to teach them how to practice and learn how to
count up to 5 items in a linear or scattered pattern.
Ms. Mixtacki planned numerous and appropriate math
activities to keep her students actively involved in the learning
process. She also incorporated manipulatives into her plan
when she saw that students were getting off task. She used
physical movement composed of a great little song activity
called 1, 2, cha, cha, cha that worked quite well to get her
students to verbally count out loud. The majority of her
students bought into all of her planned math learning activities
which allowed her to teach her target goal and to get to her
learning outcome of arrange and count up to 5 objects in
scattered and linear configurations.
In trying to assess her students she utilized a simple log with
students names so that she could write down what they
demonstrated during her lesson. This log was an excellent
way for her to devise a method to keep track of how her
students were performing. This observer was impressed how
Ms. Mixtacki developed an easy way to keep track of her
students performance.
In Ms. Mixtackis planning, developing and implementing of
her lesson, she incorporated all the component parts of the
lesson plan format which showed her diligence in presenting a
great lesson. One thing she did not count on was that one of
her students was having an extremely challenging day with
their behavior. Even though Ms. Mixtacki did not skip a beat
with moving ahead with her lesson with her other students and
did ignore this students behavior there may have been a point
when she should have dealt with the behavior of this student.
It would be important for her to become familiar with this
students FBA/BIP strategies that are listed in this students
IEP. This student was dealt with more by the cooperating
teacher rather than Ms. Mixtacki which may be the way that
they have decided to approach this student. If Ms. Mixtacki
had been alone in this classroom then it would have been up
to her to deal with this childs inappropriate behavior. She
would have had to take on the the challenge of getting the
student to join her group. Ms. Mixtacki several times did ask
the student to join them. It appears that this is how they deal
Copyright 2010. Alverno College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. All rights reserved under U.S., International
and Universal Copyright Conventions. Reproduction in part or whole by any method is prohibited by law.

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Evidence (Candidate)

Planning and Preparation (AEA: Conceptualization/Diagnosis


WTS: 1, 7 DISP: Respect, Responsibility - CEC: 1, 4, 5, 9, 10)

with this student. Ms. Mixtacki did welcome the student into
the group when the child did decide to join the group. It
seemed that when Ms. Mixtacki took out the Goldfish that is
when the student decided to join the group. This was a smart
move on Ms. Mixtackis part because food always attracts the
attention of students.
In reflecting on her lesson, it was a valid way to approach this
student to get her to participate in the group. Ms. Mixtacki is
well aware of this students challenging behaviors and
attempted to deal with it without taking away from the other
students learning opportunities.
When this observer did ask Ms. Mixtacki: What steps did you
take to prepare your lesson today? She answered: I sat
down with Ms. Larson and asked her what skill sets might be
worthwhile for me to help these students to increase the
learning targets that they need help with, that is, the target
goals that Ms. Larson has set for them. After we talked, I
thought it would be good to incorporate breaks, movement
activities, and working towards what they needed. I wanted to
meet the standards of the Early Childhood component
curriculum and what they needed to improve their literacy and
math skills. That is how I attempted to develop my lesson
plan today.
Overall, it was a pleasure to watch Ms. Mixtacki present her
well-planned and thought out lesson to her eager learning
students. Her students participated willingly and performed all
the activities presented to them in counting up to five objects
that are in front of them in a linear or scattered configuration.
____Inadequate

____Emerging

__X__Proficient

____Distinctive

Copyright 2010. Alverno College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. All rights reserved under U.S., International
and Universal Copyright Conventions. Reproduction in part or whole by any method is prohibited by law.

ED FORM 711
0210 ED

Evidence (Candidate)

Planning and Preparation (AEA: Conceptualization/Diagnosis


WTS: 1, 7 DISP: Respect, Responsibility - CEC: 1, 4, 5, 9, 10)
Classroom Environment (AEA: Coordination/Integrative Interaction WTS: 2,
3, 5 - DISP: Respect, Responsibility CEC: 2, 3, 5)

Shows respect for the diverse talents of all learners.


Uses knowledge about human motivation and behavior to develop
strategies for organizing and supporting individual and group work.
Is committed to the expression and use of democratic values in the
classroom.
Organizes, allocates, and manages the resources of time, space, activities
and attention to engage students in productive tasks.
Knows how to help students work productively and cooperatively with each
other.
Uses strategies of effective classroom management to promote positive
relationships, cooperation, and purposeful learning in the classroom.
Respects students as individuals with differing personal and family
background and various skills, talents and interests.

Evidence (Candidate and Student)

Ms. Mixtacki demonstrated her ability to incorporate a variety


of math activities geared to the developmental and age level
appropriateness of her students to count up to five objects.
She utilized a kidney-shaped table at one of the learning
centers set up in this Early Childhood Classroom. She started
her lesson off by doing several math activities that ranged in
duration from 2 to 13 minutes. She moved through these
activities with precision and tried to mix up the activities using
manipulatives, and a song with hand and feet movements to
help her students count. She also used a simple worksheet,
fish counting objects, and a three dot strip that was given to
each student, in order, to give her students plenty of
opportunities to count objects in various configurations. It was
a great way for her to use a variety of teaching methods and
strategies to allow each of her students a chance to count up
to three and five objects.
Ms. Mixtacki worked with 4 out of 5 students that were
present today. As stated previously, one of the students was
being ignored due to behavior issues. It was interesting that
when the one student who was having a meltdown of crying
and wanting a drink of water that when this student did
decide to join the group, one of the other students told the
student (Name of the student) stop your crying! It was
interesting to observe that even the other students were tired
of this students behavior.
Ms. Mixtacki utilized good timing on her math activities and
for the most part had her students engaged in the learning
process. When she added more manipulatives that is when
she may have lost some of the students interest level. The
interest level of some of the students seemed to waiver when
she attempted her math activity that involved scattered
configurations. At this point, instead of giving all her students
the objects, she may have wanted to have one group activity
utilizing the underwater mat before attempting to have them
do the activity individually. This may be some food for thought
on her part. She may want to reflect on this part of her lesson
to see how she could have approached it to keep the high
interest level she had at the beginning of her lesson when her

Copyright 2010. Alverno College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. All rights reserved under U.S., International
and Universal Copyright Conventions. Reproduction in part or whole by any method is prohibited by law.

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Evidence (Candidate)

Planning and Preparation (AEA: Conceptualization/Diagnosis


WTS: 1, 7 DISP: Respect, Responsibility - CEC: 1, 4, 5, 9, 10)

activities were quick, short, and fast-paced. When her


learning activities were short and to the point the interest
level of her students was high. As she begins to learn more
about her students, she will know what she can do to keep
their high interest level. She may want to throw in a
movement activity or a song to keep them engaged.
Ms. Mixtacki used a variety of materials. She was able to use
the vocabulary words that she chose for this lesson, and she
demonstrated use of direct and probing questions that helped
her students to follow the intent of her math lesson.
Overall, Ms. Mixtackis math lesson was organized. She
respected the developmental and age levels of her students,
and she utilized numerous manipulatives and resources to
engage her students. She kept them engaged for a good
portion of her math lesson but she may want to rethink when
her lesson gets more complicated how she will keep the
interest level of her students to perform the math tasks she
has chosen to implement her lesson.
____Inadequate

____Emerging

X Proficient

____Distinctive

Instruction (AEA: Communication, Coordination, Diagnosis,


Integrative Interaction WTS 4, 6, 7 - DISP: Respect, Responsibility,
Communication CEC: 4, 6, 7, 8, 9)

Copyright 2010. Alverno College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. All rights reserved under U.S., International
and Universal Copyright Conventions. Reproduction in part or whole by any method is prohibited by law.

Evidence (Candidate and Student)

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Evidence (Candidate)

Planning and Preparation (AEA: Conceptualization/Diagnosis


WTS: 1, 7 DISP: Respect, Responsibility - CEC: 1, 4, 5, 9, 10)

Uses different representations and explanations of concepts when


necessary to accommodate students who approach learning from different
conceptual frameworks.
Uses teaching approaches that address different learning styles and
performance modes.
Uses instructional strategies that promote student learning for a range of
student abilities.
Encourages discussion.
Elicits samples of student thinking orally and in writing.
Values the development of students critical thinking, independent problemsolving, and performance capabilities by using varied teaching and learning
strategies to engage students in active learning.
Modifies explanations when necessary to assist students understanding.
Organizes, prepares students for, and monitors independent and group
work.
Recognizes the importance of verbal and nonverbal communication.
Is a thoughtful and responsive listener.
Communicates in ways that demonstrate a sensitivity to cultural and gender
differences.
Models appropriate communication strategies in conveying ideas and
information.
Supports learner expression in speaking and writing, and other media.
Knows how to ask questions and stimulate discussion in different ways.

During the implementation of Ms. Mixtackis math lesson, she


demonstrated her ability to use a variety of teaching methods. Her
teaching methods involved more with the implementation of her
lesson rather than her using direct instruction to reinforce a math
concept of counting up to 5 that apparently had been previously
taught. She planned and initiated 5 to 6 math activities. These
activities varied in time; utilized motor-kinesthetic movements; fish
manipulatives; counting blocks; and a mystery counting activity to
enhance their short term memory which were all effective learning
strategies. These math activities kept her students engaged. She
also used essential questions with her students, in order, to get
them to perform.
Ms. Mixtacki not only used a variety of manipulatives, like, dot
strips, Pepperidge Farm fish, foam rubber fish, colored blocks, a
worksheet, and paper sharks to give her students ample
opportunities to count three to five objects. She also used a simple
log activity allowing her to assess how her students were
performing on the various math activities that she had planned for
in her 30 minute lesson.
Ms. Mixtacki utilized a variety of questions based off of Bloom and
was able to incorporate questions and statements, like, How many
fish did you count? Which one is easier to count? What did you
count? Can you grab three fish? Please line your fish up so that you
can count them. How can we count our objects, in a row or all
mixed up? What way is easier for you to count them?
Ms. Mixtacki demonstrated the use of verbal praise by telling her
students individually that they did a good job or a great job. She
was patient with them and attempted to go around the kidneyshaped table to give them each a chance to count their objects.
She showed them what they had to do with the objects, like, lining
them up in a line on a dot strip so that they could count their
objects. As she observed the students losing interest in the longer
math activity of 13 minutes that is when she stated out loud I am
sinking. At that point instead of her putting all the manipulatives
out, she may have wanted to push everything aside and only work
on one activity. She may have over stimulated her students and she
could have brought it back to doing a group activity or a physical
movement, like, the 1, 2, cha, cha, cha activity that would have
brought them back to what she had originally intended them to do
and that was count up to five objects.
Ms. Mixtacki realized her 13 minute activity may have been too
long. She needed to redirect her students back to an earlier activity
that they had done so that she could summarize her math lesson at
the end.

Copyright 2010. Alverno College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. All rights reserved under U.S., International
and Universal Copyright Conventions. Reproduction in part or whole by any method is prohibited by law.

ED FORM 711
0210 ED

Evidence (Candidate)

Planning and Preparation (AEA: Conceptualization/Diagnosis


WTS: 1, 7 DISP: Respect, Responsibility - CEC: 1, 4, 5, 9, 10)

When Ms. Mixtacki was asked What do you believe you can do
next time to improve your lesson plan for your students? She
answered: I need to be able to sense the frustration levels of my
students during the various activities and sense when the students
have had enough. I then need to switch activities and be mindful
when they are done with something and use something different to
bring them back to the target goal and learning objectives. She
was well aware that she had lost them on one of the activities and
she became frustrated. She was able to deal with the frustration but
this observer would suggest that she use this opportunity to change
up her lesson and to be in control of the lesson to bring it back to
where she wants it to go for the success of her students. It is
obvious that her awareness that she had lost some of her students
shows that with more experience she will learn how to bring her
lesson around so that she ends on a positive note.
It should be noted that the paraprofessional that is assigned to Ms.
Larsons room was not really assisting either the classroom teacher
or Ms. Mixtacki during this math lesson. When this observer asked
about the situation, Ms. Mixtacki indicated that this individual is not
really helping which is too bad because she could be a great asset
in assisting these early childhood students in their learning process.
It is hoped that Ms. Larson, the cooperating teacher will be able to
deal with this situation and correct it with the Principal or the
Special Services Supervisor that is assigned to that school.
Overall, Ms. Mixtacki demonstrated the use of a variety of math
activities that allowed her students to show her that they could
count at least three to five objects. It appeared that they could do it
in a linear line but when it came to scattered configurations they
seemed to have a more difficult time. She is well aware that as her
students become frustrated or confused in the learning process,
Ms. Mixtacki has to remember not to get frustrated herself but to
keep calm and bring it back to what she originally set out to do and
that is to teach her students to count up to five objects that are in
front of them in a linear or scattered configuration.
____Inadequate

____Emerging

_X__Proficient

____Distinctive

Assessment (AEA: Diagnosis/Integrative Interaction WTS: 8, 9


DISP: Collaboration, Communication CEC: 1, 5, 8, 9, 10)

Copyright 2010. Alverno College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. All rights reserved under U.S., International
and Universal Copyright Conventions. Reproduction in part or whole by any method is prohibited by law.

Evidence (Candidate and Student)

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Evidence (Candidate)

Planning and Preparation (AEA: Conceptualization/Diagnosis


WTS: 1, 7 DISP: Respect, Responsibility - CEC: 1, 4, 5, 9, 10)

Knows how to select and construct assessment strategies and instruments.


Uses appropriate assessment techniques to enhance his or her knowledge
of learners, evaluate students progress and performances, and modify
teaching and learning strategies.
Solicits and uses information about students experiences, learning
behavior, needs and progress from cooperating teachers and the students
themselves.
Evaluates the effect of class activities on both individuals and the class as a
whole, collecting information through observation of classroom
interactions, questioning, and analysis of student work.
Uses classroom observation and information about students as sources
for evaluating the outcomes of teaching and as a basis for reflecting on
and revising practice.

____Inadequate

____Emerging

__X__Proficient

Ms. Mixtacki did an excellent job in this area of assessment. She


demonstrated this by developing a simple log where she was able
to write down notes by students names, like, were they able to do
one to one correspondence, were they able to count three objects,
were they able to answer questions posed to them about visualizing
a quantity and matching it to a number. This log was Ms. Mixtacki
way of analyzing what her students have mastered and what they
need help with. She would be able to use this informal assessment
and know what she would have to plan out to develop her next
math lesson when she met with them. This simple form to assess
her students was a great way to keep track of her students
progress. It was great that she took suggestions from the last
observation and attempted to improve her delivery and
implementation in this area. It was with great pleasure that she
developed and utilized an assessment form that she could use
throughout her field observation.
The summative portion of her assessment was able to be
accomplished for the linear portion of her students counting their
objects when using a three dot strip. She attempted the five dot
strip but this activity appeared to be more difficult for her students.
After seeing her students perform a more complex task of trying to
line up fish after being scattered and then attempting to have them
swim in a circle she lost them and it became too hard for them to
follow the task. Ms. Mixtacki became well aware of the confusion
and frustration of her students and she tried to bring them back.
This is where she may want to reflect back on this activity and ask
herself What should I have done to bring them back to complete
my lesson and summarize it so that I could close the lesson out?
The next time she is back working with her students she may want
to think about an activity to see if they are able to count up to five
objects that are in front of them in a linear configuration. The
scattered configuration she may want to approach when they have
the one to one correspondence down.
Overall, Ms. Mixtacki was able to address the formative
assessment of her lesson. She developed and utilized a simple
notation log that allowed her to keep notes as to how her students
did individually which will give her the planning tools to address the
summative assessment and plan her next lesson for her students.

____Distinctive

Professional Responsibilities (AEA: Communication/Integrative Interaction


WTS: 10 DISP: Responsibility, Collaboration, Communication CEC: 2, 5, 10)
Copyright 2010. Alverno College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. All rights reserved under U.S., International
and Universal Copyright Conventions. Reproduction in part or whole by any method is prohibited by law.

Evidence (Candidate)

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Relates professionally and effectively with the cooperating teacher and


faculty.
Dresses professionally and consistently portrays a professional demeanor.
Is enthusiastic about teaching.
Seeks out the cooperating teacher to support his/her development as a
learner and a teacher.

Ms. Mixtacki presented herself in a very confident and professional


manner that showed that she is becoming much more comfortable in this
Early Childhood Classroom setting. She related quite well with her
students and she attempted desperately to have the one student who
was experiencing a challenging day to have this student join her group
lesson. When the student did decide to join the group she welcomed the
student with open arms and said to this student: I am so glad that you
decided to come and join us so that you can count your fish. Her voice
was welcoming and she showed that she understood the behavior
struggle this child was having on this day. It was great to see Ms.
Mixtacki react so appropriately with this student. One suggestion that this
observer would make is to suggest again that Ms. Mixtacki attempt to
follow the behavior management system that Ms. Larson has set up in
her classroom so that the students are well aware of the rules and the
consequences that have been set up and enforced in this classroom
since the beginning of the school year. It would also have been
appropriate if the paraprofessional in the classroom would have helped
this student who was experiencing the behavior problem rather than just
sit in the classroom. It is hoped that Ms. Mixtacki and Ms. Larson will
discuss what occurred in the classroom with this paraprofessional and
discuss with this staff member what her job responsibilities are when it
comes to working with the children. Ms. Mixtacki was well aware of the
situation and she indicated she would be speaking with her cooperating
teacher about it.
Ms. Mixtacki was dressed appropriately. She was able to hold herself
together throughout her math lesson even when she found her students
to become unengaged when they tried to count their objects in a
scattered configuration. For some it may have been too much stimuli and
she lost them when trying to make this transition of doing something a
little harder. She was well aware that she had lost them and she tried to
bring her lesson back to finish it properly.
Ms. Mixtackis relationship with her cooperating teacher, Ms. Larson has
developed and grown since being in this field placement. Ms. Larson
appears to want to share her knowledge about early childhood
development and the teaching strategies that are useful in developing
her students skill levels. Ms. Mixtacki and her cooperating teacher
discuss these developmental levels of the individual students and they
both want their students to be able to learn the developmental concepts
that are needed to get them to learn what they need according to their
IEP goals and objectives.
Ms. Larson appears to be very willing to pass onto Ms. Mixtacki the
knowledge base with regards to Early Childhood Development. It
appears that they have long discussions about learning outcomes and
goals that should be worked on with their students, they discuss and
decide how to switch things up when it is needed to meet the needs of
the students and she allows Ms. Mixtacki to not only make choices as to

Copyright 2010. Alverno College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. All rights reserved under U.S., International
and Universal Copyright Conventions. Reproduction in part or whole by any method is prohibited by law.

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what she is going to teach the students but to make sure that the
students get what they need. The support Ms. Larson gives to Ms.
Mixtacki was demonstrated by the cordial inviting relationship they have
with one another where they can talk about what went well and what
should have been changed up. Ms. Larson is willing to offer assistance,
guidance, and answer any questions that Ms. Mixtacki may have for her.
She gets involved and tries to support Ms. Mixtacki as best she can.
Overall, the blossoming relationship between Ms. Mixtacki and Ms.
Larson was observed by the way that they work cooperatively together to
teach these early childhood students what they need to improve the
learning outcomes for their students.
____Inadequate

____Emerging

_X__Proficient

____Distinctive

Summary Statement:
Overall, Ms. Mixtacki came well prepared with a well thought out math lesson that included numerous math activities to allow her students to show her how they
count up to five objects that are in front of them in a linear or scattered configuration. She allowed her students to have ample opportunities to see if they could
count these objects with various manipulatives that included visual, auditory, and motor kinesthetic tasks. Her students were well engaged for the shorter activities
but longer ones showed her that these students are not yet ready to sit through long lengthy discussions to learn something.
Ms. Mixtacki developed and utilized a quick assessment log that allowed her to know what her students had learned and what they would need help with. She is
becoming very confident in dealing with this early childhood population and she owes this to the teaching enthusiasm she shows by doing what is right for her
students and to give them what they need to learn, in order, to develop the skill levels that will help them to gain success in school.

Overall Performance: ____Inadequate

____Emerging

__X__Proficient

____Distinctive

Copyright 2010. Alverno College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. All rights reserved under U.S., International
and Universal Copyright Conventions. Reproduction in part or whole by any method is prohibited by law.

ED FORM 711
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